Field Talk: A Q&A with Providers Supporting Military Families

first_imgDiPietro-Wells, R. (2015). Field Talk: A Q&AField Talk is a monthly blog post sharing the voices of early childhood providers who serve or have served military families of young children with disabilities (birth to 5 years old).  We hope you find it to be educational, personable, and encouraging.This month we talked with Dora, MS, CCC-SLP.  Dora is a speech pathologist and currently serve children with a variety of needs including autism, cochlear implants, apraxia, phonological disorders, and language disorders.  She currently is employed by a Children’s Hospital, which is part of a large University Health Care system. In this position she serves children in an outpatient therapy center which provides physical, occupational, and speech therapy to children from birth through age 18.  This interview has been edited for length and clarity.What’s your favorite part of your current job?I enjoy being part of a team of therapists who focus on the whole child. There is nothing better than working in a collaborative setting where you can brainstorm ideas with other therapists and coordinate services with other care providers.Tell us about experiences you have had working with military families.I served military families while employed by a private practice; the majority of children were in an early intervention program or at developmental day centers. In my current setting the military families I serve are National Guard or Reserve families.How did you come to work with military families?I became an active duty military spouse and moved to an area with a large military installation. I later had my own children, one of whom has special needs, and have experienced being a military family receiving special education services.Describe a rewarding experience working with military families.A rewarding experience I had serving a military family was when I was working with a 2 year who had complex medical needs. This child had a tracheostomy and we were doing Passy Muir speaking valve trials. I was there when this child’s mom heard his voice for the first time and later when his mom heard “mama” for the first time. This was an unforgettable experience and I was blessed to be a part of a special moment for this military family.From your experience, how are military families similar and different from other types of families? How do you change your practice between families?Military families are similar to other families in that they have the typical day-to-day challenges non-military families face. They also have the same emotions with regard to receiving a diagnosis for their child or giving birth to a child with a disability. Military families are “real” families with “real” day-to-day challenges that other families face. The difference is the additional things military families have on their plate. They might deal with an active duty parent leaving for training, preparing for a deployment, and returning from a deployment. There are constant adjustments that are being made in a military family’s life. Also, many military families live away from their extended family, and other military families become their support system. These families have a bond and support each other unlike the non-military families I have served.Another difference when serving Reserve or National Guard families is that these families often make major adjustments when one parent is activated and away from the family. These families have to switch from a civilian life to being an active duty family when the service member is activated. Sometimes these families may not live in an area where there is a military installation and the community and providers may not be aware of the best ways to support the family.I changed my practice to accommodate and understand schedule changes and made efforts to include the active duty parent(s) in order to make them an active part of the care team. Often the active duty (or activated) parent may feel left out of the therapy plan because they may be away or just returning from training/deployment.As providers, how can we support military parents who are deployed or away frequently due to trainings/school?As providers one way we can support military parents is to include them using email, Skype, and Facetime, if these are options. Many years ago this was not an option for families, but now depending on the circumstances of the training/deployment, the parent may have access to the Internet. This is a great way to include the parent who is away. Another way is to meet with the parent before he/she leaves and go over the treatment plan and ways this parent can support the parent who is home with the child(ren). Additionally, once the parent returns and has had time with the family, meeting to discuss progress and the current home program for the family is also helpful. If providers assume the parent at home will explain everything to the spouse who is away, this can put additional stress on the spouse at home. I have found that trying to work with the family as a whole yields better progress, as well as unity within the family.Describe a specific stressor that military families with whom you have worked have shared or experienced.One stressor I have seen in military families is when one parent is deployed or away at training, the parent at home with a child who has a disability may need respite. Having a child with a disability can be challenging, but when one parent is away then all parenting and household responsibilities fall on the parent holding down the home front. While there may be respite services available to some families, other families may not seek these out or qualify for them.What “insider” tips or advice do you have for service providers working with military families who have young children with disabilities?First and foremost if you are not familiar with military language and acronyms – learn them! You need to know what these things mean when the family talks about what is happening in their life. Another suggestion is to learn the specific needs of the area in which you serve families. For example, the needs of Reserve and National Guard families are different than active duty families. When serving active duty families consider the kinds of units in the area. Learn about them so you will know what those families’ schedules and challenges are like. Consider: Is it a unit that deploys frequently for short durations or time? Is it a unit that does less frequent deployments but for longer periods or time? Is it a training installation where service members may be away for training or teaching frequently? In my experience, when working with families, each military area has unique needs to that specific area. In order to better serve families, learn about the area and its unique needs.If you could change or improve one thing for military families with young children with disabilities, what would it be?I would like it to be easier for families to transition services when moving from one place to another, to alleviate some stress on the families. These families are extremely resourceful, but that does not mean providers shouldn’t help ease the process a bit.What types of resources have you sought out to feel more confident and competent at meeting the specific needs of military families? (e.g., trainings, blog posts, organizations, etc.)I learned about being a military wife while I was serving military families. I was fortunate to have other wives and providers mentor me through that process. Resources like the Military Family Learning Network are so valuable as they provide information that is easily accessible for providers and families.This post was written by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

Read More →

No Threat to Expat Indians: Maldives

first_imgAfter veteran Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader Subramanian Swamy asked Indian government to invade Maldives in order to “protect Indians” there, Maldives Ambassador to India Ahmad Mohammad on Thursday said Swamy was “imagining things.”Read it at Gulf News Related Itemslast_img

Read More →

Promoter Of DLF Sells Shares

first_imgK. P. Singh, promoter of India’s largest real estate company DLF, has sold $800 million of his shares, partly to cover losses incurred by another of his companies as a result of the crash in India’s property prices. The shares were sold for under $5 per share, less than half the $11/ share IPO price in 2006.  Related Itemslast_img

Read More →

Hockey: India pull out of Johor Cup to avoid playing Pakistan

first_imgIndia have pulled out of the Sultan of Johor Cup to avoid playing Pakistan in the Sultan of Johor Cup. Hockey India, has for long, demanded an apology for Pakistan’s horrible behaviour during the Champions Trophy in 2014.Pakistani players took off their shirts and made obscene gestures at the crowd at the full-house stadium after winning the semi-final of the Champions Trophy against India.Following the ugly incident, the International Hockey Federation (FIH) had banned two Pakistani players. Amjad Hussain and Tauseeq Ahmed were banned for one match each for misconduct, while Shafqat Rasool was let off with a warning.”By not fielding the Indian team at the Sultan of Johor Cup, we have stood our ground to not take part in any series against Pakistan until they submit an unconditional apology for what happened in 2014. Since the Sultan of Johor Cup is not a mandatory tournament, Hockey India has decided that it will withdraw from the tournament.”We had not brought up the bad behaviour on part of Pakistan during the FIH Champions Trophy in 2014 for a very long time. It is actually PHF who bring it up again and levy baseless allegations against Hockey India to hide their own incompetency. It is about time PHF takes responsibility for it’s incapability,” RP Singh, Hockey India spokesperson said in a statement.last_img read more

Read More →

World Cup maths leaves Socceroos with a simple job against Thailand: win big

first_imgShare on WhatsApp Socceroos’ World Cup hopes hang in balance after Japan qualify with win Topics The Joy of Six: Crucial Socceroo World Cup qualifiers Read more Ordinarily you would think a World Cup qualifying campaign that has featured just two defeats in 17 matches would be considered a success. But when such a campaign has yet to achieve its ultimate aim, you can understand why the Socceroos’ bandwagon remains parked in the side street. Anti-climactically, tonight’s final group B qualifier, against Thailand at Melbourne’s Aami Park, is not likely to set that bandwagon rolling. Given that second-placed Saudi Arabia, who have a +2 better goal difference than the Socceroos, play group-winners Japan in the early hours of Wednesday morning in Jeddah, Australia will need to win, and win by a significant margin, to ensure there is more dancing than restless shuffling in the aisles in the moments after the full-time whistle. Share on LinkedIn World Cup 2018 qualifiers Ange Postecoglou Share on Twitter Socceroos’ defeat to Japan highlights Ange Postecoglou’s selection challenges Read more “A man’s reach should exceed his grasp,” poet Robert Browning once penned, and that’s a philosophy with which Postecoglou seems to abide. You would think that would be a good thing but as much as Postecoglou has attracted admiration for his intent to instil in his teams an attacking, possession-based philosophy, questions have been asked as to whether his players have the technical ability to execute it under pressure.Certainly there have been worrying signs in the long road to Russia.Though the Socceroos have lost just two games in qualification – against Jordan in Amman in October 2015, and last week against Japan in Saitama – it’s the four draws in the second round of qualifying that have left them on this knife edge and exposed the team’s weaknesses. Three have proven particularly costly. In Jeddah, in October 2016, the Socceroos conceded a 79th-minute equaliser against Saudi Arabia. A month later it took two Mile Jedinak penalties to secure a point against Thailand in Bangkok. Then, in March, Australia got wobbly-legged down the stretch and allowed Iraq a 76th-minute equaliser in Tehran.The Socceroos were not at their best in losing 2-0 to Japan last week. They looked slow and nervy and they allowed Japan a gift of an opener – for which left-back Brad Smith was culpable. He may find himself on the bench tonight. On top of that they lacked sharpness in attack – a situation exacerbated by an out-of-sorts game from Tom Rogic as well as the late withdrawal of Aaron Mooy and an illness to Tomi Juric, which left Robbie Kruse leading the line. When the Socceroos did attack, they did so without throwing too many numbers forward. As the game wears on in Melbourne such caution will have to go out the window.The Socceroos won’t be thinking of the past when they line up against Thailand. There will plenty of time for regrets, if need be, later on. Instead they will have one thought: win, and win well. It could open them up to Thai counter-attacks but the simple objective could prove liberating.However, it won’t get the band on the wagon just yet. Until Wednesday morning at the earliest, the trombonists and trumpeters ready to celebrate Australia’s World Cup qualification will have to stand by and practise their “buzzing”. Let’s hope that doesn’t unnerve the Socceroos. To the untrained ear, buzzing quite closely resembles the blowing of raspberries. features Share on Facebook Share on Messenger Read more Share via Email Share on Pinterest A Saudi Arabia win could out-trump an Australian one. If it did, it would toss the Socceroos back into the maelstrom of sudden-death play-offs – a stomach-flipping, nightmarish place (exhibit A: Australia v Iran, MCG, 1997) Australian football hoped it would never have to revisit after leaving Oceania for the direct-qualification route offered by Asia. On this occasion likely play-off opponents for Australia or Saudi Arabia include Syria or Uzbekistan and, if they were overcome, the US, Panama or Honduras. Banana skins, the lot of them.For the past two World Cups, of course, Australia have qualified directly through Asia and perhaps there was some complacency – though not from the players, captain Mark Milligan said this week – that they would do so again this time, especially after Ange Postecoglou’s reign as coach started with the Socceroos’ promising (if ultimately pointless) performance in the 2014 World Cup, before it burst into bloom at the 2015 Asian Cup.But as the Socceroos’ Russia campaign has shown – besides the fact that we don’t allow national football coaches any time for laurel-resting (which could partly explain Postecoglou’s default demeanour, which is that of a man permanently backed into a corner) – the Asian confederation is no cakewalk. And that’s especially true for a team which, despite such past efforts and the aspirations of their coach, is made up fringe players on the world scene. And some are barely that – a sign of the skinniness of Australian football’s playing stocks at the moment. Australia Reuse this contentlast_img read more

Read More →

2nd Test: South Africa thrash Pakistan by 9 wickets to clinch series

first_img2nd Test: South Africa thrash Pakistan by 9 wickets to clinch seriesSouth Africa vs Pakistan 2nd Test Day 4, Brief scores: Pakistan 177 & 294 all out (Asad Shafiq 88, Babar Azam 72, Shan Masood 61, Kagiso Rabada 4 for 61, Dale Steyn 4 for 85), South Africa 431 & 43/1 (Dean Elgar 24 not out). South Africa beat Pakistan by 9 wickets. South Africa skipper Faf du Plessis was named man of the match for first innings century.advertisement Reuters Cape TownJanuary 6, 2019UPDATED: January 6, 2019 16:22 IST South Africa players celebrates (Reuters Photo)HIGHLIGHTS2nd Test Day 4 brief scores: South Africa (431 and 43/1) beat Pakistan (177 & 294 all out) by 9 wickets. Dean Elgar 24 not outSouth Africa have taken an unbeatable 2-0 lead in the 3-match seriesFaf du Plessis was named man of the match for first innings centurySouth Africa vs Pakistan 2nd Test Day 4 Scores(Full Scorecard)Brief Scores:Pakistan 177 & 294 all out (Asad Shafiq 88, Babar Azam 72, Shan Masood 61, Kagiso Rabada 4 for 61, Dale Steyn 4 for 85)South Africa 431 (Faf du Plessis 103) & 43 for 1 (Dean Elgar 24 not out, Mohammad Abbas 1 for 14)South Africa win by 9 wicketsSouth Africa reeled off their modest victory target of 41 runs early on the fourth day of the second Test against Pakistan to clinch the series with a comprehensive nine-wicket triumph at Newlands on Sunday.Opener Dean Elgar scored an unbeaten 24 as the home side added to their victory in Pretoria last month and will be looking to sweep the series in the third match at the Wanderers in Johannesburg, starting on Friday.The Proteas will have concerns over their top-order batting, however, with opener Aiden Markram not taking to the crease in the second innings with a severely bruised right thigh and Hashim Amla retiring hurt after he was struck on the bicep.Added to that, middle-order batsman Theunis de Bruyn, deputising for Markram at the top of the order, continued his poor run when he was the only wicket to fall, caught by wicketkeeper Sarfraz Ahmed off seamer Mohammed Abbas for four.”We played very well,” South Africa captain Faf du Plessis, who was also named man of the match for a first-innings century, said at the post-match presentation.”There is always something in the wicket here at Newlands and you need to be on form with the bat. We know if we get runs on the board, our bowlers will do the rest.”advertisementDu Plessis felt the key to victory was restricting Pakistan to 177 in their first innings in what was the most difficult time to bat in the Test on day one.”I think day one was moving day in terms of the pitch, but it got easier to bat on and yesterday Pakistan were in a good position to bat on and get a 150 lead and then who knows what happens.”I still feel there was enough in it for batters and bowlers. At times it was difficult but that’s Test cricket.”POOR START CRITICALPakistan will take positives from a Test in which they avoided an innings defeat with a stout batting performance on Saturday to force the contest into a fourth day.Shan Masood, Asad Shafiq and Babar Azam all scored half-centuries as Pakistan produced their best day of batting on tour and scored more than 200 runs in an innings for the first time in the series.They were eventually dismissed for 294, setting their hosts a modest target, which South Africa had hoped to knock off on Saturday but ran out of time and were forced to come back on Sunday.Pakistan scored 177 in their first innings and were critical of the uneven bounce and cracks on the wicket at the iconic Cape Town venue but South Africa, with Du Plessis scoring 103, replied with 431.Touring captain Sarfraz admitted a bad start, in which they lost five wickets in the first session, proved their undoing.”It’s hard to recover if you’re losing five wickets in the first session, but the way our batsmen are batting, that’s how you learn in Test cricket,” he said, adding the team would have benefited from more warm-up matches ahead of the first Test.”For me, playing two or three practice matches [is best] but we only played one match here. Our batsmen showed their courage, hopefully we’ll have confidence [into the third Test].”Also Watch:For sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byJepher Nickels Tags :Follow Dean ElgarFollow Faf Du Plessislast_img read more

Read More →

GST collections rise marginally to 102 lakh crore in July

first_imgNew Delhi: Gross GST collections stood at Rs 1.02 lakh crore in July, marginally up from the previous month, official data showed on Thursday. The July 2019 mop-up was, however, 5.8 per cent higher than the Rs 96,483 crore collected in the same month last year. Revenue collection from the Goods and Services Tax (GST) had slipped below the Rs 1 lakh crore mark for the first time in the current fiscal in June at Rs 99,939 crore.last_img

Read More →

Body of girl 13 found by police in Attawapiskat

first_img(Sheridan Hookimaw, 13, was found dead in Attawapiskat. Instagram)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsA 13 year-old girl was recently found dead in the northern Ontario First Nation of Attawapiskat and the family is now waiting for the provincial coroner to determine the cause of death.Sheridan Hookimaw’s body was found by a Nishnawbe-Aski Police (NAPs) officer while on patrol near an area locally known as “the first rapids” on about Oct. 19, according to a family member.NAPs spokesperson Sgt. Jackie George said the police service was waiting for a report from the coroner.“We provided the information to the coroner and the coroner hasn’t released a report yet,” said George.Attawapiskat is one of the country’s poorest communities. The First Nation is situated near the place where the Attawapiskat River flows into James Bay.The community has made national headlines over the dire state of its housing. Its former chief Theresa Spence captured Canada’s attention when she began a liquids-only fast during the height of the Idle No More movement between the fall of 2012 and the winter of 2013.Hookimaw’s home was one of several in the community contaminated after Attawapiskat’s sewage system backed up. The home, which was abandoned, was then burned down by youth, according to a family member.The young girl was living in over-crowded conditions at a nursing home in the community. She also faced bullying at school and some of it may have been committed by an instructor, according to a family member.The coroner’s report is expected sometime this month.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

Read More →

Shell urges CAPP to adjust emission policies to support carbon pricing

first_imgIn the report, Shell says CAPP is out of line because it doesn’t comment on the Paris accord, nor does it publicly support federal and provincial carbon pricing frameworks in Canada.It adds that it is aligned with CAPP, however, on support of Canada’s climate targets and policies that encourages technology and innovation to address climate change, as well as on the use of natural gas as an energy source and properly managing methane.Shell was a much bigger player in the Canadian oilpatch before it sold most of its oilsands assets to Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. in 2017.“Taking into account the broader value of our membership, we remain a committed member of CAPP. We will continue to engage with the association and closely monitor our alignment on climate-related topics,” the Shell report concludes. CALGARY, A.B. – Global energy giant Royal Dutch Shell is urging Canada’s largest oil and gas organization to get off the fence and support both the Paris climate accord and the pricing of carbon to encourage greenhouse gas emission reductions.In a new report, Shell says it has reviewed its relationships with 19 industry associations around the world and decided to leave one of them, the American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers, because of “material misalignment.”It found some misalignment with nine others, including the Calgary-based Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.last_img read more

Read More →

Saskatchewan MLA Jennifer Campeau stepping down to take job with mining company

REGINA — A Saskatchewan member of the legislature and former cabinet minister has announced she is leaving politics effective Sunday.Saskatoon Fairview MLA Jennifer Campeau says she has accepted a position with mining company Rio Tinto in British Columbia.Campeau says it’s been an honour to represent the constituency, but the time has come to move on to a different opportunity.Campeau was elected twice in very close races: she won by 247 votes in 2011 and was re-elected in 2016 by 182 votes.She served as central services minister from 2014 to 2016, and has most recently been legislative secretary in the Education Ministry for First Nations student achievement.Premier Brad Wall says Campeau winning a difficult seat twice for the Saskatchewan Party speaks to the job she has done and to the respect her constituents have for her.A byelection must be held within six months to fill the vacant seat. read more

Read More →