4th Mohamed’s Enterprise/New Era Ent. Futsal tournament to kick-off November 24

first_imgWITH Mohamed’s Enterprise as their platinum sponsor, New Era Entertainment, will host the fourth edition of their annual Futsal Tournament at the Mackenzie Sports Club, Hard Court ,in Linden, from November 24 to December 26.The event, which was formally launched yesterday, will feature 25 of the country’s top teams; seven of which will come from Georgetown, in a ‘win or go home’ format, where the winner will pocket $500,000.Nazar Mohamed, proprietor of Mohamed’s Enterprise, stated that his entity will continue their sponsorship for as long as possible, since sports, more so in the Linden community, holds a very special place for him.Mohamed said his involvement in football dates back to over 25 years, having been one of the primary sponsor of the famed Kashif and Shanghai football tournament.According to Mohamed, to ensure the longevity of the event, more sponsors should come on board, especially since Futsal is a growing sport and is well received in Linden.Cell Smart, another sponsor of the tournament, through their representative, Linden Gomes, stated that they’re happy to once again be associated with the tournament, since it’s well-loved in the Linden community.Acting President of the Guyana Futsal Association (GFA), Kenrick Noel, pointed out that this year, saw the most Futsal tournament being played, and it is only fitting that the New Era Tournament bring the curtains down on a fruitful year for the sport.Wayne Forde, president of the Guyana Football Federation (GFF), said that despite not having an indoor facility, the sport of Futsal is very much alive in Linden, while pledging his Federation’s continued support in making the game more popular and properly administered.Sparta Boss, Meadowbrook, Customs, Bent Street and West Front Road ‘Gold is Money’ are among the city teams who will be participating in the event for the first time.Apart from the lucrative first place prize, the second place team will pick up $150,000, while third place is set to receive $50,000.last_img read more

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Lagos Badminton Classic Postponed Due to COVID-19

first_imgDuro IkhazuagbeAfrica’s biggest International badminton championship, the Lagos International Badminton Classics has been postponed due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.The classics was earlier billed to take place between July 1st -and 4th, 2020. President of the Badminton Federation of Nigeria (BFN), Francis Orbih The world governing body of the sport, Badminton World Federation (BWF) arrived the decision to shift the tournament as a way to ensure players and officials are safe from the ravaging disease.President of the Badminton Federation of Nigeria (BFN), Francis Orbih confirmed the postponement to THISDAY last night.“Following series of communication with the Badminton Federation of Nigeria (BFN), the Badminton Confederation Africa (BCA) and the Lagos State Government through the Lagos State Sports Commission, the best possible way to keep players, coaches, officials and even fans safe from the coronavirus was to postpone the tournament,” observed Orbih.He stressed that much as all badminton players had looked forward to the tournament, this period calls for caution.“Much as we are saddened by the postponement, we are in total agreement with the BWF that the general well-being of the players, officials and spectators comes first and is of paramount importance.“As we pray for an early end to the coronavirus scourge, we appeal to all and sundry to keep calm, adhere to laid down advisories and generally stay safe,” concludes the BFN Chief.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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More on Onuaku’s injury, No.1 seed in jeopardy?

first_imgmrehalt@syr.eductorr@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+ Monroe explodes — againJohn Thompson III knew Syracuse did not want Greg Monroe to score. That’s why the Orange threw bodies at Monroe every time he touched the ball in the high post, making it hard to get shots. Luckily for the Georgetown head coach, his center is quite the passer. Monroe led Georgetown with seven assists in the Hoyas’ upset of top-seeded Syracuse Thursday afternoon. He also scored 15 points and hauled in a game-high 10 rebounds despite being hounded for most of the game.‘We’re fine because he did a good job of finding his teammates for open shots, open layups, open cuts. So I think that’s what they did,’ Thompson said. ‘Everyone knows Greg is an unselfish player. Had a terrific game without getting a lot of shots. I’m not sure how many points he ended up with. 15 (points), 10 (rebounds), seven (assists). That’s pretty damn good.’Monroe scored just four points in the first half, but he never forced anything as he patiently waited to find open teammates. In the second half, he continued that process, catching the ball in the high post and waiting to discover holes in the Orange zone. He assisted on a Chris Wright field goal that gave the Hoyas a 72-63 lead with 5:43 remaining, and had four assists and 11 points in the second half.The sophomore also hit 5-of-8 free throws down the stretch to help ice the game. Monroe kept Syracuse’s big man combo of Rick Jackson and Arinze Onuaku to just seven points combined.‘They found Monroe in the middle and he did a great job finding the shooters,’ Jackson said of Syracuse’s change in game plan Thursday. ‘It wasn’t about him out there scoring points, he did a great job passing the ball and that’s what it is.’ NEW YORK — Syracuse’s team physician, Irving Raphael, said the X-rays from the injury Arinze Onuaku sustained during the second half of the Orange’s 91-84 loss to Georgetown Thursday came back negative following the game. Raphael does expect Onuaku to play next week in the NCAA Tournament. Raphael said this means there is nothing wrong with Onuaku’s kneecap, knee joint or thigh bone, but cautioned that X-rays do not provide conclusive feedback on muscle or tendon-based injuries or ACL tears. Onuaku will be on crutches and will receive a steady treatment of pain medication and ice, Raphael said. ‘Someone said, ‘Do you expect him to play?’ And I expect him to play unless there’s a surprise,’ Raphael said following Syracuse’s quarterfinal loss. ‘But we’ll get the MRI and we’ll treat what we get.’ Raphael said that by the way Onuaku was describing his pain, it seemed like the same condition he suffered from back in 2006-07 when the center took a redshirt season to rehabilitate his left knee after injuring his quadriceps tendon. Onuaku also had surgery on both of his knees in April 2009 to clear up lingering pain caused by tendonitis. AdvertisementThis is placeholder text‘I don’t know for sure, but his previous condition was not an ACL, and it’s very likely in the same area as that problem from what he’s telling me,’ Raphael said. ‘But again, we’ll know after the MRI tomorrow.’ Still No. 1?Though it’s still to be determined, Syracuse’s hopes for a No. 1 seed in next week’s NCAA Tournament seem to be safe at the moment. Because the Orange is the No. 3 team in the country, it would (theoretically) take two teams to push SU out of one of the spots as a No. 1 seed. The teams directly behind Syracuse, though, haven’t exactly been on a roll.No. 4 Duke lost to Maryland on March 3 and has five losses on the season. The Atlantic Coast conference is down this year, and even winning the conference tournament might not push Duke ahead of the Orange. No. 6 Purdue will have a tough road to win the Big Ten conference tournament, and even if No. 5 Ohio State can win that tournament, it still would have seven losses on the year. West Virginia is the only team in the Big East with a shot — though it is an outside shot — at getting a No. 1 seed. But even winning the Big East tournament probably won’t be enough to get it done. Despite all of this, the media did not give the Orange a break Thursday, inquiring about SU’s seeding numerous times. ‘I think we’ve still been one of the most consistent teams in the country where we can get a No. 1 seed,’ sophomore guard Scoop Jardine said. ‘But it doesn’t matter, but I think we should.’ And with a two-game losing streak and a starting center battling an injury, it’s safe to say the Orange have other things to worry about.  ‘We’re not concerned about that,’ senior guard Andy Rautins said. ‘We just want to get there and play well, regardless of who we play. Either way, you’re going to have to beat teams. Everybody is going to be at their A-game. There aren’t going to be bad teams at that tournament. We’ll be satisfied and prepared wherever we’re at.’ Comments Published on March 10, 2010 at 12:00 pmlast_img read more

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Festival launches Comedy@SCA

first_imgThe university held its inaugural Comedy@SCA festival Friday through Sunday, holding screenings and discussions that featured a variety of directors, producers, writers, show runners and actors.Freaks and Geeks · Paul Feig (left) and Gabe Sachs graduated from the School of Cinematic Arts in 1984. During their discussion on Saturday, they talked about films they had made for their classes. – Photo courtesy of Caleb CappolaThe festival, hosted by the School of Cinematic Arts and Visions and Voices, was held to launch the first ever comedy concentration program, which will teach the technical side of creating comedic movies and television shows. Comedy@SCA will be directed by Jack Epps Jr., the School of Cinematic Arts Jack Oakie endowed chair in comedy and associate professor of writing; Barnet Kellman, professor of film and television production, and David Isaacs, a visiting professor of screenwriting.Epps said USC was the only institution qualified to host the festival.“These people, over a three-day period, coming together, meeting on such a broad range of comedy: I think it’s extremely unique,” Epps said. “And, that was our hope and wish for this [weekend], to create a comedy festival in Los Angeles through USC.”Epps said there had never been a similar festival held in Los Angeles. He introduced the weekend’s first event, a discussion between ’84 alumnus and director Peter Segal and actor Steve Carell.“It’s really never been done in Los Angeles and it’s really overdue,” Epps said. “Tonight is the christening for Comedy@SCA, USC’s effort to become the destination institution for students who are serious about comedy.”Segal summarized the significance of the program’s launch more simply by saying, “It’s about f–king time.”Eric Pratt, a sophomore majoring in writing for screen and television, said the caliber of the cinema school’s connections displayed by the event put him at ease.“It’s great that they have all these big names in one weekend,” Pratt said. “It really shows what kind of connections the School [of Cinematic Arts] has because you see where alumni end up and how they got there. … It’s really encouraging as an aspiring screenwriter.”Organizers said the festival is historically significant because of the initiative it kicks off.Comedy@SCA will provide classes for a concentration that will be open to all students starting spring 2013. Epps said the courses will be at the 400-level, so graduate and undergraduate students in all areas of study can take the classes.“Comedy doesn’t know its limits and is open to everyone, so it’s an initiative of embracing comedy at USC,” Epps said. “The Harvard Lampoon is open to all of Harvard, so this is USC’s place for comedy.”Sarah Zahedi, a freshman majoring in broadcast and digital journalism, said she is excited the classes will be open to those outside the School of Cinematic Arts because she has an interest in the production side of comedy.“It’d be great,” Zahedi said. “I’d love to take those classes and be able to get a lot of good advice from people who really know what they’re talking about.”Paul Feig, creator of Freaks and Geeks and director of Bridesmaids, said the School of Cinematic Arts discouraged comedy when he was a student between 1982 and 1984.“I wish they had [a comedy concentration] when I was here,” Feig said. “All of the movies I made when I was here were comedies and they were met with a lot of derision and skepticism because the film school was a very serious place back in my day.”Feig called the creation of a comedy-focused program “long overdue.”“It’s so smart to do this because comedy is difficult,” Feig said. “Drama and other works are difficult too, but comedy has its own unique challenges and you can’t learn about them from people who don’t do it. You need the perspective of people who have been in the trenches and done it before to tell people how to get it right.”During his discussion with ’84 alumnus and writer/producer Gabe Sachs, Feig said these mistakes were vital in learning how to create comedy.“You only get better at comedy by making a ton of mistakes and it’s great to learn from people who have already made those mistakes,” Feig said. “It’s not like you won’t make those mistakes yourself, but you’ll know [what they are].”Roy Parker, a sophomore majoring in writing for screen and television, said he was comforted by Feig and Sach’s discussion.“For me and a lot of people it’s like wow, they’re talking about 290 and 310, which are classes we take,” Parker said. “It puts me at ease because they’re talking about making crappy little movies just like I make crappy little movies, and now they’re making big movies with Kristin Wiig. It’s encouraging to know we can move on.”Brandon Baer, a sophomore majoring in critical studies, said the Comedy@SCA program directors’ experience will guarantee students of the comedy concentration’s quality.“With their credentials alone, you know the people spearheading this program know what they’re doing,” Baer said. “It’s not every day that your school does this. Other schools that don’t have the same people couldn’t pull this off.”Epps said USC’s location will be vital in its ability to grow the program, just as it was vital in booking speakers for the festival.Epps said the Comedy@SCA initiative resonated with the spirit of the university.“It really represents what’s special at USC,” Epps said. “People want to be part of the many initiatives our university has. It shows the breadth of initiatives we have, whether it’s in the sciences or law or medicine or fine arts. It’s part of what makes USC special.”last_img read more

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Students protest to stop sweatshops labor

first_imgFive student members of the Student Coalition Against Labor Exploitation lay on the ground under white sheets in Hahn Plaza Thursday afternoon to symbolize 1,100 workers who died in factory fires in Bangladesh in the last year. A banner above the bodies read “1,100 killed, President Nikias End Trojan Deathtraps.”Making a statement · Members from Student Coalition Against Labor Exploitation brought attention to the plight of factory workers. – Austin Vogel | Daily TrojanThe group aimed to raise awareness about sweatshop-like labor conditions in unsafe factories in Bangladesh where USC apparel is produced through their “die-in” protest. SCALE hoped to prompt Nikias to amend the code of conduct to ensure that all Trojan apparel brands have signed a legally binding contract that would hold them accountable for unsafe factory violations in Bangladesh.“I don’t want Trojan apparel to be found in the next factory disaster,” said Chanelle Yang, a SCALE member. “Engineers have said that 90 percent of factories in Bangladesh are structurally unsound. The next disaster could happen at any moment.”SCALE members handed out fliers and spoke to students about their cause during the die-in.“I didn’t realize USC apparel was made like this,” said Eva Nofri, a freshman majoring in psychology who witnessed the protest. “It’s kind of horrifying and the protest showed that.”After the protest, SCALE members went to Nikias’ office to deliver a letter with their demands, where Dept. of Public Safety officers arrived to mediate the situation.“We don’t know why DPS was there,” Yang said. “We were there silently and peacefully to deliver a piece of paper to the office. We were not any threat to the administration.”After more than an hour, Vice Provost of Student Affairs Ainsley Carry allowed Julia Wang, the president of SCALE, to speak to the administration. Carry said that the group could schedule a meeting for next semester to discuss the issue with him and bookstore managers.“We are still going to push to get a meeting with Nikias, who is the sole decision-maker,” Wang said.This is just the latest in SCALE’s recent attempts to bring attention to the plight of workers. Earlier in October, the group held a candlelight vigil for workers killed in a factory fire and on Oct. 26, the group rallied for worker’s rights.In 2007, SCALE protesters staged in a similar sit-in at former university President Steven Sample’s office.“We want them to implement the necessary safety measures,” Yang said. “I wanted to make sure that all Trojan members are treated fairly and working under safe conditions and protect millions of workers’ lives in Bangladesh.”last_img read more

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Pulitzer Prize-winning historian discusses citizenship in the United States

first_imgGordon-Reed also spoke about her personal experiences facing discrimination in the United States.   Gordon-Reed ended her speech with a call to action — she encouraged members of the audience to engage in the democratic process. “Looking at legal issues through the lens of history, philosophy and literature adds so much,” Capron said in his introduction. This story has been updated for clarity. Gordon-Reed said she became fascinated with history and law due to her upbringing in Texas.   Gould School of Law vice dean for academic affairs Alex Capron introduced Gordon-Reed at the beginning of the event. Gross agreed with her sentiments. The event, hosted by the Dornsife Center for Law, History and Culture, was moderated by Gould School of Law professor Ariela Gross and drew an audience of approximately 100 students, faculty and guests. Gordon-Reed evaluated the 1857 Supreme Court decision that said African Americans were not citizens. At the time, Roger B. Taney was the Chief Justice and wrote the 7-2 decision. Gordon-Reed said it is important to analyze the Constitution to contextualize the history of citizenship, race and discrimination in the United States. “I think the takeaway was a really shocking one,” Gross said. “Although Justice Taney might be wrong about the history, and maybe he wasn’t right about the law, he was right about the attitudes towards African Americans in the time he wrote.” center_img Gordon-Reed said Justice Taney’s controversial remarks reflected America’s mindset in the 1850s. “He’s telling the truth … it’s not a truth we want to hear,” Gordon-Reed said. “We want to assume people had better thoughts. We like to think he was just a prejudiced man and that these things don’t have resonance, but they do have resonance.” “I looked at the movie theater that was [in my hometown] that my brothers and I used to go to, and I sat in the balcony.” Gordon-Reed said. “It was where black people had to sit. Now, the law had just changed. The law said they couldn’t make us sit there, but the culture had not gotten to the point yet that they would allow that. If we had tried to sit any place else, there would have been a problem.” “I knew that was a slave state, so the institution of slavery naturally interested me,” Gordon-Reed told the Daily Trojan. “There were people and my ancestors who were enslaved in Texas.” “I think it took the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendment to get rid of slavery,” Gordon-Reed said. “And there are provisions in the Constitution that we all know that support slavery, and there are things less obvious that support the institution of slavery.” Gordon-Reed, a professor at Harvard Law School, spoke as a part of the Dornsife Law and Humanities Distinguished Lecturer Series, a yearly program that invites law and history professors from other prestigious universities to speak on humanitarian issues.   Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed spoke about the Supreme Court case Dred Scott v. Sanford and the challenges of United States citizenship at Doheny Library Thursday for a discussion titled, “Was Justice Taney Right? Fighting for Citizenship in the United States.” “Pay attention to government. Pay attention. Participate in government,” she emphasized. “Vote. Volunteer. You’re a part of a democracy, and it doesn’t work if the people don’t make their feelings known and if they don’t participate in it.” History and hindsight | Harvard professor Annette Gordon-Reed encouraged students to learn from the past and participate in democracy. (Val Taranto/Daily Trojan)last_img read more

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Three changes on Tipp team for Munster Minor semi-final.

first_imgManager Liam Cahill has made 3 changes in attack from their quarter final win over Waterford in April.In come Garry Ryan, Tommy Nolan and Lyndon Fairbrother as the Tipperary management set out their stall to redress last year’s defeat to the same opposition.We’ll have regular live updates from Semple Stadium tomorrow night. The team lines out as follows;Padraic Hayes (Ballingarry), Enda Heffernan (Clonoulty Rossmore), Emmet Moloney (Drom & Inch), James Quigley (Kildangan), Jack Skehan (Holycross Ballycahill), Brian McGrath (Loughmore Castleiney), Daragh Peters (Kilruane McDonaghs), Daragh Carey (Templederry Kenyons), Alan Tynan (Roscrea), Liam McCutcheon (Templederry Kenyons), Stephen Quirke Capt. ( Moyle Rovers), Garry Ryan (Borrisokane), Tommy Nolan (Drom & Inch), David Gleeson (Ballinahinch), Lyndon Fairbrother (J.K. Brackens).last_img read more

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Winning Post – Assessing the climate around UK regulation

first_img UKGC hails ‘delivered efficiencies’ of its revamped licence maintenance service  August 20, 2020 Belgian Pro League live betting streaming deal for Stats Perform August 21, 2020 Horseracing Levy reform, or more accurately its process, received a grilling in the joint houses Regulatory Reform committees, with Labour claiming a ‘major government defeat’on the issue. What really seems to be at issue is the fact that the changes have to some extent evaded parliamentary scrutiny in form (via an order rather than primary legislation; although there has been plenty of consultation and debate) and that the (very) new minister, Mims Davies was not sufficiently prepared to give a convincing performance. While there are some interesting governance questions that could be raised in terms of the substance of how the Racing Authority will work (see WPs and blogs passim), these do not appear to have come up. What proved momentarily interesting in the Westminster Bubble is unlikely therefore to have any real impact, in our view. Brazil is a material and growing emerging online market for a number of operators (particularly GVC in terms of sportsbook among listed operators, through its 2009 acquisition of Betboo), though the market has been challenging to many operators because of the specific (or creative) nature of payments methods required to tap into the market. We estimate that the total market is worth c. US$780m in 2017, with above average growth characteristics. Landbased gambling is much more restricted (vide last year’s bun fight over IR casinos and online, albeit prior to a new president with a clearer mandate for change), with LatAm leaders Codere generating only c. €3m revenue (and losing €4m) mainly through horseracing (4 locations) and Cirsa merely hopeful. US: sports rights – IMG enters the betting Arena IMG has won a multi-year deal to distribute data and streaming rights for PGA Golf including the PGA Tour. This deal is a result of the new product IMG Arena, which puts the company in closer competition to companies such as PERFORM, Sportradar and Genius Sports than hitherto. Japan’s top female jockey, Nanako Fujita has ridden 25 winners from 540 rides this year (a winner every 21.6 rides), compared to the top jockey for 2018, Christophe Lemaire, who has ridden 193 winners from 707 rides (a winner every 3.6 rides) which suggests it is not just the quantity, but also quality of racehorse partners which women are potentially missing out on. While this weight allowance may go some way to address the usage of female riders in mainstream domestic racing – allowing riders to pick up more fees, the fact that it cannot be reciprocated within pattern races (the highest standard of race), could prove the allowance to be negative in the long term – as owners will always choose a high-profile jockey for a top race, which sadly precludes the majority of females and therefore prevents any real progress at higher levels. The authors of the report repeatedly emphasise that the findings should be taken with a pinch of salt, stating that “small base sizes mean that these findings should be viewed with caution” and that “the differences in the problem gambling rates in 2018 can largely be attributed to a greater number of respondents qualifying for the screening questions than in previous years.” Share Regulus Partners, the strategic consultancy focused on international gambling and related industries, takes a look at some key developments for the gambling industry in its ‘Winning Post’ column.UK: Regulation – Talking About Their Generation; The Kids Aren’t All RightAnother week, another shoeing for Britain’s beleaguered gambling industry as fresh outrage arrived in the shape of the Gambling Commission’s annual report on youth gambling. The Ipsos MORI survey of 2,000-or-so schoolchildren found that the long-term decline in gambling participation by 11-year-olds to 16-year-olds continued into another year. A significant chunk of youth gambling remains entirely legal and legitimate private betting (e.g. between friends) but within commercial gambling, slots and online have held up as other forms have declined.Unfortunately, the reported rate of problem gambling for this age group increased significantly year-on-year to 1.7%, prompting the gnashing of teeth and tearing of hair down on Fleet Street. Worse was to come as analysis of a new set of questions within the survey revealed that a high proportion of children claimed to have seen gambling adverts in the past week, that TV ads were the most commonly recalled (contradicting an oft-cited claim that the near-surgical attachment of our little darlings to their iPad and phones has stopped them watching TV) and that 7% claimed to have gambled as a result of seeing an ad. First, on the matter of pay. Ms Coates is a co-founder and majority shareholder as well as a co-CEO: not ‘only’ an employee. There are therefore four ways in which she can get money out: pay herself out of payroll (salaries, bonuses etc); pay herself a dividend; sell the company; create a bunch of opaque connected services/operating companies where value extraction is easier (not an option by any means limited to online gambling, but the supply chain does lend itself to this approach). There is absolutely no evidence of the fourth option, with strong evidence of full consolidation into the group (see point two); equally, the fact that the Coates family has not opted for option three is a big reason why there are over 4,000 employees, the majority of whom are in the UK, and that the business keeps going from strength-to-strength: a level of long-term commitment much of UK-plc (and certainly rent-a-director professional meeting participants) notoriously often lack. The Coates family can and does take dividends, taxed in the UK at 38.1% (additional rate); the fact that Ms Coates also chooses the payroll option for a significant amount, where the government gets nearly half of the remuneration award (about the annual running costs of an entire hospital) is an odd thing to criticise… Related Articles The youth survey’s adoption by the Gambling Commission (following the merger of the two regulators) has changed the focus of the report and warranted an expansion in the age banding. Indeed one could argue that (subject to practicalities) the report really should examine gambling by 17-year-olds as well. The change was entirely legitimate (and the Ipsos MORI appears to have adjusted prior year comparisons) but it did affect reporting – particularly on the matter of problem gambling (where the responses from two 16-year-olds may have skewed overall results). UK/global: Transparency in gambling – an ‘obscene’ reaction?We do not normally publicly comment on corporate remuneration or individual companies beyond strategic, operational and financial matters. However, the pay of bet365’s co-founder has become so newsworthy in the UK that it has become a public-press-political talking point, potentially with broader implications. We also believe that most of the commentary has been ill-informed (at best). We therefore feel it appropriate to give our view. UK: In Parliament – Hi Bingo Silver LiningThere is no rest for the wicked, or so they say; but the Parliamentary forces of piety keep pretty busy too – as this week in Westminster proved once more. There was much talk of the human costs of problem gambling – suicide was mentioned by several Members. The erstwhile minister, Tracey Crouch (Cons, Chatham & Aylesford) called attention to the anniversary later in the week of the death of 24-year-old Jack Ritchie, who took his own life, seemingly in connection with his gambling. StumbleUpon Yet if the Gambling Commission has been entirely scrupulous in presenting the facts in a measured and responsible fashion, others (some of whom should know better) have been less so. Those declaiming on the youth gambling “epidemic” may feel that hyperbole is justified in order to bring attention to an important issue – but it doesn’t make them right and it risks their right to be taken seriously within the public policy debate. Tuesday had originally been set as High Noon for the Government’s gambling policy – a Finance Bill amendment debate on the wisdom of deferring implementation of stake reduction on FOBTs. Last week’s climb-down ought to have made the debate redundant – but it is a shame to let a good crisis go to waste, even once it has been averted. Thus it was that former Conservative Party Leader, Iain Duncan Smith (Cons, Chingford & Wood Green) led a cross-party cabal of indignant MPs in lamenting the influence of gambling in Great Britain today. Some in the industry have questioned the Commission’s apparent decision to offer the Daily Mail (not a title with a strong reputation for balanced reporting) an exclusive on the story. As much as there have been signs that the relationship between the regulator and its licensees is improving, this was a reminder that there is still a long way to go. Brazil: online betting regulation – a real opportunity?Brazil has taken a material step closer to legalising sportsbetting (online and retail), with provisional legislation passing the lower house this week. While scant on detail, a revised lottery bill also provides a betting fiscal framework for a 3% turnover tax and a 89% payout minimum for bookmakers. The tax rate therefore works out at 27% GGR or more, depending upon bookmaker generosity. Veteran anti-FOBT warrior, Ronnie Cowan (SNP, Inverclyde) provided a particularly vivid view of the industry’s place in society, saying: “Our TVs are haunted by advertising aimed at the most vulnerable. We even have products aimed at grooming children to be the next generation of gamblers. The gambling industry has to ask itself some very serious questions about its marketing strategy.” Sharecenter_img Clive Lewis (Lab, Norwich South) was one of the participants in the debate. He had the opportunity to reprise his anti-gambling rhetoric on Thursday’s night’s Question Time programme on BBC1. In response to a question from the audience on the remuneration of bet365 co-founder and CEO, Denise Coates, Lewis told viewers that “the modern gambling industry preys on people’s vulnerabilities”. A day later, Tombola fell foul of the Guardian in relation to its sponsorship of the popular (search me) TV show ‘I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here’ (and in particular the associated voting app). This was a bad week for those manning the defence of the industry’s advertising privileges – but was all the scorn justified? It is of course not a fact – unless of course one’s conception of a “fact” is a baseless assertion made with such regularity and conviction that none dare oppose it. These are dark days indeed.Incidentally, the Culture Select Committee will next week debate “disinformation and fake news”. We doubt the latest ‘alternative facts’ about the volume of gambling-related suicides (which does a disservice to a very serious issue, in our view) will get a mention, despite now being apparently accepted by a number of MPs. Elsewhere, the Conservative Party peer and voice of gambling concern in the upper chamber, Lord Chadlington popped a brace of PQs in the post, asking the DCMS what effect an advertising ban would have on rates of problem gambling (the best answer that we can guess at from the available research is “relatively modest”); and quizzing the Department of Health about the cost to the NHS from problem gambling over the last five years. Meanwhile, Jared O’Mara, the Independent Member for Sheffield Hallam became the 37thMP to sign Early Day Motion 1351 which “urges the Government to introduce measures to end all televised gambling advertising before 9pm”.We suspect many others will follow.   Submit Here was the gambling industry at its best, celebrating a contribution of £1.3m to the children’s charity. MPs seemed delighted to be there (and to be playing without shame in a charity bingo game), meeting bingo club customers and employees in the secure knowledge that no-one was likely to bend their ears on gambling policy. Significantly, one of the politicians in attendance was the Honourable Member for Eastleigh in Hampshire (home to Leo’s Bingo), the new sports (and gambling) minister, Mims Davies. Here perhaps was a glimpse of a better future for the gambling industry if it can eschew spin and find positive ways to connect with society once more. Operators may feel a bit hard done by after another week of indiscriminate reporting and facile commentary; but this is no time for self-pity. It serves the industry no good to nickel and dime over how many children really are problem gamblers (and what that even means) as there is no good number north of zero. The latest youth survey poses a number of challenges for licensees – particularly remote operators – and these require positive responses. A wide range of regulatory issues was exposed to scrutiny during the course of the debate – TV advertising and industry marketing; gambling on credit; betting shop clustering; the inadequacy of funding for research, education and treatment (and thus the need for a levy); dormant account fees; and pernicious industry lobbying. Few MPs could resist sticking the boot into the mortally stricken corpse of the FOBT – although Members from Northern Ireland will have considered that they had good reason given the likelihood that their constituencies would be among the last redoubts of the £100 a spin high street machine (an anomaly that poses a test of the betting industry’s newly minted conscientiousness). Finally, the issue of ethics is both thorny and subjective. People have an absolute right to decry gambling in general, and the consensus view is certainly that advertising has got out of hand – an issue bet365 has certainly had a material role in. However, linking not liking gambling to the success of a business; or linking questions over general business practices to the behaviours of one company (without any evidence of specific wrong-doing) seems gratuitous to us (indeed, bet365 invests more in responsible gambling – including sharing learnings – as well as social – good than the vast majority of commercial gambling companies – including over £250m in charitable donations since inception). Some people might not like gambling; some people might think it is too visible; some people might simply have an aversion to Ray Winstone…(although bonuses are not advertised and a responsible gambling sign-off has been added for over four years). However, bet365 is one of the UK’s strongest intangible export stories, it is a significant employer, and is run without much consideration to hiding revenue or avoiding/evading tax – that is something to celebrate, in our view. It is of course rare that this column brings much in the way of good news (the result of a severely challenging environment for gambling along combined with our curmudgeonly demeanour). There was however, a silver lining this week at the Parliamentary reception for the Variety Club of Great Britain, organised by The Bingo Association. Second, bet365 is a global company. It has no requirement to inform joe public where it makes its money, but it does have to tell the GB Gambling Commission, and legally justify it, for all country revenue above 3%. It would be very easy for bet365 to become less transparent by moving its topco to a less public and much lower (no) tax jurisdiction – just like practically every other digital business. The fact that bet365 has not taken this approach means not only that a lot of employment is created in the UK, but also HMRC is richer to the tune of c. £300-400m (possibly more) across all UK-related taxes (vs. c. £100m in remote gambling taxes alone: the equivalent for most GB licensees). bet365 is therefore subject to levels of transparency and scrutiny significantly higher than most digital businesses – and while people will always demand more, they should probably consider the cost of getting less if bet365 were to become more ‘normal’… There seems to be three key charges levelled at bet365 and Ms Coates: the pay amount is ‘obscene’; the company isn’t very transparent about where it generates its money, and; the business (is in an industry which) exploits people (topically minors) / isn’t very ethical. We will address each in turn, but we would also add that the fact that one of Britain’s most successful companies was co-founded and is being led by a woman of limited privilege (other than rather handily inheriting some betting shops) should not be overlooked. The proposed fiscal framework looks attractive on averages, but has two key weaknesses, in our view. First, while 27% GGR equivalent tax looks acceptable on averages, the payout restriction undermines both in-play value and multiple flexibility: many books may average close (enough) to an 89% payout, but this is an outcome: very few actual products do, and this gives a huge potential advantage to the black market (the structure is likely to be kinder to retail, therefore potentially a benefit to Cirsa and Codere). Second, there is no mention of gaming, which constitutes over half the market (RP estimate) and is an important / growing jurisdiction not only for GVC but also for TSG (poker only), JPJ and others. If the law is strong enough to clarify a ban on gaming (question whether poker is gaming or not under Brazilian law), then the level of dislocation caused is likely to be far worse in the short/medium-term than the POC opportunity opened up (especially given the fiscal constraints). Exposed operators may therefore have some awkward compliance choices to make…. Interestingly, most of the Question Time panellists defended Ms Coates. Trevor Philips even seemed to indicate that because much of the firm’s revenue originated in Asia, it should not be blamed too much for problem gambling in Britain – a rather bizarre comment from the former chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission. Japan: horseracing – su’she’ allowanceThe Japanese Racing Authority has followed France Galop’s lead, by introducing a 2kg weight allowance for female jockeys in an attempt to enhance their opportunities and success. In France, the result was a doubling of opportunities and a 165% increase in the number of winners recorded. Following review the weight allowance has since been decreased to 1.5kg for flat races. IMG has historically concentrated on high impact official rights with a largely media focus, where other providers have broadened more into churn product, especially where betting was also the focus. The growing portfolio of IMG may therefore make it a more significant data as well as AV supplier for the top end of betting operators, particularly if further large tournament/league contracts are won. Where historically it has lacked some of the key services required by clients and offered by competitors, particularly in terms of in-play betting offering, this deal combined with its strategic partnership with virtuals provider Leap Gaming strengthen its position as a betting partner. The overall result is therefore likely to add to both the complexity and cost of sports rights for betting, likely widening the divide between top tier and ‘other’ operators even further…. The hoopla was in part caused by what might have appeared a relatively minor change in the survey – the inclusion of 16-year-olds. The original youth gambling surveys were the purview of the Lottery Commission and were thus primarily interested in the gambling behaviours of those below the legal age for lottery play. It also meant that the surveys dove-tailed neatly with intermittent household surveys (the British Gambling Prevalence Survey series and the Health Survey series) which only include those aged 16 years and older. Jim Shannon (DUP, Strangford) attempted to paint a broader canvas on this point, saying: “The one thing that sits in my mind is this: why was it important to have those six months slip back from October to April? It is very simple: as has been said, 300 lives—maybe more—were saved. That is a fact.” Brazil appoints agencies to accelerate Sports Betting launch August 21, 2020 While the risk of change is real, in our view, it should not be overplayed. Brazil’s need for money is matched by significant bastions of cultural aversion to commercial gambling. The senate has only until the middle of next week to approve, after which a further series of fights over implementation can be expected even if the law is passed. Unfortunately (and mirroring a number of material markets), muddle and acrimony is probably safer than policy for much of the .com sector…Global: M&A – Summary– GVC Holdings has acquired Neds International in a deal with a potential value of £52m.– Evolution Gaming is to acquire Ezugi at initial indications for US$12m.– I-AM Capital has completed its acquisition of SMAASH Entertainment Private Limited. The company as a result has changed it name to SMAASH Entertainment inc.– Zeal Network SE has made a bid to acquire Lotto24 AG, Zeal are hopeful the deal could complete in H119.last_img read more

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Rabiu Mohammed undergoes surgery, out for six months

first_imgGhana midfielder Rabui Mohammed would be out for six months after undergoing surgery on his knee.After going under the knife in Germany this week, the Kuban Krasnodar midfielder has had an earlier diagnonis confirmed. Tests at the time had that the 26-year-old had a gap between the interior cruciate ligaments in his right knee and damaged the internal meniscus.This cruciate knee ligament injury will mean he is out of the last two games of Ghana’s 2017 Nations Cup qualifiers against Mauritius and Rwanda.Six months out also means he may struggle to hit form in time for Ghana’s likely charge to an Afcon title in Gabon next January. Rabiu had picked up the injury in Krasnodar’s league game against Rostov.Rabiu has been start-stop since making a move to Russia in 2013 from Evian in France in a move worth about ‎€3 million. He suffered the injury in mid-April when his side played Rostov. —last_img read more

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MVPs, 30-point games, season averages — Where LeBron James trails Michael Jordan after points milestone

first_img LeBron James passes Michael Jordan: Who is the GOAT? LeBron James boosted his claims to be the greatest player in NBA history as he edged past Michael Jordan’s points total on Wednesday.The Lakers star contributed 31 points during a 115-99 loss against the Nuggets to nudge ahead of the Bulls great (32,292), moving up to 32,311. And so debate will rage again about who might be the greatest of all time, with James and Jordan certainly at the forefront of any discussion.But by many measures, James still falls short of Jordan. We take a look at some statistics where the retired star still has the advantage. Related News WATCH: Lakers play tribute video for LeBron James after he passes Michael Jordan on all-time scoring listcenter_img Historic night for basketball royalty. @KingJames passes His Airness as the fourth-leading scorer of all-time. pic.twitter.com/f1WsVjOBvH— Los Angeles Lakers (@Lakers) March 7, 2019SHOOTINGJames might now have the edge in terms of points, but that does not mean he has yet matched Jordan’s tallies in terms of field goals or free throws made.Jordan made 12,192 field goals (fourth best) and 7,327 free throws (fifth best) to James’ 11,748 (sixth) and 7,101 (eighth).POINTSAnd Jordan certainly enjoyed more one-off outstanding games, topping the charts in NBA history in terms of 30-point performances with 562. James has 442 so far to lie third.The 56-year-old also had an incredible knack of converting those displays into much higher points tallies, scoring 40-plus points on an incredible 173 occasions, as well as 50-plus points 31 times. James is a way off on both.AVERAGESAll these numbers combined to see Jordan average 30-plus points per game in eight seasons, as well as 30.1 points per game through his career. Both numbers are NBA highs.STEALSJordan was not just about points, though. He made 2,514 steals in his career and averaged 2.3 per game. This is an area in which James lags behind comparatively, ranking 17th and 60th in NBA history. AWARDSOf course, as two of the greatest to have ever played the sport, individual honors are a guarantee. Jordan won five MVP awards, tying for second all-time. James is tied for fourth with his four.In NBA Finals, nobody has been able to match Jordan and his six MVP awards. Incredibly, James is in a tie for second yet three behind on three.last_img read more

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