Faculty Council meeting — Jan. 25, 2018

first_imgOn Jan. 24 the members of the Faculty Council approved legislation on the Ph.D. program in bioinformatics and integrative genomics.  They also discussed the search for the next dean of undergraduate education and a proposed concentration in environmental science and engineering. Finally, they considered a proposed amendment to the motion on Advanced Standing that was presented for discussion at the December meeting of the Faculty.The Council next meets on Feb. 14. The next meeting of the Faculty is on Feb. 6. The preliminary deadline for the Mar. 6 meeting of the Faculty is Feb. 20 at noon.last_img read more

Read More →

Romaine Recall

first_imgIn the midst of the third outbreak of E. coli linked to romaine lettuce in less than two years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) urges consumers to avoid buying or eating any romaine lettuce. In this recent outbreak, the CDC is reporting that 32 people in 11 states have been infected with E. coli O157:H7, a serotype of the bacteria that causes foodborne illness. So far, 13 people have been hospitalized, including one person who developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure. No deaths have been reported to date.Consumers are urged to avoid all types of romaine lettuce: whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, chopped romaine, and salad and salad mixes containing romaine.University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Food Processing and Safety Specialist Anand Mohan has a slogan for this situation: “When in doubt, throw it out.”“If you are served romaine lettuce in a restaurant, please do not eat it. If you have any type of romaine lettuce in your home, throw it away, even if you have eaten some of it,” he said.If you have purchased a salad mix and are unsure if it contains romaine lettuce, do not eat it and throw it away, Mohan said.As an additional safety measure, Mohan says that consumers should sanitize all drawers or shelves in refrigerators where romaine lettuce was stored. Last spring’s outbreak linked to romaine lettuce from Yuma, Arizona, was traced back to the presence of a large cattle feedlot in the area, said Professor Francisco Diez, director of the UGA Center for Food Safety. “This latest event is, unfortunately, corroborating our realization that the implementation of preventive measures is urgently needed. The impact to the produce industry will be regrettably enormous,” Diez said. “The strain causing this latest outbreak appears to be almost identical to the one responsible for the 2017 outbreak that implicated leafy greens in the U.S. and romaine lettuce in Canada, but it is different from the one earlier this year.”Moving forward, UGA Extension Food Safety Specialist Judy Harrison says that cleaning the surface of leafy greens, like lettuce, can be difficult because of the natural openings in the leaves of the plant, which it uses for respiration. Bacteria can get inside the plant through these openings or through damaged areas and be protected there. If this happens, pathogens may not be removed by washing the lettuce. To reduce the risk of eating contaminated produce, heads of lettuce and other greens should be cleaned as before eating. Harrison recommends discarding the outermost leaves before washing the remainder with running water, two to three leaves at a time. A single-use paper towel should be used to dry the leaves, which may help to remove more pathogens, if present.When purchasing precut or bagged produce that is labeled “prewashed” or “ready-to-eat,” washing the produce again at home is not necessary and may instead create opportunities for it to become contaminated, she said.last_img read more

Read More →

Vermont organizations receive $400,000 to assist home owners

first_imgSix Vermont organizations received a total of nearly $400,000 as US Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack selected recipients in 50 states and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for grants to make critical repairs and improve housing conditions for low- and very-low-income rural residents. The support Vilsack announced is provided through USDA Rural Development’s Housing Preservation Grants (HPG) program. Funds are provided to intermediaries such as town or county governments, public agencies, federally recognized Indian Tribes, and non-profit and faith-based and community organizations. These organizations then distribute the grants to homeowners and owners of multi-family rental properties or cooperative dwellings who rent to low- and very-low-income residents. Grants may be used to make general repairs, such as installing or improving plumbing or providing or enhancing access to people with disabilities. Funds may also be used to weatherize and make homes more energy efficient. The following is a complete list of recipients. The funding, a total of $399,918, is contingent upon the recipient meeting the terms of the grant agreement. Central Vermont Community Land Trust ‘ $50,000Champlain Housing Loan Fund ‘ $50,000Gilman Housing Trust, Inc. ‘ $83,306Northeast Employment and Training ‘ $83,306Southeastern Vermont Community Action ‘ $50,000Vermont Center for Independent Living ‘ $83,306 ‘Our investment under this program will leverage $733,000 of other sources of funds to help low and very low homeowners and renters’, said Molly Lambert, State Director USDA Rural Development.  ‘We are proud of our partnerships with the organizations that serve these citizens of our state’, Lambert said. The funds will be used for weatherization, access modification for disabled residents, and essential home repairs.’ Since taking office, President Obama’s Administration has taken historic steps to improve the lives of rural Americans, put people back to work and build thriving economies in rural communities. From proposing the American Jobs Act to establishing the first-ever White House Rural Council ‘ chaired by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack ‘ the President wants the federal government to be the best possible partner for rural businesses and entrepreneurs creating job opportunities and for people who want to live, work, and raise their families in rural communities. USDA, through its Rural Development mission area, administers and manages housing, business and community infrastructure and facility programs through a national network of state and local offices. Rural Development has an existing portfolio of more than $155 billion in loans and loan guarantees. These programs are designed to improve the economic stability of rural communities, businesses, residents, farmers and ranchers and improve the quality of life in rural America.  Visit http://www.rurdev.usda.gov(link is external) for additional information about the agency’s programs.MONTPELIER VT-November 8, 2011 ‘last_img read more

Read More →

Fridays on the Fly: Wes Hodges’ Proper Etiquette For Fishing With Guides

first_imgIntro by Justin Forrest, words by Wes HodgesFishing with a guide in new waters is one of the best ways to learn about an area, catch some fish, and make new friends.Guiding is one of the noblest professions in the world if you ask me. It takes years of dedication to the craft, the water, and the fish. That’s why people turn to a guide when they’re looking to catch fish in a new place. They teach you what to use, where to use it, how to use it, and when to use it. You’re getting years of experience crammed into your brain during a half day of fishing. It’s worth every penny.That being said, there are a couple things folks need to realize when they are looking to hire a guide. Sure, you’re paying them for a service, but that doesn’t make them your employee. Whenever I fish with a guide, I shut up, listen, and do what they say. Nine times out of ten, I’m catching fish and having a damn good time doing it. I’ve fished with guides in the Florida Keys for Permit, in Boca Grande for Tarpon, and in WNC for trout. Whether you’re fishing in a mountain stream, a wide inlet, or a coastal flat, it’s all the same.To get a professional opinion on the subject, I reached out to Wes Hodges, owner of Wesley Hodges Fly Fishing in Blacksburg, Va. He’s been fly fishing most of his life and knows a thing or two about guiding. Wes was kind enough to share his must-dos, must-don’ts, and his biggest pet peeves as a professional fishing guide.Wesley Hodges Fly FishingPhoto: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingRule Number One:  Never Be LateMy trips are almost always catered to a specific day and time of year, but also to the client’s needs. For instance, in the middle of summer, when the fish activity is at its peak early and late, I could start a trip at 6 a.m., 7 a.m., or even 1 p.m.  It all depends on the water, the hatches, and the fish. Nothing is constant in nature and my trip start times are dictated by that. If a client shows up late, we could miss the very time in which the fishing activity is at its peak.“I can’t control the fishing but I can damn sure control lunch!”Also, a guide should never be late for his trip.  That is never, ever good.  When that does happen, don’t make excuses.  Be a man and own up to your mistake. That is my number one pet peeve.  And yes, I have been late for a trip.Wesley Hodges Fly FishingPhoto: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingRule Number Two: Never Expect To Catch FishExpect to have a badass time and a good lunch. I have had clients that assumed their booking of a fishing trip would automatically result in world-class fishing as if I was Poseidon. Common statements and questions include:“How many fish should we catch today?”“I just want to catch a smallmouth over 22 inches!”“I caught over a hundred fish in Tenn. Should I expect that in Va.?”That is simply not the case. There are so many factors that go into a successful day of fishing. You have to account for the wind (especially in fly-fishing due to the casting), water flows on tailwater rivers, and sometimes the fish just don’t freaking eat.“Nothing good ever comes from an overly aggressive fly-cast.”I understand that clients get all amped up to fish because I know how I am when I get a day on the water.  I can’t blame them, but the clients need to remember that we are guides, not gods.  When I am faced with a client that expects those outcomes I simply reply with, “I can’t control the fishing but I can damn sure control lunch!”Wesley Hodges Fly FishingPhoto: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingRule Number Three:  Slow DownThis is very important for the client to understand. It does not directly impact me, but I want my clients to have the most enjoyable experience on the water. That experience needs to start with slowing down their life for that day, slowing down their mental state, and slowing down their cast. Nothing good ever comes from an overly aggressive fly-cast.One of my best trips was with the head honcho of a construction company. He desperately wanted to catch something larger than a Brook Trout, so I took him to a stream that holds large, wild Brown Trout. This man has worked so hard, for so long, that he worked every ounce of relaxation out of his soul. He put his waders on and set up his rod quickly. Hell, he even drank his scalding hot coffee in one large gulp.“Do I need to tie you up to that sycamore tree again?”In an effort to make this “bird dog” gentleman controllable, I calmly walked him down the stream and asked him to rest against a large tree sitting along the shoreline. I gave him clear directions, “Watch that run against the far bank, right below the fast water. When I get back from the truck, let me know how many trout you saw rise.”Photo: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingI came back in 20 minutes and the man was asleep, knocked out cold, resting against the large sycamore tree. I let him sleep for about another 20 minutes as I finished my coffee and tied our flies on. I asked him how many trout he saw rise and he replied, “Only one.”We caught that fish and many more wild browns on that trip. We didn’t share one word about his profession for the remainder of the day. We only talked about the important stuff in life; family, bird dogs, fine shotguns, streamers, and morel mushrooms. I still guide this man multiple times each year.  Whenever he is getting uncontrollable I will calmly say, “Do I need to tie you up to that sycamore tree again?”Wes Hodges is the owner of Wesley Hodges Fly Fishing in Blacksburg, Va. He guides fly fishing trips down the New River, on private water, and to remote destinations like Montana and Maine. Follow him on Instagram to keep up with his travels.Justin Forrest is an outdoor writer, fly fishing addict, and co-founder of Narrative North—based in Asheville, N.C. He posts pictures of cats and fishing on Instagram sometimes.last_img read more

Read More →

Home Depot settlement triggers legal battle

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Financial institutions faced another tough decision this week about whether to fight a settlement offer from a retailer hit by a data breach.According to documents filed Nov. 30 in a Georgia District Court, MasterCard and Home Depot have apparently reached a proposed settlement regarding the retailer’s September 2014 data breach. But attorneys for institutions suing Home Depot over the breach said the retailer won’t share the settlement agreement and is involved in sending “highly misleading and coercive” communications to financial institutions. continue reading »last_img read more

Read More →

Why Suffolk’s Water Protection Program Ruling Is A Win For Voters

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Environmentalists cheered recently when the New York State Court of Appeals upheld a lower court ruling that former Suffolk County Executive Steve Levy had illegally raided $30 million from Suffolk’s landmark Drinking Water Protection Program to plug a hole in the county’s budget. They called the decision a victory for the environment and for an important legal principle.“This is a huge win for taxpayers and for good government,” said Richard Amper, the Long Island Pine Barrens Society’s executive director.The problem is that Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, a Democrat, has to restore the money his Republican predecessor raided just as he’s introducing his 2016 budget, which so far calls for no hike in the general fund property tax, which has been frozen since he took office four years ago, but does raise police district taxes for the fourth time in a row.According to Bellone’s spokesman, Justin Meyers, the court decision “is not a budget buster in 2016,” because the county can pay the fund back over time, not in one fell swoop, at least that’s what the county executive is hoping to work out with the environmentalists once the details are ironed out in court.What Bellone can’t do is bend the rules the way Levy did because the highest Court in New York State has affirmed that once the people have voted their preference in a public referendum, its stipulation can’t be arbitrarily nullified on a whim when the coffers run dry—or the budget falls short.“The politicians can’t rewrite those laws or repeal them without going back to the public,” explained Paul Sabatino, one of the authors of more than two dozen public referenda in Suffolk County when he was the legislature’s counsel. The key legal principle, he explained, is the equivalency clause inserted in the referendum’s wording—a doctrine he introduced in 1983.“The public’s right to determine the outcome of a public referendum was carefully calibrated,” Sabatino said.In this case involving the water fund, Suffolk County voters agreed to tax themselves about $2.2 billion over 41 years and ensure that the money was allocated “according to a very specific formula,” he added. Explicitly part of the deal the public made by passing the referendum, Sabatino added, “was that nobody could come back and change that formula—or repeal it or modify it or whatever—without getting public approval.”Cynicism may have been part of his reasoning for making the equivalency clause binding.“I realized that you can’t trust the politicians,” Sabatino said. “They say one thing publicly and another thing privately.”Ironically, by the time Sabatino left Suffolk County government, he was chief deputy to County Executive Steve Levy with whom, it’s fair to say, he did not always see eye to eye. As soon as Levy became county executive in 2004, Sabatino recently told the Press, he “started to argue that the referendum was non-binding,” and he eventually persuaded the legislature that he could “change the drinking water protection program…and simply redirect the ways the money was going to be spent.”Apparently, Levy is still thinking that way, despite the Court of Appeals ruling on Aug. 27. In a letter he wrote to Newsday last week, the former county executive denied that the Suffolk water program was what Amper said it was: “Not true. It was a depository only for funds to stabilize sewer rates,” Levy wrote. “I discovered that the fund had been overtaxing the public for decades, leading to the point in which we had hundreds of millions of surplus dollars in the fund. So why not return at least part of that to the public as tax relief?”Not surprisingly, the Pine Barrens’ Amper disagrees with Levy’s interpretation.“Long Islanders are paying twice the national average in taxes but they always go to the polls to vote to give government more money if it’s for water protection,” said Amper. “The Levy administration raided $30 million from the Suffolk Drinking Water Protection Program, which was funded by a quarter of a penny sales tax that the public approved at referendum.”Responding to Levy’s action, the Pine Barrens Society and the Environmental Voters Forum sued in New York State Supreme Court, saying that the government could not take money earmarked by the public for water and use it for the general fund. A lower court dismissed the case but the environmentalists appealed, citing the equivalency cause, and the Appellate Court sided with them unanimously. The Bellone administration, which took office in 2012, fought that ruling, first in the Appellate Division, and, when that effort failed, before the Court of Appeals, the state’s highest judicial body, which just recently declined to consider Suffolk’s motion. So now the county has to put $30 million back into water protection as it faces a structural deficit and a decline in sales tax revenue.“Now it would be unfair to make Bellone responsible for Levy’s crime,” Amper told the Press, “so we need to sit down and agree upon the terms of the return of the money that Levy took with a more responsible Bellone administration.” The Pine Barrens Society will be joined by the Environmental Voters Forum in pressing for the fund’s full restitution before state Supreme Court Justice Joseph Farneti, who had sided against them in the first go-round.Speaking for the Bellone administration, Meyers told the Press that “we’re on the same page” with the environmentalists because water protection is one of the county executive’s most important priorities, and they hope to come to a restitution agreement soon.Sabatino, one of the three pro bono attorneys managing the litigation on behalf of the Pine Barrens—Jennifer Juengst and Regina Seltzer were the others—praised Amper for maintaining the integrity of the program created in 1987. It has been revised three times since then—all by public referendum.“He made a lot of compromises over the years,” said Sabatino, referring to Amper. “I give him a lot of credit.”The appreciation is mutual: The three attorneys will be honored for their public service work at the Pine Barrens Society’s 38th anniversary environmental awards gala in October.“This is a really important principle,” Sabatino reiterated. “On Long Island the voters have gradually lost their right to elect judges, to elect county-wide officials, to elect local officials, because there’s either cross endorsements or non-aggression pacts that increasingly take away the public’s right to decide. I think this is a huge victory for voter participation at a time of limited voter opportunities.”The Drinking Water Protection Program’s complicated details, for example, earmarking 11.75 percent for land, 25 percent for sewers, could boggle the layperson or the legislator perhaps, but Sabatino said the stipulations spelled out in the referendum had their purpose.“Why go to the trouble to write in all these specific percentages if politicians could then wipe them off the face of the Earth with just about a roll of toilet paper?” he exclaimed.As for the principle of using public referenda to resolve pressing issues facing New Yorkers, Sabatino acknowledged that Suffolk has “led the way” among the state’s counties.“Nassau doesn’t know how to do it,” he said, chuckling as he recounted the “totally illegal” referendum Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano put together in the summer of 2011 to see if the residents would approve a $400 million bond to renovate the Coliseum and thereby keep Charles Wang’s New York Islanders playing there. Though the county spent an estimated $2 million to hold the vote on Aug. 1st—not to mention how much time and money the Long Island Federation of Labor deployed to get the word out on behalf of the building trade unions—it was resoundingly rejected, 56-43, as roughly 17 percent of the county’s eligible voters trekked to the polls.But the effort was pointless, observed Sabatino, because the county executive’s administration had drafted an “advisory referendum” for the election, which, the Suffolk attorney said, “had absolutely no binding effect… Even if they [the voters] had adopted it, it would have been of no consequence.”So while the ice has melted in Nassau—at least for the Islanders and their hockey fans here—money may soon start flowing back into Suffolk’s water protection fund, at least until the next budget freezes over.last_img read more

Read More →

Rival drugmakers launch joint trial of medicines for COVID-19

first_imgTopics : The first segment will test whether Amgen’s psoriasis drug Otezla, Takeda’s anti-inflammatory Firazyr and AbbVie’s cenicriviroc, which has been tried in patients with HIV, will help with the overactive, and potentially damaging, immune response that sometimes happens in patients with severe COVID-19.The study’s “adaptive platform” means several treatment candidates can be tested at the same time, with the most promising moving forward and the least promising dropping out, Quantum Leap co-founder Dr. Laura Esserman told Reuters.”We could have some results in as early as six weeks,” she said, adding that additional drugs will soon be added to the roster.Company officials said Otezla may be able to suppress inflammation from an overactive immune response; Firazyr may help limit fluid in the lungs; and cenicriviroc, which blocks activity of certain immune system cells, could reduce the severity of acute respiratory distress caused by the virus. Rival drugmakers AbbVie Inc, Amgen Inc and Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc on Monday said they have begun treating patients in a trial to quickly show whether a drug from each company can be repurposed and used against COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.The COVID-19 pandemic is an “all hands on deck moment,” David Reese, Amgen’s research and development chief told Reuters. “We wanted a trial to be able to quickly sift through multiple agents and prioritize.”The study is a collaboration among pharmaceutical industry members of the recently-formed COVID Research & Development Alliance, Quantum Leap Healthcare Collaborative, a partnership of medical researchers and investors, and the Food and Drug Administration.center_img The drugs are being dosed in combination with Gilead Sciences Inc’s antiviral drug remdesivir and generic steroid dexamethasone, both of which have been shown in rigorous trials to help COVID-19 patients and are now considered to be standard care, Dr. Esserman said. A comparison group of patients will be given remdesivir and dexamethasone alone.Hospitals have tried other anti-inflammatory drugs in COVID-19 patients, including Regeneron’s Kevzara and Roche Holding’s Actemra, but trials of both arthritis drugs failed to show effectiveness. Roche is continuing to test Actemra in combination with remdesivir.The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ ongoing adaptive COVID-19 trial is studying remdesivir in combination with Olumiant, an arthritis drug sold by Eli Lilly & Co. Those results are expected next month.Since the outbreak began seven months ago, so far killing more than 675,000 people worldwide, hundreds of clinical trials have been launched around the world to test whether existing drugs or experimental compounds could be effective treatments.”There are a huge number of trials that for all the best intentions have been stood up around the world, but many are smaller – what we would call underpowered – and will not provide definitive answers,” Amgen’s Reese said. last_img read more

Read More →

Arsenal confirm signing of 17-year-old winger Joel Ideho from Ajax

first_imgArsenal confirm signing of 17-year-old winger Joel Ideho from Ajax Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 6 Oct 2020 1:38 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link6.7kShares Comment Joel Ideho has completed his move to Arsenal (Picture: Getty Images)Arsenal have confirmed the signing of teenage prospect Joel Idelho on a professional contract from Ajax.The 17-year-old winger only joined Ajax earlier this year from William II but has now moved to the Emirates where he will join the Professional Development Phase.The club website issued a statement welcoming Idelho in which he is described as a player ‘best known for his pace and accuracy.’The announcement came on Thursday, the day after Swedish striker Nikolaj Moller joined the club on a similar deal from Malmo.ADVERTISEMENTGoal report that the 18-year-old forward has signed a four-year deal at the Emirates in a move costing the Gunners around £450,000.AdvertisementAdvertisementBoth Ideho and Moller will join Per Mertesacker’s Academy and work under Steve Bould in the Under-23s as they look to work their way towards the first team under Mikel Arteta.More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityThe big signing for Arsenal this week was Thomas Partey, who joined late on deadline day from Atletico Madrid for £45m.‘We have been watching Thomas for a while, so we’re now delighted to add such a high quality player to our squad,’ said Arteta. ‘He is a dynamic midfielder with great energy. He brings a lot of experience from a top club that has competed at the highest level in La Liga and the Champions League for several years.‘We’re very impressed with his attitude and his approach to the game. He’s an intelligent footballer and we’re looking forward to him integrating into our system and contributing to the progress we’re building at the moment at the club.’MORE: Mesut Ozil facing permanent Arsenal squad axe as Mikel Arteta must leave out two playersMORE: ‘This family will always be a part of me’ – Thomas Partey sends heartfelt message to Atletico Madrid following Arsenal moveFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page.center_img Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

Read More →

Majority of Kiwis still against legalising cannabis, according to latest 1 NEWS Colmar Brunton poll

first_imgLegalise: 40% (up 1 from February’s poll)Remain illegal: 49% (down 2)Will not vote: 1%Don’t know/refused: 11% (down 2) “We’re quietly confident that this number (49 opposed) will continue through the referendum.” “We’ve been supplying a lot of information, speakers and other experts…we’ve not provided funding at this stage because there just hasn’t been a need at this point but we are fully partnered with this affiliate in New Zealand,” he said.READ MORE: https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/majority-kiwis-still-against-legalising-cannabis-according-latest-1-news-colmar-brunton-poll Mr Niforatos said the US group has been helping its New Zealand partner where it can. SAM New Zealand has taken its name from, and is working closely, with an American lobby group which opposes legal cannabis.center_img *Percentages do not add to 100% due to rounding.The spokesperson for Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) New Zealand, Aaron Ironside, which is running the Say Nope to Dope campaign, said “most Kiwi families know that legalisation is not a great idea”. TVNZ One News 29 June 2020Family First Comment: Excellent result – despite a significant spend by the Drug Foundation ($300k)..“According to the poll, those more likely than average to be against legalising cannabis are National Party supporters and people aged 70 and over. Those more likely than average to be for the legalisation of cannabis are Green and Labour Party supporters, people aged 18-29, Wellingtonians and Māori.”Kiwis who were hoping they might soon be able to smoke cannabis legally might be out of luck, according to the latest 1 NEWS Colmar Brunton poll.Those polled were asked if they are planning on voting for cannabis to be legalised or to remain illegal at this year’s referendum: Smart Approaches to Marijuana US vice president Luke Niforatos told 1 NEWS he “strongly recommends New Zealanders vote no in this very misguided initiative”.last_img read more

Read More →

Foreign policy centrepiece of CARICOM summit

first_imgNewsRegional Foreign policy centrepiece of CARICOM summit by: – July 4, 2012 Tweet Share CASTRIES, St Lucia — Foreign policy co-ordination in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) is high on the agenda of the 33rd regular meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government beginning on Wednesday in Saint Lucia. The leaders will be examining the thrust of the Community’s foreign policy approach given the ongoing changes in global political and economic circumstances. These changes pose challenges to the continuing development of the Community as well as for the practice of the Community’s external and political relations. However, they also create opportunities that can be exploited to the benefit of the Community. The three-day meeting of the leaders will be presided over by incoming CARICOM chairman Dr Kenny Anthony, prime minister of Saint Lucia, and it is expected that, with the exception of the prime minister of Belize, all heads of government will be present. The ongoing reform process in the Community will be up for discussion as will developments in Haiti and matters in relation to youth development in particular arising out of the recent high level meeting between the youth of CARICOM and the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR). The meeting of the heads of government will be preceded by the meetings of the Council for Finance and Planning (COFAP) on Monday and the Prime Ministerial Sub-Committees on the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) and on External Negotiations on Tuesday. Recommendations coming out of these sessions will also be placed before the heads of government. Caribbean News Now Sharing is caring!center_img Share 10 Views   no discussions Sharelast_img read more

Read More →