Germans Launch Offshore Wind Supply Chain Support Campaign

first_imgGerman wind energy agency WAB has launched a campaign aimed at supporting the visibility of the local offshore wind supply chain.The launch of the German Inland Campaign comes as the German offshore wind supply chain is affected by the reduced expansion targets, WAB said.The agency emphasized that it wants to inform and draw attention to the fact that the cap on offshore wind expansion is wrong and needs to be corrected urgently as many small and medium-sized supplier companies (SMEs) suffer from the lack of secure framework conditions and the less ambitious expansion target.“The German Inland Campaign underlines the importance of Germany-wide SMEs for the offshore value chain and the energy turnaround. A strong domestic market enables these companies to tap export potential and offers the necessary long-term basis for creating further jobs,” said WAB Interim Managing Director Heike Winkler.WAB is calling on Berlin politicians to provide a clear commitment to the offshore wind industry, including the special contribution written down in the coalition agreement, which should comprise up to 2GW in order not to endanger any further jobs in this future-oriented wind industry, Winkler said.The German Inland Campaign is supported by the EU project Inn2POWER.last_img read more

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Katherine “Cody” Holt, 83, Versailles

first_imgKatherine “Cody” Holt, 83, of Versailles passed away at 11:30pm, Monday, October 1, 2018 at Highpoint Health in Lawrenceburg. She was born near Milan on July 20, 1935 the daughter of Charles and Thresa Beach Kemker. She was married to Ray Holt and he preceded her in death. Survivors include two daughters Connie Rohrig of Milan, and Bonnie (David) McCabe of Moores Hill; one son Leo (Bud) Ward of Cross Plains; 11 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren; one sister Pat (Claude) Morris of Moores Hill. She was also preceded in death by her parents, her son Chris Ward, her brothers Lee, Bine, and Butch Kemker, and her sisters Theresa Jane Adams, Norma Suttman, Daisy Linzy, and Doris Smith. Mrs. Holt was a 1953 graduate of Versailles High School. She was a former employee of the Delaney Wood Heel Factory, and also the Regal Supermarket, both in Versailles. She retired from Federal Mogul in Greensburg and in her retirement years she served as custodian at the Tyson Library in Versailles. Cody enjoyed watching sports on TV, baking pies, gardening, and attending her grandchildren’s sports events. She attended the Moores Hill Church of Christ. Funeral services for Cody will be held on Monday, October 8th at 2pm at the Stratton-Karsteter Funeral Home in Versailles with Pastor Tito Pel of the Moores Hill Church of Christ officiating. Burial will be in the Cliff Hill Cemetery in Versailles. Visitation will be on Sunday from 4pm to 7pm. Memorials may be given to the Moores Hill Church of Christ or the Cliff Hill Cemetery in care of the funeral home.last_img read more

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LSU star running back Derrius Guice ruled out for Syracuse game

first_img Published on September 20, 2017 at 11:57 am Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Guice sat out practice Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, recovering from what Orgeron said Monday is a “minor injury,” according to Nola.com. Guice missed the last quarter and a half of LSU’s loss against Mississippi State. The junior took 15 carries for 76 yards last week and has 57 rushes for 300 yards and four touchdowns this season.Orgeron’s best player is Guice, whom a college football coach told Sports Illustrated “might be a better back than Leonard Fournette,” because he’s “harder to tackle because he runs with so much juice guys can’t corral him.”“He’s a very, very talented back,” SU head coach Dino Babers said Monday. “I think he’s different from the starter last year. I think he’s more complete. I think he can catch passes, I think he can run, and he’s tough between the tackles. He’s one of those guys that gets six, eight, 10, then he goes for 20, then he goes for 40. He’s going to be very difficult to stop.”Senior Darrel Williams has taken the second-most snaps on the LSU roster. He has one start this year, 28 carries for 159 yards and four rushing touchdowns.On the ACC coaches teleconference call, Syracuse coach Dino Babers said he thought his team will see Guice dressed out on Saturday.“That guy is a competitor,” Babers said, “I’m sure he’s going to be out there.”Regardless, Syracuse will not have to face one of the top tailbacks in the country, the same way it did in the SU-LSU matchup two years ago. Tigers running back and 2017 NFL Draft No. 4 overall pick Leonard Fournette ran for two touchdowns and 244 yards in a 34-24 win at the Carrier Dome.Syracuse is 1-2 all-time against the Tigers, its lone win coming at the 1989 Hall of Fame Bowl in Tampa, Florida, a 23-10 victory. Syracuse lost the teams’ first meeting, in New Orleans, 10-13 in  the 1964 season and lost the teams’ last meeting, 2015, 34-24 at the Dome.Game time is scheduled Saturday for 7 p.m. from Death Valley on ESPN2.Additional notes from the ACC and SEC teleconferences:Babers on LSU OC Matt Canada, who served the same role at Pittsburgh last season, a 76-61 SU loss: “What we saw, we couldn’t stop at Pitt. In a sense, he’s more dangerous than he’s ever been.”On whether freshman running back Markenzy Pierre, who fumbled on his second carry last week, will get early snaps: “Ball security is job security in our program.”Orgeron on Syracuse: “I think they have a great scheme. His offensive scheme is very hard to defend. They have the right QB and are playing better defense.”CORRECTION: In a previous version of this post, Markenzy Pierre was misnamed. The Daily Orange regrets this error. Comments UPDATED: Sept. 20, 2017 at 1:16 a.m.No. 25 Louisiana State star running back Derrius Guice has been ruled out for Saturday’s game against Syracuse, Tigers head coach Ed Orgeron said Wednesday night on his radio show.“He will not play this week,” Orgeron said, “but he is getting better.”Wednesday morning on the SEC coaches teleconference, Orgeron said he was unsure whether Guice would play.center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Homecoming week ends in victorious celebration for Wisconsin football team

first_imgThe 2017 homecoming week celebrations ended on a high note after the University of Wisconsin football team demolished the Maryland Terrapins.Wisconsin started the game off strong, with T.J. Edwards managing to get a touchdown off an interception from Maryland quarterback Max Bortenschlager. This would earn Wisconsin their first goal of the game and from that point out, the Badgers would manage to overpower Maryland, holding them to only three points during the first half.Daniel Yun/The Badger HeraldWhat the first few Big Ten games can reveal about Wisconsin football’s futureAfter an outstanding performance in Nebraska and Northwestern, the University of Wisconsin football team has positioned itself to be number Read…Wisconsin saw a strong game played on all fronts of the game, with the offense scoring 28 points in the first half, and the defense managing to make some big plays. This was unlike many of the games Wisconsin has played earlier on in the season, where the Badgers tended to struggle during the first half of the game.Daniel Yun/The Badger HeraldSaturday’s game would also lead to a very unfortunate injury as UW’s Chris Orr would leave the game during the second period with an upper arm injury. Orr would be ruled out during  half-time, and his presence was noticed during the second half of the game.The second half of the game was slower for Wisconsin than one would have liked, with the team struggling to find the same momentum that they had managed to find during the first half. Maryland, however, had no problem mustering up some drive during the second half.Riley Steinbrenner/The Badger HeraldMaryland — who was held to only a field goal during the first half of the game, managed to create some pretty good plays for themselves — gaining ten points by the end of the third quarter. Wisconsin, in the mean time, wouldn’t manage to get back on the board until the fourth period.Still, Wisconsin showed a great effort during the game, and even with Orr missing, the Wisconsin defense still managed to hold back the Terrapins to only 13 points. Maryland is a tough opponent that showed Wisconsin is capable of playing a tough game and walking away with a high score.Football: Amid the rain and cold, Wisconsin still manages to shine for third Big Ten winThe University of Wisconsin football team did not have much on their side Saturday, but they still managed to produce Read…Another celebration coming out of this series was the fact that Wisconsin’s running back extraordinaire Jonathan Taylor managed to get his 1,000 rushing yard during the first quarter of the game. He joins seven other quarterbacks who have managed to achieve that goal during their Freshman year, including Adrian Peterson and Emmitt Smith.Riley Steinbrenner/The Badger HeraldAs strange as it might sound, the success of this game is actually not determined by what happened on the field today, but rather what will happen on the field in Pennsylvania later this evening. Depending on how the Penn State and Michigan game goes later today, it is possible that Wisconsin will be the only undefeated team remaining in the Big Ten.38    Wisconsin   Final Score   Maryland   13Post-game sounds:Head coach Paul Chryst on helping Taylor be successful at UW:“You’re proud of all that goes into it, and we’ve got a lot more football to be played. I think he’s a really good back and I think that’s part of the reason why [Taylor] came here. He wants to be a good running back at a place where there has been some good running backs. We have to help him to continue to grow and be the best that he can be. It takes everyone [to do so].”Fumagalli on finally getting back into the swing of things after his injury against Northwestern:“During the week I felt great. I didn’t want to rush it. I know it is a long season so I wanted to take my time and just get better this week. Finally I got loose this week and it felt great helping the team out.”last_img read more

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SG Digital passes Cheltenham Festival test with flying colours

first_img Submit StumbleUpon Share Share SG Digital, the interactive division of Scientific Games, has published its trading data from last week’s 2019 Cheltenham Festival (12-15 March) detailing that its OpenBet sportsbook platforms processed a combined 48 million bets during the event.Servicing the industry’s largest portfolio of tier-1 sportsbook clients during the flagship week of UK racing, SG Digital states that its OpenBet systems maintained a steady ‘uptime throughout the Festival, enabling maximum engagement across customer sportsbooks’.During Cheltenham 2019,  SG Digital’s sportsbook customers processed over 48.2 million bets over the four-day period, marking an increase of over 23% since last year.Furthermore, the festival proved a big acquisition driver for its sportsbook customers recording huge spikes in activity, in which at its peak wagering activity saw bets placed at 26,000 per minute.Detailing further insights, OpenBet systems processed a total volume of 302 million account transactions with 100% platform stability reported throughout the week.Keith O’Loughlin, SVP Sportsbook for SG Digital, stated that SG Digital performance during the demanding week was a testament to the technology group’s ‘continued investment in its technology allowing its customers to grow their player base while ensuring next level player experiences’.“The Cheltenham Festival is a fantastic tradition both in the racing industry and the sports betting world,” he said. “SG Digital’s OpenBet has a track record of reliability that held true during this year’s Festival, further cementing out commitment to partnering with operators to create unmatched player experiences.”last_img read more

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Fitness Friday: WBKB Reporter, Star Connor Skates, Roller Derby Style

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisWhen it comes to Roller Derby it’s not all about getting down on skates to push and shove each other, there’s actually a lot of core workouts, moves, and strength that comes with it. Shipwreck Alley Rollers, Head Coach, Skella shows Reporter, Star Connor all it takes to be apart of the team.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: fitness friday, Roller Derby, Shipwreck Alley RollersContinue ReadingPrevious Friends of Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary Receives Grant to Help ‘Get Into Your Sanctuary’Next United Way of Northeast Michigan Holds 2nd Annual Back to School Initiative For Studentslast_img read more

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Azkals begin buildup for biggest match yet

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Scarlett Johansson, Sterling K. Brown among SAG Awards presenters Ateneo sweeps NU for 6th win in 7 games MOST READ Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Conor McGregor seeks to emerge from controversy in UFC comeback LATEST STORIES View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Cabuyao City rising above the ashes through volunteerism Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netWith players returning from injuries and foreign-based recruits all making themselves available, the Philippine Azkals buckled down to work on Saturday in preparation for their most important match yet. The Azkals face Tajikistan on March 27 in their final game of AFC Asian Cup Qualifying at Rizal Memorial Stadium with the Filipinos needing a draw to punch their ticket to the continental showpiece event next year in the United Arab Emirates. ADVERTISEMENT In Liverpool, Man United sees the pain and path to recovery Azkals captain Phil Younghusband said the return of the likes of Manny Ott and Javier Patino from injury should come as a huge boost for the side that drew its last three matches.“It gives us confidence knowing we have players who could have made a difference in the past three games back for this game,” said Younghusband. “We all missed Patino and Manny in the previous games. Patrick (Reichelt) is also back.” FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkOnly the local-based Azkals joined training at McKinley Hill Stadium last Saturday with the rest of the foreign-based players like Neil Etheridge, Daisuke Sato, Iain Ramsay, Pika Minegishi, Misagh Bahadoran and new recruit Michael Falkesgaard linking up with the team next week.Etheridge will still play for Cardiff City in the English Championship this weekend. Cardiff is currently in a strong position to gain promotion to the English Premier League with Etheridge among its key players.  The Azkals clash with Fiji in a friendly on Thursday also at Rizal Memorial Stadium as Dooley tries to whip his squad into shape for the crucial duel with the Tajiks five days later. Tajikistan will qualify with a victory over the Azkals, whose fate will now depend on the result of the Yemen-Nepal match. A win by both Tajikistan and Yemen will eliminate the Azkals. Younghusband acknowledged the importance of the match for the sport in the country. “As it (match) gets closer, I can feel the pressure a bit more with the situation of Philippine football right now,” said Younghusband. “I think we need another milestone, another achievement, another success for football to grow again and this match (against) Tajikistan gives us that chance.” ADVERTISEMENT Recto seeks to establish Taal rehab body to aid community, eruption victims Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player awardlast_img read more

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Wind power project gets OK

first_imgA project to bring more electricity generated by windmills to Southern California was approved last week by the state Public Utilities Commission despite objections from residents in northern Los Angeles County. The first segment of Southern California Edison’s Tehachapi transmission project must still get final approval from the U.S. Forest Service. The Tehachapi project would upgrade high-voltage transmission lines capable of delivering 4,500 megawatts of electricity from wind farms in northern Los Angeles and eastern Kern counties. In October, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors supported Leona Valley and Agua Dulce presidents in fighting the proposed high-voltage transmission line through their communities, urging Edison to keep it away from homes. In Santa Clarita, the city also asked for modifications. Edison already had agreed to shift the lines to avoid homes west of Rosamond and in the new Ritter Ranch and Anaverde master-plan communities in the Antelope Valley. The project is to be built in 11 segments to coincide with the development of wind farms. The first segment would include construction of a 26-mile, 500-kilovolt transmission line connecting Edison’s Antelope substation in Lancaster with the utility’s Pardee substation in Santa Clarita. The line is expected to be operational in early 2009. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Investigation kept going in small steps

first_imgBy Gene Maddaus STAFF WRITER Shane Sprewell stretched out on a lawn chair in his front yard and settled in to sell crack. In an hour, six customers came to the front gate. It was an ordinary day in Ghost Town. Sprewell made no effort to conceal himself. The 16-block area of Wilmington had been a narcotics bazaar for 30 years. The neighbors – either complacent, cowed or complicit – were not about to call the police. The relationship between McNamara and Jordan stretches back to the LAPD’s Newton Division. In 2005, McNamara oversaw a Narcotics Abatement Unit that did a similar probe of the East Coast Crips. Jordan was part of the investigative team. In that case, the City Attorney’s Office confiscated three apartment complexes that had been controlled by the gang for 25 years and turned them over to developers, who are now building single- family homes on the land. “It put a large dent in their operation,” Jordan said. “They’re a nationwide gang, but in that area it crippled them.” McNamara was promoted shortly thereafter to become the commanding officer of the Harbor Division station. Early this year, she was on the verge of being promoted again – this time to commander, handling counterterrorism issues out of the LAPD’s Parker Center headquarters. But before she left the Harbor, she wanted to tackle one last entrenched drug market: Ghost Town. For generations the neighborhood had been controlled by an interlocking network of close-knit, drug-dealing families that collectively went by the gang name East Side Pain. It was no secret – neighbors knew, police knew. Veteran cops had been arresting East Side Pain members in Ghost Town their entire careers. If anybody missed it, the gang made sure to advertise itself, liberally spray-painting the letters “ESP” on blank walls and playground equipment. McNamara called Jordan and asked if she’d be interested in re-forming the Narcotics Abatement Unit and taking on Ghost Town. Jordan didn’t waste much time thinking about it. Two weeks later, she was on stakeout, watching Shane Sprewell sell crack. In the beginning it was just Jordan and her partner. Soon, she brought in other cops from the Harbor Area gang and narcotics units to help with surveillance and undercover buys, and to provide background on the gang. In March, more help arrived: The ATF signed on to the case. Though the federal agents were able to bring in better technology – some microphones and hidden cameras – their most valuable assets were two confidential informants, known in court papers as CI-658 and CI-245. CI-658 has been a crack user for almost 30 years. He was arrested many times in the late 1980s and early ’90s for prostitution. After a conviction for drug possession last year, he was classified as an “insane prisoner” and sent to Atascadero State Hospital. Within six weeks of his parole in January, he was telling the ATF and the LAPD about drug sales at the Catalina Motel in Ghost Town. CI-658 was used twice in early March to buy crack from Marvin Reed, a gun-toting parolee selling drugs out of his motel room. After that, the ATF brought in a more veteran informant, CI-245, who had previously worked for the Drug Enforcement Agency, the LAPD and the FBI. During his five-year career as an informant – which overlapped by about a year his 26-year career as a manufacturer and distributor of PCP – he had been paid $148,000 in government funds. While working as an informant, he had gotten into trouble several times. Once, the DEA had to intervene in a case to help get him into a work furlough program. On another occasion, the DEA learned he had been selling marijuana on the sly to the target of an investigation. He continued to use PCP as recently as March. But overall, he was deemed to be reliable and highly useful. In 2004, he was a key part of an investigation into PCP distribution that netted 54 arrests. On March 14, he checked into the Catalina Motel. He met Marvin Reed the same afternoon. Reed, 44, was on parole on a battery case and had a record of drug dealing and attempted carjacking stretching back to 1983. Reed’s drug activity was known to the motel ownership. The heavy traffic of crack users – known as “baseheads” and “zombies” in street argot – annoyed the owner, Dahiben Patel, who lived on site. To compensate for the nuisance, Reed paid a weekly fee to Patel’s son, Manoj, for the privilege of selling drugs at the motel. (The Patels did not return a call seeking comment on the allegations, which have spurred the federal government to attempt to seize the motel.) A gregarious sort, Reed had numerous connections in the local drug trade. He had a habit of referring to his associates as his “cousins,” even if they were not related. In time, Reed would introduce the informant to numerous other drug suppliers, and would take $100 commissions on sales that he brokered. One of them was Henry “Boo” Hood, 32, who is one of several defendants who have already agreed to plead guilty. Hood was on parole for a 2004 conviction for selling crack while carrying a firearm. “There’s no doubt that Mr. Hood was selling quantities of crack cocaine,” said his lawyer, Michael Shannon. “That’s what he was doing. I don’t believe it was a major source of income of his.” Hood’s sister, Doniel Fox, said his other job was managing a carwash in Compton. “He works every day,” she said. “He’s a big ol’ kid. He’s a family man. He takes his kids to school. He takes them out to eat a lot at McDonald’s.” Hood became ensnared in the investigation on April 4. Reed was out of town when the informant called seeking crack, so he called Hood and told him to make the deal. Hood agreed to meet the informant at a gas station parking lot at Rosecrans and Western avenues. He pulled up on a motorcycle and sold the informant 76 grams for $1,650. That wholesale price – roughly $600 per ounce – could be marked up more than 200 percent by the time the product reached the street. Figures from various undercover buys suggest that 76 grams would be worth more than $5,000 once it was chopped into tiny pieces – usually smaller than a gram – and packaged in small plastic bindles for sale to users on the street. According to investigators, East Side Pain had cornered a lucrative market. “East Side Pain controlled most rock cocaine sales in Wilmington,” Jordan said. “Other gangs dealt methamphetamine. But rock cocaine is widely used across racial lines. You’re probably going to get more money than you would from meth. And it’s easier to cook.” The next time he met the informant, Hood said the price was going up about $25 an ounce. The area was experiencing a crack shortage. Another dealer, Tyus Newborn, remarked on the same shortage two months later during a deal at a Burger King parking lot in Wilmington. This time, the price was up to $750 per ounce. Newborn told the informant he bought powder cocaine for $17,000 a kilogram. Once it was processed into crack, he said he was able to “name his own price” due to the shortage. Newborn, who did another deal with a 3-year-old girl in the back seat, has also agreed to a guilty plea. (Newborn’s attorney, Joseph Walsh, declined to comment on the case, saying “There’s nothing my client can gain by cooperating with the news media.”) As the months progressed, the informant crossed paths with several other suppliers who were pumping crack and weapons into Ghost Town. He checked into another seedy motel, the Bonnie Lee Inn, where the manager helpfully introduced him to the residents who could hook him up with drug and gun dealers. One gun dealer offered to sell him AK-47s and rocket-propelled grenades. Meanwhile, LAPD undercover officers were infiltrating Ghost Town from the bottom up. This was not easy because the drug organization had years of experience in evading undercover operations. They would post lookouts and do countersurveillance on the police. Dealers like Shane Sprewell would only sell to users they knew. For more risky sales, they turned to “hooks,” who had less to lose. One of them was Juan Villegas, a homeless man. Villegas would stand on Pacific Coast Highway and attract buyers. When he found one, he would take their money, go to one of the known drug houses in Ghost Town and come back with crack. Sometimes he would take his payment by pinching off a small rock for himself. Villegas was not selective about his customers, and the undercover officers had an easy time buying from him. But instead of arresting him immediately, they built up his trust. In time, they were able to use him the way the ATF informant had used Reed: as a conduit to other dealers. (Villegas has pleaded guilty and been sentenced to three years in state prison. His attorney also declined to comment. “What’s in the record speaks for itself,” he said.) Villegas led the undercover officers to Ivan Neely. Neely was a recent parolee who drove a Lexus and seemed to aspire to bigger things. He was nearly caught in the federal investigation when he tried to get in on a deal to sell four ounces of crack – or more than 100 grams – to the informant. His girlfriend, who had arranged the deal, said she cut him out of it to “avoid drama.” (The girlfriend, Jinett Sedano, has agreed to plead to a federal charge.) LAPD officers watched Neely exchange drugs with Villegas from his home. They saw that he kept his stash hidden in the ivy by his back wall, near a converted garage. After building trust with Villegas, the undercover officer convinced him to introduce him to Neely. Neely met the undercover officer on May 10 and was initially skeptical. He said the cop looked like a member of “the Grizzly Adams crew,” referring to the Harbor Area undercover officers. He overcame his doubts, however, and sold him half an ounce. Before they parted, Neely warned the officer to be careful because there were cops in the area and told Villegas to hide the drugs between his buttocks. Because police said he was only caught dealing in smaller quantities, Neely faces only state charges. His attorney, Robin Perry, said he plans to contest them. “They cast a very large net in their efforts to secure this particular area,” Perry said. “We believe they caught a lot of innocent persons within that net.” Perry said that his client is an R&B artist who grew up singing in church and has plans to record a CD. He also disputed the idea that the families were involved in a lucrative operation, saying that Neely’s family didn’t even have the means to post his $110,000 bail. “Most of the families who we’re talking about, to the extent there’s illegal activity, they’re small-time drug dealers,” Perry said. “I don’t believe this is sort of a Mafia presence.” East Side Pain might have little in common with Italian mobsters, but they did share an emphasis on family. Neely is the nephew of Linda Hodge and Robert Jordan Sr., and the cousin of Ashley Jordan, all of whom were also arrested in the Ghost Town sweep. “They were definitely all about family and all about community,” Detective Jordan said. “The drugs were there to support the family but also the gang, because they’re one and the same.” Another cousin of Neely’s, a young girl, appeared to be getting involved early in the family business. “She tried to help our undercover officer buy narcotics,” Jordan said. “We’d consistently see their kids. One was probably 10 years old and the other was 14. It was just common.” The families tried not to compete with each other for customers. On May 3, investigators watched Shane Sprewell do three hand-to-hand deals in an hour, and then get in his car and leave. A few minutes later, another dealer came out of his house a block down the street, and opened for business. They were apparently cooperating by staggering their hours. With such close bonds, word of undercover activity got around quickly. Soon they began to alter their behavior in response. Sprewell held weekly meetings of East Side Pain members at his home every Saturday. “S-Dog,” as he was known, had been arrested before, in November 2005. He told detectives at the time that he sold “a sack” of narcotics per week “to make extra money.” Evidently, he was not eager to go back to jail. He was last seen in the area on July1. He made five sales in three hours that day and hasn’t been heard from since. Others chose to stick around, but to be more careful. Soon after his encounter with the “Grizzly Adams crew,” Neely hung a sheet over his converted garage. The sheet blocked the view to surveillance officers, who could no longer tell if he was dealing drugs inside. Some modified their patterns in other ways. Hood told the ATF informant on June 6 that they couldn’t meet in Ghost Town because the neighborhood was “hot” with police activity. They met at a gas station on Rosecrans instead. The street dealers also became more suspicious, and even more selective about their customers. On July 3, undercover officers tried to buy from a relative of Shane Sprewell’s, but were told, “I don’t have anything. We don’t do that here.” The officers believed the relative had spotted an undercover police van. On July 7, Detective Jordan assembled a “buy team” to try to make undercover purchases. An undercover officer was turned down at six different locations. Jordan appeared to be growing concerned. “I regrouped with the `buy team’ and again told them that the sellers will not sell to anyone on foot they do not know, only if they are in a vehicle or on a bike,” she wrote in her affidavit. “I further stated those who are in a vehicle or on a bike must also follow certain actions in order to get a successful purchase.” Though the officers were still able to complete some undercover buys, the dealers had clearly tightened up their operation. Jordan decided it was time to wrap things up. “There’s always something that can unravel a case,” she said. “You have to be careful. It can be an additional job trying to protect it from being revealed.” Marvin Reed was the first to be arrested, on July 22, in an unrelated case out of Long Beach. Reed, who had stopped paying his weekly payoff to the Catalina Motel, had been forced to move in May to the Palm Motel in Harbor City and to switch crack suppliers. He will be at a county jail in Saugus for the next few months. After that, the ATF has claimed him. The federal charges against him remain under seal. Five hundred officers took part in the raid that began at 4 a.m. July 31. They searched 22 locations and made 43 arrests. They found $14,000 in cash, eight guns, some hollow-point ammunition, a red baseball bat with the letters “ESP” written on it, gang photos, a welfare ID card, a payroll card from the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, and significant quantities of marijuana and crack. At a news conference, leaders of the various agencies hailed their cooperation with each other and vowed to build a better neighborhood in Ghost Town. “Make no mistake,” Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said, “we are here for the long term.” Following the pattern established with the East Coast Crips, the City Attorney’s Office has sought abatement actions against three homes, an apartment complex, and a motel, while the U.S. Attorney’s Office has launched proceedings to seize five other properties, including the Catalina Motel and Sprewell’s house. The detectives know they didn’t get everybody. And it remains to be seen how much will really change. Robin Perry, Neely’s attorney, said he believed the investigation had been a disappointment to the LAPD. “It’s really bogus,” he said. “What’s happening now is the authorities are trying to justify the funds spent on this investigation that turned up very little.” Officers have noted a lull in drug traffic. Now, the authorities are trying use that lull in activity to give neighbors a chance to reclaim Ghost Town for its law-abiding citizens. “This community has been held hostage for 30 years,” said Detective Jordan, who has since taken a new assignment with Internal Affairs. “Now the community members have an opportunity to enhance their community. It’s not just about law enforcement going out and doing their job. The community has to help.” gene.maddaus@dailybreeze.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! But the police were already there, and they were snapping pictures. It was Jan. 24, the first day of a seven-month investigation that would entail countless hours of surveillance and dozens of undercover drug buys. At the center of the case were two informants with long rap sheets and deep knowledge of the drug trade. Also integral to the operation were neighbors who were fed up with watching drug deals from their front windows, and who invited in the surveillance crews at risk of their own safety. By the end, the dealers had sensed they were being watched. They were no longer selling in plain sight from their lawn chairs, and had instead draped sheets and rugs to obstruct the view. When the sweep came, before dawn July 31, Shane Sprewell had left town. He and two of his family members remain fugitives. This account of the investigation comes from hundreds of pages of search warrant affidavits and other public records, as well as interviews with investigators and defense attorneys. What emerges is a portrait of a neighborhood where drug dealing is a family business, where children are brought up in the trade and expected someday to take it over, and where nothing could be more casual or commonplace. The investigation began with two women: Cmdr. Joan McNamara, a former narcotics detective who has been a trailblazer for female officers in the Los Angeles Police Department; and LAPD Detective Alisha Jordan, a former undercover officer who still shuns the spotlight. (She only reluctantly agreed to be interviewed for this story. It was the first time she had talked to a reporter.) last_img
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