LacMegantic residents say wrong people accused company responsible for disaster

first_imgMONTREAL – A Quebec man whose kid sister was one of 47 people killed in the Lac-Megantic tragedy says the three men acquitted Friday should have never been put on trial.“I think, very sincerely, that since the day of the accident, these people have been living in purgatory and it must have been extremely difficult,” Bernard Boulet told The Canadian Press. “I’m happy these three people are free.”A jury found Tom Harding, Richard Labrie and Jean Demaitre not guilty of criminal negligence causing the death of 47 people in connection with the July 2013 train derailment and subsequent explosion.Boulet says he agrees with the verdicts.“It was an unfortunate accident,” said Boulet, himself a former railway traffic controller. “It was caused by nonchalance and an accumulation of events — by the nonchalance of the (rail company) owner, Edward Burkhardt.”Before and during the trial, defence lawyers and Lac-Megantic residents often brought up Burkhardt’s name.They insinuated it was he who was primarily responsible for the tragedy in his role as chairman of the now-defunct, Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway, which owned the train and the tracks on which it derailed.Reached by telephone at his office outside Chicago shortly after Friday’s verdicts were announced, Burkhardt told The Canadian Press he wasn’t surprised to hear people were suggesting he should have been the one on trial.“There were a lot of people screaming for people — including me — to stand trial and all that,” he said.“The police and the prosecutors made a thorough investigation of what happened and so did the (Transportation Safety Board of Canada), and they concluded (if) there was going to be a prosecution it would be limited to the people that they brought, and I can’t say more than that.”Burkhardt became public enemy No. 1 in the days following the crash, when his blunt, sometimes unsentimental remarks drew the ire of the grieving public.His brief stop in Lac-Megantic is perhaps best remembered for his tumultuous news conference, during which he was heckled by angry locals.Burkhardt points out he lost his investments in the company’s bankruptcy and that he agreed to settle in a civil suit brought against him even though he doesn’t feel he was personally responsible for the tragedy.He did not say how much money he paid in the settlement.“Everything I’d done with respect to that company was to try to enforce stricter and stronger safety standards, and the fact that it all came unglued that day was just horrible,” he said, adding he and everyone involved still lives with the burden of what happened.The Transportation Safety Board of Canada’s investigation into the derailment somewhat contradicts Burkhardt, however.Its final report concluded, “There were also significant gaps between (MMA’s) operating instructions and how work was done day to day.“This and other signs in MMA’s operations were indicative of a weak safety culture — one that contributed to the continuation of unsafe conditions and unsafe practices, and significantly compromised the company’s ability to manage risk.”Jean Clusiault, whose daughter Kathy died in the disaster, said he, too, was satisfied with the verdicts.“The wrong people were accused,” he said outside the courthouse in Sherbrooke, Que. “The jury came back with the right verdict.”Clusiault, who followed the trial closely, said the U.S.-based management of MMA should have been charged.With the trial over, he said, “my daughter will always be in my mind.”Julie Morin, mayor of Lac-Megantic, said neither she nor the citizens of the 6,000-person town thought the three people accused were solely responsible for the tragedy.“The company, MMA, had a big role to play in this,” Morin, who was not mayor back in 2013, said in a phone interview. “It’s impossible that three men alone created what happened to us.”What her citizens want to focus on now, she said, is getting a bypass track that would move trains away from the core of the town, something the federal government is studying but has not yet promised to do.“There is still a lot to do — the entire downtown was destroyed,” Morin said.“There are people looking for financing to start projects, there is a lot of great work being done and it would be nice to get some attention on this rather than the trial.”last_img read more

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Trump assails Canadian tariffs accuses people of smuggling US goods home

first_imgOTTAWA – U.S. President Donald Trump is accusing Canadians of buying products south of the border, then sneaking them back home — all because of what he calls “massive” tariffs on American goods.Trump, speaking to a gathering of small business owners in Washington, is railing again against the North American Free Trade Agreement, saying the U.S. can no longer afford to be the “stupid country.”He says Canada imposes such onerous tariffs on U.S. products — shoes, for instance — that people are forced to “scuff ’em up” in order to “smuggle” them home.Trump says he’s looking out for American farmers and manufacturers, and again takes issue with Canada’s supply management system for dairy farmers.His comments as the official Opposition calls for an emergency debate in the House of Commons over the future of the Canada-U.S. trade.Conservative foreign affairs critic Erin O’Toole says Canadians need to see their elected representatives addressing what is the biggest economic crisis in their lifetime — but Commons Speaker Geoff Regan says the issue doesn’t meet the requirements for an emergency debate.last_img read more

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IBC resolution plans have yielded 200 of liquidation value

first_imgNew Delhi: Resolution plans under IBC have yielded 200 per cent of liquidation value for creditors in addition to rescuing viable firms, IBBI Chairperson M S Sahoo has said. “They are realising, on an average, 45 per cent of their claims through resolutions plans under the Corporate Insolvency Resolution Process (CIRP), which takes on average 300 days and entails a cost on average of 0.5 per cent. “This is significantly better as compared to the previous regime which yielded a recovery of 25 per cent for creditors through a process which took about five years and entailed a cost of 9 per cent,” Sahoo was quoted as saying in a Ficci statement. Addressing a conference on Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code (IBC) at Hong Kong on Thursday, he observed that “in addition to rescuing viable firms, which is the sole objective of IBC; resolution plans under IBC have yielded 200 per cent of liquidation value for creditors.” Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalHe noted that the repayment of debt is no longer an option, it is an obligation as tolerance for default has disappeared. “A stakeholder may initiate CIRP of the firm when it fails to service its debt for the first time. If process is initiated, the Code shifts control from the debtor to creditors for resolution of insolvency. “Through the process of resolution, the ownership often shifts to third parties. Thus, ownership of firm is no more a divine right and equity is no more the only route to own a company,” the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Board of India Chairperson said. He said the creditors also need to explain to themselves and their stakeholders why they initiated an insolvency proceeding or why they did not, in case of a default. Consequently, there would never be a high value default if this law exists in the statute book. Sahoo acknowledged the support of the judiciary, government and the regulators in facilitating implementation of the Code, both in letter and spirit. He explained that markets regulator Sebi has exempted acquisitions under resolution plans from making public offers under the Takeover Code.last_img read more

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Moroccan Police Arrest 6 People Trafficking Historical Objects

Rabat- On a joint mission on Monday, the National Brigade of Judicial Police (BNPJ) and Oujda’s Prefectural Police Department arrested six individuals in connection with crimes of jewelry trafficking, including a mining company practising illegal mining and “trafficking historical objects.”The police seized 128 ancient silver coins, 17 plastic bags filled with lead and copper, equipments used for excavating and melting objects, and a sum of MAD 359,700 that the suspects were in possession of, reported the General Directorate of National Security (DGSN).The suspects are currently undergoing police investigation. According to law 22.80 on the protection and preservation of Morocco’s cultural heritage, including historical buildings, antiques, and inscriptions, researchers who wish to explore must request authorization at least six months in advance.As for the excavation of archeological sites, Morocco’s Ministry of Culture and Communication stressed in September that researchers must request government permission before excavating archeological sites.Read Also: Sound Energy Fails to Find Producible Gas at Tendrara TE-9 Well in MoroccoSome individuals illegally excavated private property or state property in search of treasure or other materials of significant value, and they even vandalized historical sites.In 2017, groups of “treasure hunters” vandalized Gantrat El Fellous and Dar Oum Sultan, two historical sites in the rural commune of Ait Sibern that lies between Rabat and Fez, according to national heritage management officials.Gantrat El Fellous is a historic bridge and an architectural monument built by the Almohad Dynasty in the 12th century. read more

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Cyclone to move away this afternoon

Seas off the coast extending from Mannar to Trinconalee via Jaffna and Mullattivu will experience strong winds, very rough conditions and intermittent rain. Therefore fishing and naval community are further advised to refrain from maritime activities in these seas. The situation is being closely monitored by the Department of Meteorology. (Colombo Gazette) The cyclonic storm in the South-west Bay of Bengal was located about 100Km east of Mulattivu coast at midnight and is likely to move in a west-northwestward direction and move away from Sri Lanka area after 1200 noon today, the early warning center of the Department of Meteorology said.Heavy rain and strong winds will continue in the North-central, Northern, Eastern and North-western provinces. Other areas of the island will also receive rain with heavy falls at some places. read more

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UN receives International Documentary Association award for its archives

“This award comes to us at a critical and challenging time in the Organization’s history,” said Ahmad Fawzi, the Director of the Department of Public Information’s News and Media Division, accepting the award at a ceremony on Friday in Los Angeles, California.“As we approach our 60th birthday, we are grappling with questions about the relevance and effectiveness of the international system we all created, questions of when to go to war and how to build peace, questions of collective security while we continue our humanitarian mission of fighting hunger, poverty, disease and environmental degradation.”Mr. Fawzi paid tribute to all those who had catalogued and secured footage and sound elements covering the UN’s work at Headquarters and overseas. “They have carefully preserved this material and maintained its accessibility under somewhat constrained physical and financial circumstances,” he said.The News and Media Division chief also pledged that the UN “will persevere in preserving and documenting the past, present and future of this global organization that is truly relevant to our time.”Hundreds of hours of footage shot by UN producers have been transferred to a digital format for preservation, and to off-site storage as a security measure. read more

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UN mission in Côte dIvoire welcomes disarmament plan from western militias

According to the UN Operation in Côte d’Ivoire (UNOCI), the groups that have agreed on the disarmament plan include the Union of Patriots for Resistance in the Great West (UPERGO), the Association of Wé Patriots (AP-WE) and the Great West Liberation Front (FLGO).The statement came as the Secretary-General’s Special Representative (SRSG) and UNOCI chief, Pierre Schori, and the UN election representative, Antonio Monteiro, ended a brief visit to South Africa where they met with President Thabo Mbeki, who is also the African Union (AU) mediator for Côte d’Ivoire.Fighting erupted in Côte d’Ivoire in 2002 when rebels seeking to oust President Laurent Gbagbo seized the north, dividing the world’s largest cocoa producer in two. Last year the Security Council set up UNOCI, which, along with French Licorne forces, maintains a ceasefire between Government forces, ruling the south of the country, and the major rebel group, Forces Nouvelles, controlling the north. read more

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University of Liberia sets up Kofi Annan Institute for Conflict Transformation

“Not so many years ago Liberia was spoken of as the epicentre of instability in the region,” UN Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) Officer-in-Charge Luiz Carlos da Costa said at the ceremony in Monrovia, the capital. “It is now time to reverse that label and for Liberia to demonstrate, by example, that it can be the regional centre of stability and development.”KAICT, established in honour of the Secretary-General’s valuable contributions to conflict resolution and transformation in Africa, particularly in Liberia, can serve as an important centre of learning for the entire West Africa sub-region and beyond, he added. It will fulfil the essential and vital role of educating and teaching, which can restore the soul of the country. “Only through the in-depth study of the root causes of past problems, the reaching of understanding in inter-group relations and the commitment of an educated corps of persons can nations be built,” Mr. da Costa declared. Kings College, London, the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre in Accra, Ghana, are amongst organizations already contributing resources and personnel for the establishment of KAICT. When fully established, it will award Master of Arts degrees in Conflict Transformation.Performing the inauguration ceremony, Vice President Joseph Boakai said the launch was a practical manifestation of Liberia’s desire for long-lasting peace.“We should learn to beat our swords into ploughshares. We are all aware that conflict is a human phenomenon that brings out contradictions and these contradictions can be transformed into meaningful and positive initiatives that benefit humanity,” he added. read more

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Starbucks cuts outlook as world economy struggles chain has challenges in Europe

NEW YORK, N.Y. – Starbucks Corp. on Thursday reported third-quarter net income that fell short of Wall Street expectations and cut its outlook for the current quarter, citing the challenging global economy.Its shares fell 9.6 per cent in after-hours trading.The Seattle-based coffee giant said net income rose 19 per cent during the quarter, as global revenue at cafes open at least a year rose 6 per cent. The increase in the metric, which is important to retailers because it excludes the effect of recently opened and closed stores, was driven by growth in China and Asia and the Americas. In the European market, where Starbucks has been struggling to turn around its business, the figure was flat.“Europe has been a challenge for us all year and continues to be,” said Troy Alstead, the company’s chief financial officer. But he noted that the flat sales were an improvement from the previous quarter, when the figure slipped 1 per cent.To perk up its business in the region, Starbucks has been instituting measures similar to those it took during the downturn in the U.S. a few years ago, such as introducing loyalty programs and improving service. CEO Howard Schultz has said he’s confident the measures will prove successful.Still, the company says its store expansions next year will be focused in the United States and the fast-growing China market.For the three months ended July 1, the company said it earned $333.1 million, or 43 cents per share. That’s compared with $279.1 million, or 36 cents per share, a year ago.Total revenue rose 13 per cent to $3.3 billion.Analysts on average expected a profit of 45 cents per share on revenue of $3.34 billion.Starbucks said the higher revenue was the result of increased customer traffic and customers spending more per visit.For the current quarter, Starbucks cut its profit outlook to 44 cents to 45 cents per share from a range of 46 cents to 47 cents per share. Analysts were predicting 48 cents per share.Shares dropped $5 to $47.40 in after-hours trading. During the trading day, shares had gained $1.99, or 4 per cent, close at $52.40. by News Staff Posted Jul 26, 2012 5:11 pm MDT Starbucks cuts outlook as world economy struggles, chain has challenges in Europe; shares dive AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email read more

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Sega delays Anarchy Reigns again GTA V to blame

first_imgCreated by the makers of Bayonetta and Vanquish, Anarchy Reigns is an over the top online multiplayer fighter set in a post-apocolyptic future in a huge open world. Fans have been waiting months for the game to release, but much to their disappointment, Sega has delayed it yet again, this time pushing it back into 2013 for Europe and the US.Gamers aren’t the only ones annoyed, as developer Platinum games expressed their anger over Twitter, stating they have finished every single regional version of Anarchy Reigns. The delay is purely Sega’s decision, but why?Anarchy Reigns was first delayed back in May, despite the game being already finished. And Japan will still get the game on July 5th. I’m guessing here, but it’s possible the reason Sega has pushed Anarchy Reigns into Q1 2013 is the very same reason why lots of other publishers have decided to adjust their new release schedules: Grand Theft Auto V.Bioshock Infinite, Tomb Raider, Ni No Kuni and, The Last of Us are just some of the games that will be arriving early next year rather than in time for the holidays. If GTA V does come out this autumn, it will probably easily out-sell any other game that’s released during the holiday period in the US and Europe. Whereas it’s unlikely the Japanese market will remain unaffected.There is still no official release date for GTA V, but understandably publishers are obviously wary about what is likely to happen and won’t risk lost sales on key titles.It’s not all bad news, though. After recieving all that money at Christmas you’ll have a lot of choice on which games to spend it on in the usual post-New Year lull.via MCVlast_img read more

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A champion for women in the music industry

first_img“Today we celebrate International Women’s Day 2017. To my mother and aunty who fled civil war to come to Australia. They have a lived experience of hardship and racism that I never had to endure. To my paternal great grandmother who was the first university educated woman from her island of Samos and held the most powerful position of Maritime Customs Officer. To my family that fought against fascism and injustice. To my Aboriginal sisters that welcome me to their land yet still suffer through colonization. To my sisters and confidants who hold me, push me, console me. Thank you, I celebrate you.” Helen Marcou posted this on her Facebook page, on Wednesday, as a heartfelt tribute to the women who inspired her. On that day, there were countless other such posts, mentioning her own name as a source of inspiration. For Helen Marcou is one of the most beloved and respected members of Melbourne’s arts and culture community, a matron saint of artists and musicians and a champion for women in the music industry. Her Women’s day post came little after her own induction to the Victorian Honour Roll of Women, alongside 24 other brave, active, groundbreaking, inspiring women whose work and presence makes a difference to the community. “This is an incredible honour for me”, she says. “It’s recognition for a lot of voluntary work that I have been doing for close to a decade now, which has never really been about awards but public recognition makes me feel valued. For activists like myself, this is important, because we usually see the impact of our work in changes to regulatory framework, so this gives me a lot of encouragement. If you look at the list of 600 women in Victoria who have been honoured so far, it’s a hefty list of incredible contributors to the State, to the country and internationally. Although the work I do is really cantered around music, arts, culture and community, this makes me feel connected to something broader, that I’m not out on a satellite of my own”. That’s, of course, what music does, as an element that brings people together in a community, strengthening the social fabric. “Absolutely”, she agrees. “And that’s why I was drawn to music in the first place”. For the most part, Helen has been active in the industry as the co-owner and manager (along with her partner, Quincy McLean) of the acclaimed ‘Bakehouse Studios’, one of the main hubs for musicians to master their craft.Her transformation from studio manager to activist is well documented; she was the driving force behind the Save Live Australian Music campaign which saw more than 20,000 people (artists, music professionals, fans and punters) marching to express their opposition to a Liquor Licencing law that had marked small music venues as “high risk”, linking them with violence. “Quincy and I had our music studios, we were working over many years and we got to know our community really well”, she remembers. “So when our community and our live music culture was at threat, we decided, as independent people to take action and start a movement. At the time we were really naive, we thought we do the rally and go home, that the policy makers would make policy and we could get on with our lives,” she laughs talking about her “quick learning curve” as an activist. “I realised that when you find a problem and you present it to the government, you also have to present the solution; and that’s when we engaged with experts within our community to write the policy and present new ways of doing things – it was an education for me”. Fast forward seven years down the track and Helen Marcou is sitting on a number of committees and advisory panels, offering consultation. What’s more important, she’s been using her position of privilege, as an established woman in the music industry who has the ear of the government as well as the respect of her peers to raise awareness for incidents of sexual harassment and sexual assault in licenced venues. “I felt morally obliged to do so”, she says. “When I see a problem, my inclination is to make change, rather than wait for someone else to step in and fix it, because generally, they won’t”. So, she stepped in and in 2015, she was instrumental in the formation of the Victorian Government’s ‘Sexual Assault and Harassment of Women in Licensed Venues Taskforce’. “We’re about to roll out a program to train venues and security staff and also launch an awareness campaign”, she says. “For me, sexual harassment has been the biggest issue in our industry for a long time and it still is. There are a lot of performers, particularly women and LGBTQI people who go out in their workplace and suffer harassment, which is dissuading for them”. Ultimately, the task force actions “would result in more participation of women in the culture”, both as performers and audience ensuring them “a dignified night out” in safer and more inclusive spaces. “That’s how I see my role, in making sure that threats to music are eradicated and that we can enjoy our culture without regulation that gets in the way or any other barriers”, she says, describing how her Greek background affected her conduct as an activist. Greeks tell it like it is”, she laughs. “There are no formalities, no holding back. That has given me a lot of bravado and put me into situations where a lot of people would fear to tread for fear of offending people or stepping on toes. Although I’m respectful of people’s feelings, when it comes to activism or a fight with government I have no fear”. Overall, her experience has been a journey of self-discovery. “I learned that I had capabilities I never could imagine”, she says. “I didn’t go to university, I only finished year 12 and yet, years later I’ve been immersed in regulatory policy and all sorts of discussion around the arts sector, at top level,” she says. “In a few weeks I’ll be in Toronto, where I’m invited as a keynote speaker in their Music Week. So what I’ve learned is that with encouragement I can achieve so much. I owe a lot of it to my partner, Quincy, who supported me, and to my parents who are also like that. They always told me I can do anything. That’s why it’s important to surround yourself with people who enable you for positive change, rather than think you can’t do things”. This is why establishing role models is important. “Part of the reason I offer my voice and step up is because I was encouraged by other women who told that if I didn’t do it, other women wouldn’t have role models, there won’t be anyone there for them”, she says. “We have to keep paving the way”. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

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Researchers Develop 10Minute Test to Detect Cancer

first_img Watch: Dolphin Leaps Feet Away From Unsuspecting SurferNASA Says 2 Asteroids Will Safely Fly By Earth This Weekend Australian researchers have developed a ground-breaking, 10-minute cancer test that might aid patient diagnosis in the future.The test, which is said to easily detect cancer from blood or biopsy tissue, was created by University of Queensland researchers Dr. Abu Sina, Dr. Laura Carrascosa, and professor Matt Trau. The group, which discovered a unique DNA nanostructure that is present in various types of cancer, published their research in Nature Communications and a press release.According to Dr. Sina, each type of cancer has a different signature, and it can be hard to find a signature that’s common to all cancers and different from healthy cells.“This unique nano-scaled DNA signature appeared in every type of breast cancer we examined, and in other forms of cancer including prostate, colorectal, and lymphoma,” Sina said in the press release. “The levels and patterns of tiny molecules called methyl groups that decorate DNA are altered dramatically by cancer – these methyl groups are key for cells to control which genes are turned on and off.”Professor Matt Trau, Dr. Abu Sina, and Doctor Laura Carrascosa (Photo Credit: University of Queensland)To further study methyl groups, the team created a tool that could study these pattern changes at the entire genome level in a few minutes. The team found that methyl group clusters placed in a solution prompted cancer DNA fragments to fold into 3D nanostructures. These 3D nanostructures could then be separated when they stick to solid surfaces, like gold.These gold nanoparticles play an important part in cancer detection. If 3D nanostructures of cancer DNA exist, the gold nanoparticles will instantly change color. According to Trau, cancer cells released their DNA into blood plasma when they perished.Cancer Cells (Photo Credit: Pixabay)“We certainly don’t know yet whether it’s the holy grail for all cancer diagnostics, but it looks really interesting as an incredibly simple universal marker of cancer, and as an accessible and inexpensive technology that doesn’t require complicated lab-based equipment like DNA sequencing,” Trau said in the press release.This small test could be a big deal for cancer diagnosis in upcoming years, because it enables researchers to non-invasively detect cancer in blood and tissue. This new technology, which was shown to be up to 90 percent accurate in testing with normal DNA and 200 human cancer samples, could be turned into portable detection tools down the line.The researchers are working with UniQuest, a commercializing company, to further develop and eventually license the technology. Additionally, the research was supported by a National Breast Cancer Foundation grant to advance cancer diagnosis testing.More on Geek.com:First Baby Born Via Uterus Transplant From Deceased DonorFace Transplant Patient Reveals New Look 10 Months After SurgeryDoctors to Start Prescribing ‘Museum Art’ for Better Health Stay on targetlast_img read more

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Amazon Alexa Stops Working After Christmas Day Overload

first_img Amazon’s Alexa wasn’t in the holiday spirit: The virtual voice assistant recently crashed due to a Christmas Day overload.On Tuesday, thousands of customers who plugged in Alexa-enabled products experienced an Alexa outage in Europe, The Guardian reported. Servers controlling Alexa became overloaded with too many questions and requests, which caused Alexa to tell some customers, “Sorry, I’m having trouble understanding you right now.”The crash occurred at approximately 5:00 a.m. EST on Tuesday, prompting Amazon customers to complain on Twitter about not being able to play holiday music, receive recipe instructions for dinner, or control other smart home devices.“Sorry, I’m having trouble understanding right now. Please try a little later”. Oh dear, all those new Echos being unwrapped must be too much for Amazon to cope with. #alexa— Kevin Wittering (@KevinWittering) December 25, 2018Amazon responded to the Alexa outage issue a few hours later on Twitter, and explained that the virtual voice assistant overload might have caused connectivity issues for some customers in Europe. The company also wrote that the crash issues have been fixed and that Alexa is working again on Alexa-enabled devices.Hey there. Over the past two hours some Echo devices in Europe have had intermittent connections. These issues have now been resolved and the Alexa Service is working normally. ^RY— Amazon Help (@AmazonHelp) December 25, 2018This isn’t Amazon’s first Alexa hiccup either: Earlier this month, Amazon accidentally sent 1,700 Alexa recordings to a random customer in Germany who was expecting his own information from the company. The recordings captured some private details about another customer, including his first and last name and his music preferences. Amazon apologized for the information mishap, and said it’s working with local authorities to prevent future data leaks.More on Geek.com:Amazon Accidentally Sent 1,700 Alexa Recordings to a Random PersonParrot ‘Falls in Love’ With Amazon Alexa, Uses It to Order TreatsAmazon Music Customers Can Now Casually Chat With Alexa Amazon Employees Join Sept. 20 Global Climate WalkoutGeek Pick: Amazon Smart Plug Puts Alexa in Your Walls Stay on targetlast_img read more

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Police Device on bank ATM emptied several accounts

first_imgThe Woodland Police Department has received several calls from victims of fraud whose bank accounts were cleared out by a skimmer placed on an ATM at a credit union. Police learned about the skimmer after receiving the calls, said Police Chief James Kelly. It is unclear if the skimmer was discovered beforehand, as the devices can be hard to spot.A skimmer is a device generally affixed to the mouth of an ATM, and it surreptitiously swipes credit and debit card information when bank customers insert their cards into the machines. There are also pieces placed on top of cash withdrawal slots that record people putting in their bank codes.The skimmer at Fibre Federal Credit Union, 1147 N. Goerig St., Woodland, may have been on the cash machine as early as July 29, but it was only discovered over the weekend, Kelly said. It is not in police possession, as the device was gone when the police department learned about it.Anyone affected by the skimmer should report it to the police department, as well as call the bank and cancel their debit or credit cards.last_img read more

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SAIHOU EXTENDS CLUB CONTRACT

first_imgBy Sulayman BahGambian forward Saihou Jagne has renewed his club contract, Foroyaa Sport can report.Jagne who joined the club last summer from Norwegian club Brikerieke adds few more months to his deal after the end of his initial term.The Gambian’s countryman Alagie Sosseh played for six months with Brikerieke before sealing off a move to Monjalen now in the top flight.28-year-old Jagne was expected to follow in a similar routine before he dramatically opted to return to Sweden to join Ange IF.His renewed contract with Ange, a club in the fourth division of Sweden, runs till the end of this forthcoming league campaign.Saihou, brother to retired Gambian player Alieu Jagne, is capped once with the Gambia senior team in a friendly match defeat to Equatorial Guinea in 2010.The attacker was once the most sought after football star in Sweden courting the attention of Turkish club Trasnzespor.]]>last_img read more

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Direct bus services to Ramappa in Warangal

first_imgWarangal: The historic Ramappa temple that is vying for UNESCO’s World Heritage Site tag has finally got a direct bus service from Hanamkonda on Sunday. Surprisingly, there was no direct bus from Warangal to 800-year-old temple in Palampet village of Mulugu district this far. Thanks to Palampet Sarpanch Doli Rajitha who wrote a letter to the RTC regional manager A Sridhar explaining the importance of plying bus services between Ramappa and Warangal. Against this backdrop, the TSRTC officials have decided to run bus service on Sundays and on all public holidays. Also Read – Vemulawada school seized after road accident Advertise With Us The villagers gave a rousing welcome when the bus reached Ramappa on Sunday. The timings of bus: Starts at 8.30 am in Hanamkonda and reaches Ramappa by 10. 10 am. The return journey begins at 3.40 pm and reaches Hanamkonda by 5.20 pm. The fare for an adult is Rs 65 and for the children it is Rs 35. Sarpanch thanked the RTC officials for heeding to her request. Venkatapura SI B Narahari and vice sarpanch M Jayashankar were among others present.last_img read more

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Can art keep drawing in investors

first_imgCan art keep drawing in investors?307 views00:00 / 00:00- 00:00:0000:00Can art keep drawing in investors?307 viewsBusinessVisitors to a Swiss art gallery say their fond farewells. To a long-time resident – now global star. Gauguin’s masterpiece When Will You Marry is moving on to shows in Madrid and Washington. ThenVentuno Web Player 4.50Visitors to a Swiss art gallery say their fond farewells. To a long-time resident – now global star. Gauguin’s masterpiece When Will You Marry is moving on to shows in Madrid and Washington. Thenlast_img read more

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Bangladesh Tree Man now wants hands amputated

first_imgAbul Bajandar , 28, dubbed `Tree Man` for massive bark-like warts on his hands and feet, sits at Dhaka Medical College Hospital in Dhaka on 24 June, 2019. Photo: AFPA Bangladeshi known as the “Tree Man” because of bark-like growths on his body said Monday he wanted his hands amputated to relieve him of unbearable pain.Abul Bajandar has had 25 operations since 2016 to remove growths from his hands and feet caused by a rare syndrome.Doctors had believed they had beaten the disease but Bajandar fled a Dhaka clinic in May last year following a relapse.The 28-year-old father of one was readmitted to hospital in January because the condition worsened, with some growths several inches long.Abul Bajandar , 28, dubbed `Tree Man` for massive bark-like warts on his hands and feet, sits at Dhaka Medical College Hospital in Dhaka on 24 June, 2019. Photo: AFP”I cannot bear the pain anymore. I can’t sleep at night. I asked the doctors to cut off my hands so I can at least get some relief,” he told AFP.His mother Amina Bibi supported the plea. “At least he will be free of pain. It’s a hellish condition,” she told AFP.Bajander suffers from epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a rare genetic condition also known as “tree man syndrome”.Bajandar said he wanted to go abroad for better treatment, but he does not have the money to cover the expenses.Samanta Lal Sen, the chief plastic surgeon at Dhaka Medical College Hospital, said a board of seven doctors will discuss Bajandar’s condition on Tuesday.”He gave his personal opinion. But we will do whatever is the best solution for him,” said Sen.Abul Bajandar , 28, dubbed `Tree Man` for massive bark-like warts on his hands and feet, sits at Dhaka Medical College Hospital in Dhaka on 24 June, 2019. Photo: AFPPrime Minister Sheikh Hasina promised free treatment for Bajandar after his plight made national and international headlines.Bajander lived in the hospital’s private wing for nearly two years during his first round of treatment.Fewer than half a dozen people around the world are believed to have the syndrome.The hospital also treated a young Bangladeshi girl suffering from the condition in 2017.Doctors declared her surgery a success, but her father later said the growths had returned in even greater numbers and the family halted the treatment and returned to their village.last_img
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Mother Emanuels forgiveness narrative is complicated says reporterturnedau …

first_img Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — Four years ago on June 17, when Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church became national news, Jennifer Berry Hawes was one of the first reporters on the scene to cover the massacre.Now Hawes, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter at The Post and Courier in Charleston, S.C., has written “Grace Will Lead Us Home,” a book about the shooting that left its pastor, the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, and eight members dead and many more lives irreparably changed.Hawes, a former religion writer, named the book after a portion of the hymn “Amazing Grace” — which President Obama sang at Pinckney’s funeral. She spoke to Religion News Service about what people don’t know about the tragedy, how the church and community have changed, and the successes and challenges that have occurred with race relations.The interview was edited for length and clarity.You have covered the story of the Mother Emanuel AME massacre from the beginning. What are one or two key things that most people don’t know about this tragedy and its aftermath that you think they should know?I think probably the most important thing that most people don’t know is that while the narrative about the family members’ forgiveness gelled around this tragedy, the reality was that many of those who were very deeply affected in fact did not forgive (convicted killer) Dylann Roof. Certainly not right away. Instead, there were those who felt strongly that the narrative, while beautiful and inspiring, also took some of the wind from the sails of really pressing for meaningful changes that would address racism and racial disparities here. So it was much more complicated than that narrative would lead many people to believe.RELATED: As Emanuel AME documentary screens, survivors, families mull grief and gunsAre churches as segregated as ever in Charleston or has there been any kind of long-term change since the massacre?“Grace Will Lead Us Home” by Jennifer Berry Hawes. Cover courtesy of St. Martin’s PressThe churches themselves are as segregated as ever. What has changed is that there are efforts to bridge divides between the people in those churches. A good example is that Emanuel’s daughter church here, Mount Zion AME, sits right next to a historic white church called Grace Episcopal Church. These churches have sat side by side for generations and generations, one being predominantly white, one being predominantly black. After the shooting, the pastors of those two churches — and I should say one is Kylon Middleton, a man who was very close to Clementa Pinckney, the pastor of Emanuel who was killed — Rev. Middleton and the rector at Grace got together and they created this book study, which is very large. It can draw upward of a hundred people or more every Tuesday night and it’s a diverse group from those two congregations who get together and discuss books that have to do with race or essays. And then they discuss them in terms of their lives and it’s a way to bring people together, obviously more in just fellowship, but also to really try to have conversations about race that have just been avoided for generations and generations.Mother Emanuel has gone through a couple of pastors since the tragedy and has been questioned about how it handled the grief of the families of the survivors and the victims as well as the money donated on their behalf. How is it doing now?On the first anniversary, the bishop switched out the pastor of Emanuel and Rev. Eric Manning was assigned to the church. And he’s been there since. I think having one pastor there for a period of time has certainly helped bring some stability. I think there’s still considerable pain, for instance, with Felicia Sanders, who’s one of the survivors of the shooting. Her little granddaughter was there and also survived but the church never shared the money from donations specifically with the granddaughter. So, Felicia is left to pay for her medical bills and therapy without the aid of those donations, and that, I know, for her has been painful.Do you see that faith has played a role in any attempt at a new normal for the families and the victims?Jennifer Berry Hawes. Photo by Grace Beahm AlfordOh, for sure. I know a number of them have gone out and been speaking more in public, trying to embrace that idea. Anthony Thompson — he’s a pastor in another denomination whose wife, Myra, died in the shooting and he speaks a lot about the importance of forgiveness in the Christian faith and emphasizing those themes of love and grace. Felicia Sanders, the survivor I mentioned earlier, has spoken a lot about the concept of how all people, regardless of their race or ethnic background or whatever the division is that we can point to, everybody bleeds red. She says that a lot — we all bleed red, just as Jesus did on the cross. Polly Sheppard, one of the survivors, she recently went up to Tree of Life in Pittsburgh, site of the synagogue shooting there, and spoke to the congregation not only about forgiveness but also about her experience after the shooting, trying to tell them a little bit about what to expect next.You noted the different interpretations of how the massacre affected race relations in South Carolina. How would you describe that?If you were to ask that question of many white people in South Carolina, I think they would say — and actually, they’ve done surveys of this — that they feel that race relations were improved as a result of the shooting because there were shows of unity and lots of public discussions about race relations. But I think if you were to ask many African Americans in the state, you’d find the opposite of that. What they see is that there were no major policy changes that they were hoping for — things like addressing gun laws or addressing the policies that affect the tremendous racial disparities that we have here, and obviously across the rest of the country. So I think if you ask them, they would say that, in fact, those relations are worse or certainly that they’re disappointed that white leaders in the state haven’t done more to address the concerns. For instance, last session in our General Assembly, they tried to pass a hate crimes bill. South Carolina is one of the only states left that doesn’t have one. They weren’t able to pass it. And that was another frustration.You wrote about this tragedy as a journalist, but you have personal connections to the church and its neighborhood. How has your own perspective of Mother Emanuel and the city where you live changed since June 17, 2015?One of the closest relationships I have is that my children both went to the school that’s right across the street. So the church was just part of the landscape around the school. There’s a very large auditorium. There’s the main library. There’s Emanuel. There are several other large churches. Every time I would drop my kids off at school after this, I would pass right by the church en route to the newspaper and every day I would watch the change from the very, very large memorial — the flowers and all kinds of things were left outside. It would gradually shrink. And then there was nothing, really. And then there would gradually be a few more flowers here or there. I felt like I was watching this season of Emanuel every day.One of the key things I learned from this also that I think is important for people to know is that there’s not any one way that people process trauma. When you drop this kind of explosion into any family or house of worship or school or community, people react differently and that’s OK. I’ve certainly wondered a lot more how would I react if that was me. That’s for sure. TagsEmanuel Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church forgiveness homepage featured Jennifer Berry Hawes Mother Emanuel race race relations,You may also like By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Adelle M. Banks Adelle M. Banks, production editor and a national reporter, joined RNS in 1995. An award-winning journalist, she previously was the religion reporter at the Orlando Sentinel and a reporter at The Providence Journal and newspapers in the upstate New York communities of Syracuse and Binghamton.,Load Comments,Jerusalem pride parade draws thousands, guarded by police News • Photos of the Week Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! Share This! Share This! Share This! In St. Louis, former houses of worship are retooled to meet the city’s needs Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Catholicism Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts News Share This! By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email last_img read more

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Carbon nanotube logic device operates on subnanowatt power

first_img Citation: Carbon nanotube logic device operates on subnanowatt power (2013, September 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-09-carbon-nanotube-logic-device-subnanowatt.html Toward achieving one million times increase in computing efficiency The researchers, Michael L. Geier, et al., at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, have published their paper on the subnanowatt CNT logic in a recent issue of Nano Letters.”A modern-day integrated circuit has more than 1 billion transistors,” coauthor Mark C. Hersam, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry, and Medicine at Northwestern University, told Phys.org. “Consequently, the power dissipation per transistor needs to be very low in order for the entire circuit to have a reasonable power consumption. In fact, it is generally accepted that power consumption is the key limiting factor to achieving further increases in the complexity (i.e., number of transistors) in integrated circuits.”As the researchers explain, one of the biggest advantages of CMOS architecture is that it has intrinsically low power consumption. This benefit arises from the fact that, unlike other logic architectures, one of the two types of transistors (p-type or n-type) is turned off under steady state conditions in each logic gate in CMOS devices. In order to fully take advantage of this potential for extremely low power consumption, the p-type and n-type transistors need to have precisely tuned and well-separated threshold voltages, which are the voltage levels that determine whether the device is ON or OFF. So far, this issue of the threshold voltages has not been addressed, and the researchers here identified it as the key challenge limiting the realization of highly integrated CNT-based CMOS electronics.In their study, the researchers used a metal gate structure to achieve symmetric and clearly separated threshold voltages for p-type and n-type CNT transistors, resulting in the ultralow power consumption. In the static states, in which the device is either ON or OFF, power consumption is less than 0.1 nW. At the midpoint of the transfer state, when both p-type and n-type transistors are simultaneously in the ON state, the voltage reaches its peak at 10 nW. By connecting multiple CNT transistors in various configurations, the researchers demonstrated inverter, NAND and NOR logic gates. In the future, these gates can be integrated into complex circuits, where they can provide subnanowatt static power consumption along with the other advantages of CNTs, such as solution processability and flexibility.”We are now working on making more complicated circuits, where we will have substantially more transistors and cascaded logic gates,” Hersam said. “We also have an interest in combining carbon nanotubes with other emerging nanoelectronic materials in our lab (e.g., molybdenum disulfide [MoS2]).” © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. Illustrations of (a) the CNT CMOS inverter and (b) a cross-section of an individual CNT transistor, including a 25-nm-thick Ni gate that enables ultralow power consumption. (c) Atomic force microscopy image of the CNT film morphology in the transistor channel region. Credit: Geier, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Journal information: Nano Letters (Phys.org) —Researchers have demonstrated a new carbon nanotube (CNT)-based logic device that consumes just 0.1 nanowatts (nW) in its static ON and OFF states, representing the lowest reported value by 3 orders of magnitude for CNT-based CMOS logic devices. The device could serve as a building block for large-area, ultralow-power CNT logic circuits that can be used to realize a variety of nanoelectronics applications. Explore further More information: Michael L. Geier, et al. “Subnanowatt Carbon Nanotube Complementary Logic Enabled by Threshold Voltage Control.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/nl402478plast_img read more

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