Honan Race gains ground

first_imgHundreds of Harvard students, alumni, and staff, along with the Harvard University Band, crossed the Charles River this past weekend to run in the 10th annual Brian J. Honan 5K Road Race.Almost 700 Harvard-affiliated runners — nearly double the number of participants last year — were among the 1,800 runners on Sunday. The race benefits the Brian J. Honan Charitable Fund, with Harvard-affiliated runners sponsored by Harvard Public Affairs & Communications and the Harvard Business School.Kevin G. Honan, state representative for Allston-Brighton, and Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino were on hand to start the race and celebrate Brian Honan’s legacy.“Brian was a very special person who cared about his constituents,” said Menino. “He’s remembered by so many young people through the Brian J. Honan Fellowship” — a program that engages youth across Boston, developing leadership skills and stimulating interest in public service — “and I meet with those kids every year. To be here today to support Brian and that next generation of leaders, to give back to the community, is really important.”Menino, who received an honorary degree at Harvard’s 2013 commencement last May, added that the University’s yearly involvement in the race was vital to the community.“Harvard participates in so many events,” ranging from “today’s race to after-school programs in local schools,” he said. “It’s just an integral part of the Allston neighborhood.”For Kevin Honan — brother to Brian, a Boston City Council representative for Allston-Brighton who died in 2002 — the event connects members of the community and honors his brother’s legacy of public service.“The road race has really brought the neighborhood together,” Honan said. “Allston-Brighton residents and local colleges, especially Harvard. Their participation really helps this race, no doubt about it, and Harvard’s really stepped up to help make this race a success.”For Christine Heenan, Harvard’s vice president for public affairs and communications, whose department sponsored more than 500 runners, it was a day to celebrate community.  “As a member of the Allston community, Harvard is proud to join our students, faculty, and staff with Allston-Brighton residents and Boston’s leadership for a day of fitness and fun. We love this race.”Abel Arwaga ’15 of Quincy House said the race was a chance to challenge himself physically and explore the neighborhood.“This is my first time running in this race, and I’ve never been to this area,” said Arwaga, who’s “working his way up” to running in the Boston Marathon. “I thought Boston was a small town, but it’s so big, and there’s so much more to it than just Cambridge and downtown. It’s great to see it and be a part of it. I’ll definitely be back next year.”Craig Rodgers, a counselor at Harvard’s Bureau of Study Counsel, ran the 5K for the seventh time. A leader with Harvard On the Move, he took a team of almost 70 runners on a pre-race run from Weld Boathouse to the Honan race site.“It’s a huge bonding experience for the entire Harvard community,” Rodgers said. “It’s an opportunity for students, staff, and faculty who normally don’t hang out together to get to know each other doing something completely nonacademic, which is why you see so many smiling faces.”Harvard Ph.D. candidate Bo Waggoner was among them.  He emerged the winner, with a race time of 14:58.  And at least half the top 10 finishers were affiliated with Harvard.For Jacques Goupil, the race is a family tradition. Goupil, who lives in the Oak Square neighborhood in Brighton, ran while pushing a stroller holding his sons Sebastian, age 5, and Jonah, 3. His wife, Nicole, also ran, pushing their youngest child in a stroller.“We met Kevin Honan a while back, and we love the community,” said Goupil, adding that he was also there to support the Oak Square YMCA’s Oaktoberfest 5K.Ally Freedy ’14, student manager of the Harvard University Band, was delighted that the band was able to perform at the race, as well as marching in the 30th annual Allston-Brighton Day Parade that immediately followed. A busy football season schedule had prevented the band from playing at the race until this year.“We really wanted to try and make this happen,” Freedy said. “We love participating in community events. We lead the parade for Duckling Day in Boston and play Christmas caroling around the city, so we’re really happy to be here. It was a good time.”Mitchell Dong ’75, who divides his time between Harvard Square and New York City, came to town for The Harvard Campaign launch and decided to join the race as well.“Brian Honan was a great councilor,” he said. “This race is a great opportunity to meet people, hang out with friends, and run. Coming out to local neighborhoods really connects with the community. It’s a beautiful day, and a great event.”last_img read more

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A vivid life

first_imgFor this weekend only, the Harvard Art Museums will feature two floors’ worth of Rothko.As part of the “Intersections” series, which juxtaposes student and faculty performances with the Harvard Art Museums’ collections, the Division of Academic and Public Programs will premiere “Red,” a bio-drama about the abstract expressionist Mark Rothko by American writer John Logan. Andrew Gelfand ’15 and Megan Jones ’16, under the tutelage of student outreach and program coordinator Erin Northington, produced the show to work in concert with “Rothko’s Harvard Murals” exhibit.“Intersections” is “using other forms of artistic expression to interpret and inform the collections here at the museums,” said Gelfand.Running 90 minutes, “Red” not only provides the contextual fuel to illuminate the layers beneath Rothko’s art, but also captures the fire behind every brush stroke. Opening in Rothko’s Bowery studio in 1958, the play spans two years, with the painter focused on his $35,000 commission for what would become the “Seagram Murals” at the new Four Seasons. “Thirty-five thousand dollars they are paying me,” he says to Ken, his (fictional) assistant and the only other character in the play, with a wry smile. “No other painter comes close.”The smile is fleeting.From the outset, it’s evident that Rothko is a complex and tragic figure, brooding with opinions on what art should be and how it should be produced. Ken, played by Kevin Hilgartner ’16, is used to great effect as a foil, bringing forward the painter’s innermost thoughts and desires through argument and discourse. Their war of words — commercialism vs. artistic purity, abstract vs. pop art — is colored with passion.As a fictional work (if based on real events), the play has the freedom to journey into the myth of the man. The producers took this freedom one step further: Cast in the lead role is Katherine Moon ’14.“We originally put out the role as a male part and Katherine approached us during common casting,” said Gelfand. “She asked if she could read for Rothko. I was talking to my co-producer and said ‘Why not?’ At the end of the day, she earned the role. Her force, her presence — it really makes this character who he is.”From the very first line, Moon, as Rothko, challenges the audience to meditate quietly, search deep within, and answer this simple question: “What do you see?”Ken’s initial response is a timid one, but over the course of the piece he develops the confidence to ask a few questions of his own. The drama between the two men takes the spotlight, with painting serving as a backdrop.Unfortunately for the production crew, stage directions that called for vibrant scenes of brush strokes and paint mixing had to be nixed. Menschel Hall, the first-floor lecture space designated for the play, is unsuitable for such theatrics. As a compromise, projections designer Daniel Citron built a set of computer animations to be projected in accompaniment to the actors’ performances. Carefully choreographed to demonstrate the act of applying paint, the digital projections cast Rothko’s work in a whole new light. The production team also plans to project animated canvases along the walls and ceilings of the auditorium, to surround every seat in a spectrum of red.After the curtain call, make sure to take the stairs to Level 3, Room 3500. In the Special Exhibitions Gallery, look for “Panel One.” What do you see? Wait. Move closer. Now, what do you see?The May 1 performance of “Red,” at 7 p.m., is open to students only; performances Saturday and Sunday (both at 1 p.m.) are open to the public. “Red” is being performed during Arts First (April 30-May 3), an annual festival organized by the Office for the Arts.last_img read more

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Why direct mail still matters in the digital age

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Yes, it may seem odd in an age of SEO and retargeting to be talking about mail — the kind you can touch. Yet direct mail at the ripe old age of 170 remains a consistent performer for acquiring and maintaining relationships with consumers. It shouldn’t be overlooked, even as banks and credit unions increasingly use digital marketing channels.In fact, by applying the four recommendations described below, the relevancy of direct mail will continue to improve for financial marketers. Used together, they will advance your ability to reach key audiences, connect with them through one-to-one personalized experiences, and reduce print production times.1. Focus on Key AudiencesMillennials, Gen Z and women are key target audiences for any financial marketer’s strategic plan. Millennials currently make up 30% of the population, according to Brookings, and those in Generation Z represent 32%, Bloomberg calculates. Together these larger cohorts comprise nearly two-thirds of the population, are digital natives, and are digitally connected. Logically this should make them prime targets for digital advertising, right? Actually they are the most likely to avoid digital advertising. continue reading »last_img read more

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OpEd: Working Together Key For Economic Recovery

first_imgSign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.,Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Around 15 years ago as a research assistant working on climate change policy, I had proposed both a top-down and bottom-up approach to the imminent danger of sea level rise and more frequent/stronger storms on Long Island. The Kyoto Protocol seemed as important as local nonprofits educating our residents on the benefits of renewable energy and living sustainably. Success was contingent on all taking on the cause. While climate change still looms on the horizon, another peril has taken root of our lives, our economy, and our future. I would argue that again we need a combination of federal and state leadership and assistance, combined with a local approach from a policy standpoint. While some federal support arrived through programs like the Paycheck Protection Program and program-based assistance trickled down to municipalities from the CARES Act, local governments are facing a budget crisis of unprecedented proportions and need direct assistance. Small business continues to struggle and the effect on the downtown landscape has been catastrophic. However, communities have been coming together in an incredible way.  Business improvement districts and chambers of commerce have ramped up efforts to incentivize shopping at local businesses. Local governments have streamlined approvals to providing innovative solutions for outdoor and tented dining and entertainment. Nonprofits have worked to provide meals and other necessities to those most in need, with those numbers growing by the day. Still, it is not enough.Big problems require bold solutions, as was seen with the Great Depression and Great Recession of 2008. We need a federal stimulus package that will take on the infrastructure crisis facing our country, in turn stimulating the economy by putting people back to work and retaining and attracting residents and businesses to our region. Alternative funding streams for essentials such as clean water, safe roads/tunnels/bridges, reliable public transportation networks and sustainable energy is paramount.      In addition, industrial development agencies (IDAs) are not the enemy. Financial incentives, once passing the rigors of the “but for” test and cost/benefit analysis, are an effective tool for stimulating local economic development. IDAs provide municipalities with the tools to transform vacant and underutilized properties producing little to no taxes into projects that work to retain and attract residents, businesses and jobs, while also providing reliable revenue streams for the affected tax jurisdictions. Payment in Lieu of Taxes or PILOT is a misleading term as it implies that taxes are lost instead of gained. PILOT payments are intended to generate more in revenue than what would have been seen without the project, including the spin-off benefit of increased local spending. At a time where blue-color jobs with immediate availability are at a premium, construction puts people back to work, and locally. This cannot and should not be dismissed. Ann Fangmann is executive director of the Glen Cove Community Development Agency and the city’s Industrial Development Agency.For more opinions visit longislandpress.com/category/opinions.last_img read more

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Scary Is How You Act, Not Look, Disability Advocates Tell Filmmakers

first_imgWarner Bros. has pleaded ignorance, saying it worked with the film’s artists to create a fresh interpretation of what Dahl described as “thin curvy claws, like a cat,” never intending for viewers to feel represented by the “fantastical, nonhuman creatures” onscreen. Hathaway, in her apology, said she had not associated her character’s hands with limb differences, and if she had, the depiction wouldn’t have happened at all. Advocates are conscious of the criticism that the world has become too hypervigilant, and that the blowback against “The Witches” is another example of political correctness hammering away at artistic expression. Certainly what’s deemed acceptable has changed over time. There was scant criticism of Anjelica Huston’s ghoulish Grand High Witch in the 1990 film version, or for the 1980s character of Sloth, the monster in “The Goonies” (though, spoiler alert, he ended up being a good guy).Yet even as stereotypical portrayals of other marginalized groups are increasingly recognized as problematic, the disfigured villain has proved harder to rout. In the forthcoming Bond film “No Time to Die,” Rami Malek and Christoph Waltz both play criminals who have facial disfigurements.“Obviously, we don’t want a culture where everyone’s outraged about everything,” said Ashley Eakin, a writer and director who has Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome, which affects the growth and formation of bones. “For so long, disability has been underrepresented, so if we only see disfigurement in a villain or character with no redeeming qualities, that’s an issue.” – Advertisement – – Advertisement – For as long as there have been stages and screens, disability and disfigurement have been used as visual shorthand for evildoing — a nod to the audience that a character was a baddie to be feared. But disability rights advocates say this amounts not just to lazy storytelling but stereotyping, further marginalizing an already stigmatized community that is rarely represented onscreen. That “The Witches” is a family film, they say, made it worse.“Playgrounds are where kids are sometimes the cruelest, and kids absorb what they learn, be it through stories we tell or what they learn from their parents,” said Penny Loker, a Canadian visible difference advocate and writer. “They have carte balance to be cruel to people. I was called a monster, and I was called whatever the name of the monster was from the movie that was popular at that time.”People with disabilities have had some success in challenging the stereotype. In 2018, spurred by a campaign for accurate portrayals of disabilities, the British Film Institute announced it would no longer fund films whose villains have scarred or disfigured faces. People with limb differences, including paralympians and a “Great British Baking Show” semifinalist, posted photos of their hands and arms on social media with the hashtag #NotAWitch. While Hathaway and Warner Bros. apologized, many saw the damage as already done. Here, yet again, was a villain with a disability, one of the oldest, and, for many, most damaging, storytelling tropes still around.“This isn’t about being overly sensitive, a ‘snowflake’ or being too politically correct,” Briony May Williams, the British baking competitor, wrote on Instagram. “This is about showcasing limb differences as ugly, scary, gross and evil.” The Joker. Lord Voldemort. All manner of scarred Bond villains and superhero antagonists. Dr. Poison. Freddy Krueger. The Phantom of the Opera. Shakespeare’s hunchbacked, butcherous Richard the Third.center_img When “The Witches,” starring Anne Hathaway as the Grand High Witch, was released last month, a collective groan went up from people with disabilities.The movie, based on a Roald Dahl children’s book, depicted Hathaway with hands that were wizened and disfigured, with two fingers and a thumb on each. The studio said her hands were meant to resemble cat claws, but they looked a whole lot like split hands, or ectrodactyly.- Advertisement – One in four adults in the United States have a physical or mental impairment that sharply limits activities; a recent study found that less than 2 percent of characters with speaking parts in top movies from 2018 were disabled. While advocacy groups are working with studios to change that, critics say disabled characters still fall too often into predictable buckets, among them the villain or the victim that provides uplift for all, which some have nicknamed “inspiration porn.”“Disabled people either play villains or happy snowflake angel babies,” said Maysoon Zayid, a comedian, writer and actor who has cerebral palsy. “We’re either charitable, inspirational, never do naughty things in our life. Or we’re murdering babies because we lost an eye in a dart accident.” Disability rights advocates said the whole matter could have been avoided if more disabled people were in the entertainment industry, be it in front of the camera or behind the scenes. “If there were writers, directors or other crew members with disabilities, they, might have seen it and said ‘Huh, maybe this is an issue,’” said Lauren Appelbaum, vice president of communications for RespectAbility, a nonprofit organization fighting the stigmatization of people with disabilities.There is more leeway, and less potential to offend, when villains are clearly fantastical creatures, unreal figments of imagination, like the Shadow Monster in “Stranger Things.”Still, the question for many remains why clearly human or human-esque villains need to have visual signifiers connoting evil at all. Many of the scariest horror film characters have been able-bodied. Like Samara, the unstoppable long-tressed dead girl in “The Ring,” or Jack Nicholson’s possessed writer in “The Shining.” Or — shudder — Javier Bardem in “No Country for Old Men,” with his creepy, pasty pallor and Dorothy Hamill bob. But even such depictions tread a fine line, threatening to lapse into the timeworn indictment of mental illness, à la Norman Bates in “Psycho.”“Monstrosity is something in all of us,” Smith said, “not something out there in a bodily form different than our own.” In Zayid’s view, there are limited circumstances under which it’s OK for a villain to be disabled or disfigured. One is when a disabled actor is playing the character, she said, so long as the disfigurement is not what makes them evil. The other is when the evil person being portrayed is a person who has a disability in real life, and even then, Zayid maintains, only a disabled actor should be cast.Using disability or disfigurement as shorthand for evil goes back centuries in Western culture, said Angela Smith, director of disability studies at the University of Utah. In both lore and real life, physical differences have been read as warnings of danger, symbols of evil, or evidence of sinning or witchcraft. The eugenics movement tapped into this, measuring deviations from assumed norms, Smith said, and the presupposition that disability is something negative in need of fixing continues to inform modern medicine.It’s also a long standing trope in fairy tales and fantasy and horror stories. Monsters are given characteristics — the way they talk, behave, look or move — that are meant to seem threatening or grotesque, Smith noted. This carries onscreen, where physical differences are often revealed dramatically as visual shorthand for evilness or immorality: think of Freddy Krueger’s brutally burned face in the “Nightmare on Elm Street” films. All of which, Smith said, subtly shapes perceptions about an already marginalized community, whether “The Witches” intended to or not.“Popular films like this send very clear messages: that disabled bodies are wrong or evil, that they don’t belong in ‘normal’ society or public view, that it is ‘natural’ to be disgusted by difference,” Smith wrote in an email. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Osijek-Baranja County paid one million kuna in support to family farms and rural households

first_imgThis is a category of business entities that are not covered by measures from the state budget to overcome the consequences of the coronavirus epidemic, and as the tourism sector is among the most endangered activities, Osijek-Baranja County approved financial support from its budget. The head of the Administrative Department for Tourism, Culture and Sports, Tatjana Roth, pointed out that HRK 1,7 million had been provided for this type of support, and that family farms and households had expressed the need for the currently agreed HRK 1,06 million. Osijek-Baranja County awarded grants to representatives of 29 family farms and rural households that provide accommodation services in the Osijek-Baranja County. The activities of the beneficiaries are catering services for the preparation and serving of food, beverages and beverages from agricultural products, mostly own production, accommodation services and other services in the function of tourist consumption. Osijek-Baranja County began preparing for subsidies at the beginning of the year when it was clear that the pandemic would create huge problems in the economy, agriculture and tourism, said County Prefect Ivan Anušić, adding: “We waited for state aid to see who would get it and to avoid duplication and for the aid to come to the right address. The total amount of all subsidies we have given to entrepreneurs, craftsmen, farmers and those who work in tourism is 17 million kuna, of which 11,2 million is intended for the economy. The current granting of support, in the total amount of HRK 1,06 million to beneficiaries engaged in tourism and accommodation facilities, keeps continental tourism alive in the area of ​​our county. The grants are of high quality and represent concrete help for the beneficiaries to overcome this crisis period and to continue the development of continental tourism in our area. We will continue with subsidies next year, not only financially but also through infrastructure, because we want tourism in Osijek-Baranja County to be one of the better industries.Said Prefect Anusic.center_img Namely, the condition for support was a reduced income of 30 percent in June this year compared to June last year, which also means that part of the family farms still operated relatively well. Currently, 55% of overnight stays and tourist arrivals are realized compared to the same period last year. Support for individual family farms and rural households by accommodation capacity, ie bed is up to 5.000,00 kuna, and the total value of the contracts signed today is HRK 1,06 million. Photo: Baranja Houselast_img read more

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People moves: LD’s new chief; ex-MP appointed PME trustee

first_imgLD, Sampension, PME, Delta Lloyd, Lombard Odier IM, Vanguard, PwC, FCA, Robeco, WisdomTree, Mirae Asset, BlueBay, Montae, AltisLD/Sampension – Charlotte Mark has been appointed as the new finance director at Denmark’s Lønmodtagernes Dyrtidsfond (LD), and will start the job on 1 September. She is replacing Lars Wallberg who has now left the pension fund to be chief executive of Norliv, the company collectively owned by Nordea Life & Pension Denmark customers.Mark is currently head of equities and alternatives at Sampension, where she has worked for 16 years. Sampension said it had started the process of recruiting a replacement. In her new role at LD, Mark will be responsible for the investment of LD’s DKK43bn (€5.8bn) of assets and will also be head of the pension fund’s financial operations.PME – Roos Vermeij has been appointed as executive trustee at the €45bn PME, the pension fund for the metal and electro-technical engineering industry. Vermeij will be tasked with pensions and social security in the three-strong team of Eric Uijen (chairman) and Marcel Andringa (asset management). Vermeij was an MP for the Dutch Labour party (PvdA) from 2006 until March, and was the party’s spokesperson for pensions and social security. Prior to this, she was a director at TransLink Systems, the company which developed the Oyster Card travel payment system in the Netherlands. Vermeij succeeds Mariëtte Simons, who was recently appointed on the board of the €187bn healthcare pension fund PFZW. Delta Lloyd AM – Jacco Maters, chief executive and CIO at Delta Lloyd Asset Management, has left the company, which was recently taken over by NN Group. Satish Bapat, CEO of NN Investment Partners, has also become chief executive of Delta Lloyd AM, as both asset managers are to be merged.Rob van Mazijk, chief operations officer at Delta Lloyd, will stay on until year-end as a special adviser to Bob Overbeek, NN IP’s COO. During the integration process, Van Mazijk is to contribute to continuity and stability at Delta Lloyd. Anticipating the merger, several management staff have left Delta Lloyd AM. Arnold Gast, head of the investment office, departed last month. Chief risk officer Jelle Ritzerveld will leave as of 1 August.Lombard Odier Investment Managers – Lombard Odier IM has hired Ritesh Bamania as head of solutions for institutional clients. He joins from Mercer where he was a senior investment consultant. He has also worked at UBS Global Asset Management and Willis Towers Watson. Carolina Minio-Paluello, global head of sales and solutions at Lombard Odier IM, said “A solutions-based approach has never been more important to help investors meet their complex objectives.”Vanguard – Thomas Merz has been named head of European distribution ex-UK, a newly created role, at Vanguard, the giant passive fund manager. He is based in Zurich and joins from UBS Global Asset Management, where he was head of exchange-traded funds (ETFs).PwC – The accounting and consultancy giant has hired Marcus Fink to its pensions legal team. He joins from Ashurst where he led the pensions practice. In a statement, PwC said Fink had “particular experience in pensions investment matters, particularly negotiating and overseeing derivative and hedging investments, implementing asset-backed funding vehicles”.Financial Conduct Authority – Anne Richards has been appointed chair of the UK regulator’s Practitioner Panel from 1 August. She is chief executive at M&G, a position she took on a year ago. The Practitioner Panel providers feedback on policy and regulations from regulated firms to the Financial Conduct Authority. In addition, John Trundle has been named chair of the Markets Practitioner Panel. He is CEO of Euroclear UK & Ireland.Robeco – The Dutch asset manager has appointed Ralph van Daalen as a member of its institutional relations team, starting on 1 August. Van Daalen, who has more than 14 years experience in the financial sector, will focus on extending Robeco’s domestic operations, in particular pension funds and insurance companies. He will report to Hilko de Brouwer, who has recently been appointed head of institutional relations in the Netherlands and the Nordics. Van Daalen joins from BMO Global Asset Management, where he was responsible for institutional sales in the Netherlands. Prior to this, he was senior investment adviser for pension funds at Willis Towers Watson.WisdomTree – The US ETF provider has named Alexis Marinof as head of European distribution. He was formerly head of State Street Global Advisors’ SPDR ETF business for Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA), and held a number of other senior roles at the company. He replaces Morgan Lee, who has transferred to the US to lead WisdomTree’s distribution on the west coast of the country.David Abner, head of Europe at WisdomTree, said: “Alexis brings exceptional industry knowledge from his experience at State Street Global Advisors, where he managed all aspects of the EMEA ETF business across a diverse client base. I look forward to Alexis’s contributions as part of our ongoing efforts to expand and deepen the relationships we have across our diverse pan-European investors and traders.”Mirae Asset – The specialist Asian investment group has hired Christina Eriksson as its head of Nordic sales. She was previously at Investec Asset Management where she worked on sales in the Nordics and Switzerland. Mirae Asset said Eriksson would be responsible for the distribution of “investment solutions”.BlueBay Asset Management – The specialist fixed income manager has hired Zhenbo Hou to its emerging markets research team. He was previously senior officer for macroeconomic research at the Bank of China. The appointment comes as China attempts to open up its fixed income markets through the establishment of Bond Connect, a trading link between Hong Kong and mainland China.Montae – Vandena van der Meer has become a partner at Dutch consultant Montae, responsible for advice to employers and works councils. Van der Meer has been a senior adviser at Rijswijk-based Montae since 2012. Prior to this, she worked as pensions consultant at PwC.Altis Investments – NN IP’s subsidiary for manager selection and monitoring has appointed Maarten Roth, Benoit Jacquemont, and Danny Wemmenhove as new team members. As of 1 September, Roth is to start as senior portfolio manager for equities in The Hague. He joined from Blue Sky Group and also worked at ING and Rabobank. Jacquemont has already started as senior portfolio manager for fixed income in The Hague. Previously, he has been employed by Cardano, Deloitte and State Street. Wemmenhove has also started as portfolio manager for equities, based in Switzerland. He has worked at the asset managers PGGM and Actiam.last_img read more

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Scotland opens £20 million low-carbon treasure chest

first_imgThe Scottish government has called the low-carbon energy project developers to apply for a share of £20 million supplied through the Energy Investment Fund.The Energy Investment Fund (EIF) provides funding for renewable and low-carbon energy solutions through flexible loans and equity investments, all on fully commercial terms.A total of £20 million has been allocated to EIF for distribution by March 31, 2019, for the initiatives that increase community ownership of energy projects, and accelerate development of commercial low-carbon energy projects in Scotland.Eligible projects must have a demonstrable funding gap, be located in Scotland and have the potential to provide economic benefits to the country, according to EIF.Consideration will be given to both the short and long-term economic impact of projects, and will include a focus on both the fit with the Scottish government’s Energy Strategy and the impact.Priority will be given to submissions received by July 20, 2018, while the submissions received after that date will also be considered depending on availability of budget.Projects must be able to evidence the expected carbon emission reduction associated with the project and use no more than 20% fossil fuels – including gas – within the primary fuel source for generation projects.The fund will not provide funding for R&D, feasibility or pre-development costs, according to the government.EIF is a Scottish government fund managed and delivered by the Scottish Investment Bank. It builds on the success of the Renewable Energy Investment Fund, providing commercial investment for renewable and low carbon energy solutions.last_img read more

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Steve Ahaus

first_imgSteve Ahaus, 49 of Moores Mill, passed away Tuesday January 24, 2017 due to a car accident. Steve was born Sunday January 21, 1968 in Lawrenceburg, IN; the son of Clarence and Betty (Sebree) Perkins. He got together with Shawnee (Baker) Ahaus February 28, 2006 and got married August 30, 2015 and she survives.Steve worked at Day precision Wall INC. in Cleves, OH as a laborer.  He loved coaching baseball; watching football especially the Bengals playing and just joy riding in the country.  He most enjoyed spending time with his family and friends.Steve is survived by wife: Shawnee Ahaus of Moores Hill; Daughters: Danielle Johnson of Madison, IN; Keshia Baker of Osgood; Sons: Robert (Tonia) Eggleston of Versailles; William (Amber) Grace of Moores Hill; Steven Johnson of Rising Sun. Brother: Randy Ahaus of Osgood; Sisters: Janet Smith of KY; Peggy (James) Mullenger, Linda (James) Proctor; Susan (Robert) Schafer all of Ohio.  11 Grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents.Funeral service will be 12 PM Monday January 30, 2017 at Moores Hill Church of Christ 13567 State Road 350 Moores Hill, IN 47032 with Tito Pel officiating.  Burial will follow in Forest Hill Cemetery, Moores Hill. Visitation will be 10AM-12PM Monday also at the church.  Memorials may be given to the family.  Sibbett-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, Box 156, Moores Hill, IN 47032. (812)744-3280.  Go to www.sibbettmoore.com to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more

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Schwein, Gottschalk repeat at RPM Speedway

first_imgBy Mike HughesHAYS, Kan. (April 23) – Jakob Schwein and Daniel Gottschalk both made it two in a row in their respective divisions in racing action at RPM Speedway Saturday evening.Schwein made it two in a row in the Cutting Edge Collision IMCA Sport Compact main event. Schwein led all 12 laps to make his way to the winner’s circle. Amber Bird finished in the runner-up spot, trailed by Brandon Wise, Toby Schwein and Billy Turner.Gottschalk made it two in a row in the Golden B Hydra Drilling IMCA Northern SportMod feature. Brenden Damon took the early lead and appeared to have the race well in hand, but car problems sent him to the infield on lap eight, handing over the lead to Blaine Walt.Walt’s lead was short-lived as Brian Davidson took the lead at the halfway mark of the 20-lap race. A caution on lap 15 put 11th starting Gottschalk behind Davidson on the restart and Gottschalk, who won Friday night at Oberlin, took advantage as he took the lead on the restart and held on for the win.Walt finished second, followed by 17th starting Tracy Holloway, Trenton Kleweno and Dakota Sproul.Bruce Plumisto took the lead from Austin Carter on lap nine of the Advantage Glass Plus IMCA Stock Car feature and held off a charge by Kyle Pfeifer, the Friday night feature winner at Oberlin, for the win.The NAPA Auto Parts/Gib’s Auto Supply IMCA Modified feature saw Clay Money make his way to the winner’s circle. Money took the lead from Mike Petersilie and drove on for the win.The 20-lap Golden Plains Trucking IMCA Hobby Stock feature saw Robert Leonard lead the entire distance in the caution-filled event.The evening’s races were dedicated to Cody Younger, lost but not forgotten.last_img read more

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