Umphrey’s McGee Announces Three Nights At Red Rocks

first_imgThis weekend marks the 20th anniversary celebration of Umphrey’s McGee. With a full winter/spring tour ahead of them, starting with three nights at the Beacon Theatre this weekend (don’t miss the late night shows with TAUKing McGee and Wyllys & The Will To Live!), the Chicago-based rockers have just announced their first summer play. On July 5, 6, and 7, Umphrey’s McGee will make their return to the famed Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Morrison, CO for their annual Independence Day weekend tradition with a six-set triple-header. The show will feature support from an impressive lineup comprised of some of today’s most talented musicians. Stay tuned for the full lineup announcement coming soon!Discounted, early bird three-day and single-day tickets as well as umVIP enhanced experience tickets and travel packages, will be available during the band’s pre-sale beginning Tuesday, January 24th at 12PM EST. This year, umVIP members will be treated to one of the band’s finest offerings to date, a private seventh set. Full umVIP details to be announced Monday, January 23rd. General on-sale will begin Friday, February 2nd at 12PM EST. For all ticket information, please visit the band’s website.Full tour routing is below.UMPHREY’S MCGEE TOUR DATES:January 19 New York, NY @ The Beacon TheatreJanuary 20 New York, NY @ The Beacon TheatreJanuary 21 New York, NY @ The Beacon TheatreJanuary 25 New Haven, CT @ College Street Music HallJanuary 26 Philadelphia, PA @ The FillmoreJanuary 27 Philadelphia, PA @ The FillmoreJanuary 28 Jim Thorpe, PA @ Penn’s PeakFebruary 1 Columbus, OH @ Express Live!February 2 Kalamazoo, MI @ Wings Event CenterFebruary 3 Kalamazoo, MI @ Wings Event CenterFebruary 15 Washington, DC @ The AnthemFebruary 16 Asheville, NC @ ExploreAsheville.com ArenaFebruary 17 Asheville, NC @ ExploreAsheville.com ArenaFebruary 18 Tampa, FL @ WhigFest Music & Arts FestivalMarch 7 Aspen, CO @ Belly Up AspenMarch 8 Aspen, CO @ Belly Up AspenMarch 9 Aspen, CO @ Belly Up AspenMarch 10 Salt Lake City UT @ The ComplexMarch 14 Missoula, MT @ The WilmaMarch 15 Seattle, WA @ The ShowboxMarch 16 Portland, OR @ Crystal BallroomMarch 17 Portland, OR @ Crystal BallroomMarch 22 South Lake Tahoe, CA @ Harrah’s Lake TahoeMarch 23 Oakland, CA @ The Fox OaklandMarch 24 Los Angeles, CA @ The WilternMarch 25 San Diego, CA @ The Observatory North Parklast_img read more

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Faculty Council meeting held April 30

first_imgOn April 30 the members of the Faculty Council approved preliminary versions of the University Extension School courses for 2014-15 and Courses of Instruction for 2014-15. They also approved changes to the Handbook for Students and a proposal to change the name of the undergraduate concentration Literature to Comparative Literature.  In addition, they continued their discussion of academic integrity and approved proposed legislation regarding this matter.The council next meets on May 14. The last regular meeting of the faculty will be on May 6.last_img read more

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Uncovering a ‘smoking gun’ in age-related disease

first_imgAging is a key risk factor for a variety of devastating, chronic diseases, yet the biological factors that influence when and how rapidly cells deteriorate over time remain largely unknown. Now, for the first time, a research team led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health has linked the function of a core component of cells’ machinery — which cuts and rejoins RNA molecules in a process known as “RNA splicing” — with longevity in the roundworm. The finding sheds light on the biological role of splicing in lifespan and suggests that manipulating specific splicing factors in humans might help promote healthy aging.The study was published in the Dec. 5, 2016 advance online issue of Nature.“What kills neurons in Alzheimer’s is certainly different from what causes cardiovascular disease, but the shared underlying risk factor for these illnesses is really age itself,” said William Mair, assistant professor of genetics and complex diseases at Harvard Chan School and the study’s senior author. “So one of the big questions is: Is there a unifying theme that unfolds molecularly within various organ systems and allows these diseases to take hold?”Due to advances in public health, life expectancy has dramatically increased worldwide over the last century. Although people are generally living longer lives, they are not necessarily living healthier lives, particularly in their last decades. Age-related diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurodegenerative disease are now among the leading global health burdens — a problem that will likely only worsen.Old C. elegans expressing a specific alternative splicing event tagged by either green or red fluorescent protein, well-fed (left) or on dietary restriction (right). Worms on dietary restriction maintain a youthful splicing pattern (as seen in young worms) compared to the well-fed worm population at the same age. Image: Caroline Heintz Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Citizens arrested

first_img Students plant seed funding in plan for renewable electricity Law students help to mend Puerto Rico The power of citizenship was on Carmen Yulín Cruz’s mind last week at Radcliffe, but with a caveat: that power has limits.“Citizenship does not give you equality,” the mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico, said in the keynote address of “Unsettled Citizens,” at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study on March 29. During the daylong conference, which examined shifting and sometimes competing ideas about citizenship in a time of global migration, Cruz made an impassioned plea for a bond beyond legal statehood.“Equality has to be fought for,” she said. “It has to be nurtured. It has to be taken care of every day.”Cruz, who in September 2017 gained national prominence with her criticism of the U.S. government’s response to Hurricane Maria, questioned the nature of citizenship as a political institution, focusing on themes of humanity and belonging. Emphasizing moral over legal imperatives, Cruz called for a “global citizenship” and said, “We should be tearing down walls, not building them.”In explaining her views, Cruz pointed to what she and others saw as the Trump administration’s slow and inadequate response to Maria’s impact on Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory. When the Category 4 hurricane devastated the island, she said, many Puerto Ricans relied on the bonds of citizenship, looking to the federal government for aid. “Don’t worry, Mayor,” they told her. “They will come.”Months later, as concerns over food, water, and electricity persisted, even her most trusting constituents began to lose faith, she said.Counting the casualties from disruptions in healthcare and shelter, Cruz noted a total of 3,000 dead from Maria and its effects. Many of those fatalities could have been avoided with a faster, fuller response, said Cruz, who has blamed President Trump for the toll and repeated the charge in her keynote.“Our lives did not matter to him,” she said. “Being a citizen was not enough.” (For his part, Trump has repeatedly lashed out at Cruz and other regional leaders, including in a series of tweets this week.),The hurricane and its aftermath highlighted an ongoing debate about Puerto Rico’s status, with some favoring statehood while others push for independence. The former argument gained momentum in the wake of Maria, with statehood supporters contending that gaps in recovery aid are related to Puerto Ricans being disenfranchised in national elections.Cruz sees a strong case from “a strictly civil rights” perspective that Puerto Rico’s citizens should be able to vote for president. However, she opposes statehood, instead supporting a compact of free association, which in essence would retain the island’s status as a territory.“I am an American citizen, but I identify myself as Puerto Rican, so my nation is Puerto Rico,” said Cruz , who has announced her intention to run for governor as a member of the Popular Democratic Party. Ultimately, even as she argued for the primacy of ties that transcend citizenship, she also championed citizenship’s ideals, notably the right to self-determination.“If the majority of people want free association, let it be so. If people want independence, let it be so. If people want statehood, let it be so,” she said. “Let it be so, but let us decide.”The day’s first panel explored the ways economics can define political status. K. Sabeel Rahman, president of the public policy organization Demos and an associate professor at Brooklyn Law School, addressed the practical implications of wealth and poverty. U.S. economic policy has been “weaponized,” he said, citing disparities in opportunity that grow out of educational disparities, sorting society into a permanent underclass and a permanent ruling elite.“If you functionally can’t access economic opportunity, if you’re segregated from the center of the city,” he said, “you’re not really a member of the full polity.”Economic citizenship has another meaning for the Alaska Native Regional Corporations. Rosita Kaaháni Worl, president of the Sealaska Heritage Institute and a member of the Tlingit tribe, explained how, seeking full control over their lands, the state’s natives established tribal corporations through the Alaska Native Claims Settlement in 1971. This move transferred the titles of 330 million acres to 13 regional corporations and more than 200 village corporations, at the time the largest lands claim in American history. It also established Alaskan natives as an ethnic group. But corporate citizenship has had unforeseen consequences, Worl said. The requirement that the corporation show a profit has resulted in difficult decisions about the use and development of wild spaces, for example. In addition, tribal membership — and, thus, full membership in the corporations — is defined by blood, with only those able to prove one-quarter Alaskan native blood eligible for full membership. This has created heartbreaking situations in which tribal citizens are seeing their children and grandchildren disenfranchised.The imaginary white ethno-state was the focus of a presentation later in the day. A “territorial reimagining” based on a mythical past, this idea is at the core of alt-right hate groups, explained Alexandra Minna Stern of the University of Michigan. She also noted how the language of white nationalism — “deportation, homelands, and recalling birthright citizenship” — has entered the mainstream political discussion.After additional speakers discussed global migration and the plight of refugees and disenfranchised workers, Daniel Carpenter, faculty director of Radcliffe’s social sciences program and the Allie S. Freed Professor of Government in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, summed up the conference.“Maybe we need a more encompassing vision of citizenship,” he said. “Maybe ‘unsettling’ it is exactly what we need to save it.” Puerto Rico benefits from Harvard’s living lab 29 travel to hurricane-damaged island to provide legal services, rebuild homes Relatedlast_img read more

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Ozias-Akins Honored

first_imgThe University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF) has named Professor Peggy Ozias-Akins a Distinguished Research Professor, a title awarded to UGA faculty recognized internationally for their contributions to knowledge and whose work promises to foster continued creativity in their discipline.In 2015, she was awarded a Creative Research Medal by UGARF and the D.W. Brooks Distinguished Professor Award by the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES)Ozias-Akins, a CAES professor of horticulture, applies advanced biotechnology and molecular biology tools — tools she developed herself in some cases — to improve crops like peanuts.She is an expert on apomixis, the asexual production of seeds in plants. Even though it was studied for decades, there was little to show for these efforts until Ozias-Akins took a pioneering approach and applied a combination of forward genetics, genetic engineering and genomics to the problem. She was among the first to localize apomixis to a chromosomal region. She later found the first plant gene associated with it. Her work lays the foundation to begin research into the systematic application of apomixis in plant breeding, which could have an enormous impact on agriculture in both advanced and developing nations.Working with the federally funded Peanut and Mycotoxin Innovation Lab project based at UGA, Ozias-Akins and her colleagues are seeking genetic markers that indicate resistance to aflatoxin, a cancer-causing chemical produced by molds that grow in soil, decaying vegetation. This could have a global impact on the peanut industry.Ozias-Akins serves as director for the UGA Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics and Genomics.She and other institute faculty create new and improved plant varieties that are higher yielding, more disease resistant, more nutritious or have greater ornamental value.She also co-chairs the Peanut Genome Sequencing Consortium, an extension of the International Peanut Genome Initiative. As an integral member of the initiative, she helped to sequence the commercial peanut, which will jumpstart breeders’ ability to identify genes or areas of genes with particular advantageous traits such as disease resistance or oil chemistry.In her research program, Ozias-Akins studies crops that benefit the economy in Georgia and globally.“The peanut is one of the crops I work on and it’s a fascinating crop. It flowers above ground while it fruits below,” she said. “There are a lot of challenges growing peanuts from both foliar and soilborne pathogens.”In her research program at UGA, Ozias-Akins has helped to create peanut lines that are resistant to fungal contamination and produce fewer allergens. She has also introduced several genes into peanuts, including one that reduces the allergens in peanuts.“Some of the proteins in peanuts can cause severe reactions in humans. We were able to knock down the production and, in some cases, almost eliminate those proteins,” she said. “Unfortunately, no companies want to push a genetically modified peanut because it takes a lot of money and years to get it through the system.”Peanut and other crop yields have increased steadily through plant breeding. “(Breeding methods) really need to change with an expected 9 billion population. Scientists need to be able to use all the tools in our toolbox to keep those yield gains going up,” Ozias-Akins said. “Genomics is one of those tools. Globally, peanuts are an important oilseed crop in China, India and Africa. China is the top producer. In many developing countries, small peanut farmers are often women. It’s very important to improve the crop genetically.”Over her more-than-30-year career at UGA, Ozias-Akins says it has been very rewarding to see classical and molecular breeders come together.“We use molecular tools in our crop breeding programs and we pass this knowledge along by working with students,” she said. “Agriculture students are the scientists of the future and they need to know about both methods — classical and molecular breeding — in order to be successful.”A native of Tifton, Georgia, her interest in science goes as far back as third grade, when she entered a science fair with a project on trees. She went on to win first-place ribbons in numerous science fairs throughout her formative years, including a first-place award for a project on bacteria on plants.Ozias-Akins left south Georgia to earn an undergraduate degrees in biology and botany from Florida State University (FSU) and a doctorate in botany from the University of Florida (UF). She returned to Georgia in 1986 to join the UGA faculty at UGA-Tifton. She credits her mentors, UF scientist Norris Williams and FSU researcher Margaret Menzel, for encouraging her interest in genetics.last_img read more

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Trail Mix – July 2018

first_img 2:33 4:13 If I Were A Carpenter Jonathan Edwards 4:47 Anxious Annie 10 String Symphony Kyrie Eleison Love Canon 3:50 Rough and Ready Heart Blue Yonder Country Tunes and Love Songs Hot Buttered Rum Everybody The Sea The Sea Are You Electrified? Arthur Buck 3:28 3:08 3:37 4:29 3:42 Lonely Without You Carolina Story Audio PlayerArthur BuckAre You Electrified?Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.00:000:00 / 5:11 3:55 Children of Paradise Willie Nile 4:38 Ring The Bells JOHNNYSWIM and Drew Holcomb & the Neighbors Circus Of Life Kinky Friedman Lucky Ones Israel Nash 4:31 5:11 Jonny Todd The Skiffle Players The foundation for Arthur Buck was laid years ago. Brooklyn based singer/songwriter Joseph Arthur was a frequent opener for R.E.M. in the early 2000s, while Peter Buck – long time R.E.M. guitar player –  had regularly played with Arthur in various configurations.In 2017, the pair found themselves together in Mexico and songwriting magic ensued.  Eight songs were written in three days during sessions where, seemingly, there were no expectations and songs developed as they pleased. The end result was the duo’s eponymous debut record, which released in mid-June.Tour dates for Arthur Buck are in the works. In the meantime, check out “Are You Electrified?” right here.Lots of old friends return to this month’s mix. Check out brand new tracks from Israel Nash, Kinky Friedman, 10 String Symphony, Love Canon, The Sea The Sea, Willie Nile, and Hot Buttered Rum.Also check out the new tunes from Band of Heathens, Byron Issacs, Brother Dege, The Skiffle Players, Cliff Westfall, Love Honey, Balloon Ride Fantasy, Clay Parker & Jodi James, Rough & Ready, Peter Holsapple, and Carolina Story.And stay tuned to the Trail Mix blog. We’ll be going on the road with Drew Holcomb, hearing from friends and fans about The Seldom Scene’s long time mandolin player John Duffey, and catching up with up and coming band Oliver The Crow.Normally, I’d be recommending you take this month’s Trail Mix on your next outdoor adventure . . . but it is scorching on the East Coast right now! So maybe grab your favorite beverage, find a shady spot or take an evening stroll, when it’s just a bit cooler, and dig in. Enjoy the tunes and get out there and buy a  few records from these artists. They’d appreciate it. Game Day Peter Holsapple 3:14 Arcadia Balloon Ride Fantasy Country Come to Town Brother Dege Down To The Garden Clay Parker And Jodi James 3:50 Embed Open Door Lovehoney Losing You Byron Isaacs 3:33 3:34 2:03 Copy and paste this code to your site to embed. 3:08 America the Beautiful The Band of Heathens 3:33 2:45 3:26 Ashes of a Day Gone By Oliver the Crow More And More Cliff Westfall last_img read more

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Frye dominates opening night Duel qualifier for IMCA Northern SportMods

first_imgLAS VEGAS, Nev. ­(Nov. 12) – Tyler Frye will start his pursuit of another big payday at Las Vegas Motor Speedway from the pole. Frye ran away with the qualifying feature win Thursday on opening night of the Duel In The Desert. He’ll look to parlay those $500 checkers into a $1,777 victory in Saturday’s Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod main event on the half-mile Dirt Track at LVMS. The top six from Thursday’s 20-lapper advance to the big show. Frye will be joined by Chris McKellar, Kevin Johnson, Robert Elliott, Brylon Holder and Jorddon Braaten.Holder led early on Thursday, finally giving way to Frye on the ninth lap. Showing the same speed that netted him the IMCA national championship this season, Frye opened a half straightaway lead with three laps to go and won by that margin.Feature results ­– 1. Tyler Frye, Belleville, Kan.; 2. Chris McKellar, Bakersfield, Calif.; 3. Kevin Johnson, Bakersfield, Calif.; 4. Robert Elliott, Clinton, Okla.; 5. Brylon Holder, Bakersfield, Calif.; 6. Jorddon Braaten, Central Point, Ore.; 7. Shawn Harker, Nebraska City, Neb.; 8. Fred Ryland, Brentwood, Calif.; 9. Chris Toth, Holtville, Calif.; 10. Brian Cooper, Yuba City, Calif.; 11. Adam Armstrong, Beatrice, Neb.; 12. Nick Spainhoward, Bakersfield, Calif.; 13. Austin Frye, Taft, Calif.; 14. Clay Money, Penokee, Kan.; 15. Anthony Giuliani, Morgan Hill, Calif.; 16. Arie Schouten, Blair, Neb.; 17. Garrett Jernagan, Bakersfield, Calif.; 18. Rick Diaz, Los Banos, Calif.; 19. Tony Konold, Clear Lake, S.D.; 20. Nick Sylvester, Bakersfield, Calif.; 21. Jason Nation, Bakersfield, Calif.; 22. Gary Dutton, Bakersfield, Calif.; 23. Ricky Childress Jr., Bakersfield, Calif.; 24. Ron Tex Jr., Papillion, Neb.last_img read more

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Cricket News Ben Stokes – Innings that didn’t let sun to set in Great Britain

first_imgNew Delhi: Nine days – That’s all we have to cherish. On 4th September, Wednesday, you’ll be unable to write on Ben Stokes as the focus will once again shift to ongoing Ashes series. These nine days are all you have to toast the man behind reincarnation of Test cricket. But what willyou write about? Whatever you write, make sure it’s nothing less than what the gentleman deserves.An innings that unfolded the classic folktales of Ian Botham’s Headingley innings. Innings that took ecstasy from one camp to another. Innings that didn’t let sun to set in Great Britain. England team was bundled out for 67 in the first innings of third Test match and Australians, who were 1-0 up in the five-match Ashes series, asked the World champions to chase 359 on a sluggish track and the way three lions had featured in the Test match – it looked a lost dream until Ben Stokes scripted a stunning turnaround.On the intensely dramatic final day of the Test match, England lost wickets at a regular interval against ‘overly’ confident Australia team who would have retained the Ashes with a win in Leeds.When England’s last batsman, Jack Leach, joined Stokes at the crease they still required an unlikely 73 for victory. However, Stokes farmed the strike expertly with his 10th-wicket partner and struck the ball as sweetly as one could dreamt of, once finding the crowd with an outrageous reverse sweep, and on another occasion stepping outside off stump to scoop Pat Cummins to fine leg for six.Stokes’s effort evoked memories of Ian Botham’s famous Ashes escape act with England at this very venue in 1981 and there will be discussion as to whether the modern-day all-rounder’s efforts are even more impressive.Ben Stokes’ innings against Australia not only derived Australia’s inability to defend 359 in the fourth innings, but has put Test cricket in the best place possible. In the era of T20 cricket, Stokes played a blend of orthodox and unorthodox – while keeping his head still to smash Aussie bowlers out of the park. He kept his emotions under control and dominated the game on his terms.Stokes managed to score his first boundary on the 75th ball he faced but yielded 48 runs from last 24 balls, striking at 200 with ease. The few scares which Josh Hazlewood did in his opening spell of the day had started to look dream with same bowler getting hit for consecutive sixes into the Western Terrace in penultimate pressure situation.What made the innings look even more special was how he kept his partner Leach off strike. En route to eighth Test ton, Stokes made sure to have the strike on nine out of ten occasions which eventually led Leach to finish with just one run in unbeaten 76-run stand. Yes, the innings wasn’t without luck as he was out leg-before to Nathan Lyon when England still needed two runs, but Australia didn’t have a review to challenge Joel Wilson’s on-field call. Stokes was also dropped by Marcus Harris off Pat Cummins’s bowling on 116, and not to forget disastrous run-out miss by Nathan Lyon, coming even before umpiring blooper. However, destiny favors the brave hearts and Ben Stokes genius against Australia certainly deserves it.The winning shot from his willow through the cover region will certainly become the highlight of World Test championship one day. The urn is still alive, very much because of Ben Stokes genius. Will it be termed as greatest Test innings ever? – Well, time will tell us. But we can stamp the authority and say, ‘Not too far off’. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

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Joudrey feels right at home on ice for Badgers

first_imgGrowing up in Nova Scotia in a family that loved hockey, there was never any doubt for Andrew Joudrey that he would play the game. What he might not have known, however, is that after years of hard work, he would wind up playing for the Wisconsin Badgers.Joudrey has been playing hockey as long as he can remember. He first laced up his skates at the age of three, and started playing organized hockey at age five.When winter rolled around in Bedford, Nova Scotia, it was time to bust out the skates and sticks, and even when things thawed out in the summer, there was still a focus on hockey.”There was soccer and baseball in the summer, but it was all just staying in shape for hockey or just something to do until hockey started again,” Joudrey said.There was never a doubt that he would play, especially living with such a hockey-oriented family. His father, Ken, played college hockey at St. Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia and became a real role model to Andrew as a youngster. And when his father wasn’t encouraging hockey, his grandfather was.”[My dad] was always taking us to the rink — him and my mom — but he really loved hockey. He would always be showing us tricks,” Joudrey said. “Plus my grandfather was still in really good shape and he would skate with us all the time.”When my dad was at work he would come get us and bring us to the rink,” Joudrey continued. “We were a really strong family that was really involved in hockey.”Joudrey reminisced about growing up with hockey on Saturday nights in Canada.”It was quite an experience. Every Saturday night was hockey night in Canada on TV, and you’re playing ball hockey all day and coming in and watching at night,” Joudrey said. “It was a way of life at home.”When he wasn’t skating with his family, he was skating with his friends from school, even if they didn’t have access to a rink.”All the time after school we’d go down — a bunch of friends — would go down to the lake down the street,” Joudrey said. “[We’d play] pond hockey, and then, whenever we could get ice, we’d go in and practice.”Joudrey as a BadgerNow in his third year at the UW, Joudrey has developed into one of the most sound players on the team, as well as one of its biggest leaders. The junior was voted by his teammates to wear an “A” on his jersey as assistant captain this season.To the naked eye — or ear — Joudrey may not seem like the clear-cut choice for captain. The usually soft-spoken forward does not come off as a player who gets his teammates riled up in the locker room.But those teammates knew what they were doing when they picked him.”He is a shy, quiet guy, but one of the nicest guys you’ll ever meet. He’s a lead-by-example guy, and the guys see the example he sets both away from the rink and in the locker room,” team captain Adam Burish said. “He’s not a guy that’s going to come in and scream at guys, but just by the way he plays and the way he handles himself, he’s got those leadership qualities.””I’m just trying to be a positive force both on and off the ice,” Joudrey said. “It doesn’t have to be vocal, it’s just being there for guys and being a leader on the ice in how I play.”Senior right-winger Ryan MacMurchy saw Joudrey as a leader even before he came to Wisconsin when the two played together for the Notre Dame Hounds of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League.”He’s a great leader,” MacMurchy said. “He’s always got his stuff together off the ice and he’s a vocal guy in the rink and always a positive guy. He’s definitely someone who’s really matured.”MacMurchy also said Joudrey was the biggest jokester on the team, always busting out one-liners and fun facts.”He’s kind of a quiet guy sometimes but he comes out of his shell when he needs to and he gets the guys going and is a real voice in the locker room,” MacMurchy said.MacMurchy made Joudrey’s transfer to college play just that much easier. The two played together on the same line for the Hounds, and have carried the chemistry fostered there onto the ice for the Badgers, where they have played on a line together for most of the last two years.”We have a great chemistry that we had at Notre Dame and came down here and we’ve been working all the time to keep that chemistry strong and keep building,” Joudrey said. “We have a really good relationship, talking to each other and knowing what each other is going to do.”Perhaps the main concern for Wisconsin after the first two series this season has proved to be goal scoring. The Badgers have scored just nine goals in four games.As a leader and an offensive player — he scored 27 goals and notched 51 assists in 53 games for the Hounds in 2002-03 — Joudrey is dedicated to fixing the scoring woes.”You don’t think it’s much, but just putting a rebound home in a drill can go a long way,” Joudrey said. “It’s really practicing on the ice and getting really focused and coming out and wanting to score. [Head coach Mike Eaves] always talks about willing the puck to you.””I see a little bit more assertiveness by Andrew,” head coach Mike Eaves said. “He’s going to be a real solid player for us. He wants to get the offense going here a little bit, and I’m sure he will.”Part of getting things going with Joudrey and MacMurchy’s line will be finding a consistent third line-mate. Matt Ford started off the season with the two, former Badger Matt Auffrey played on the line at times last year and now freshman Ben Street is getting an opportunity.”I love playing with Jouds, and once we find another guy it’s going to be pretty scary,” MacMurchy said. “I think Street can be that guy, it’s just early for him. He’s just getting his feet wet as a freshman.””We’ll just keep working and we’ll find one,” Joudrey said. “Right now we’re working well with Street and hopefully that keeps going and getting better.”Joudrey continues to turn that hard work as a kid into a steady career with Wisconsin. He had 14 goals and 32 assists in his first two seasons, though he has just one assist so far this year.However, if Street pans out on the line with Joudrey and MacMurchy, look for a spike in Joudrey’s numbers, the Badgers’ scoring and the team’s success.”We have the ability to put up goals like [the Earl line] and other lines around the league,” MacMurchy said. “We’ve got great skills and work really hard. We’ve just got to get really comfortable and have that chemistry with another guy, which we don’t have yet.”last_img read more

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Softball: Wisconsin could use Colorado State Classic as launchpad into Big Ten play

first_imgRight now, everything is clicking for the University of Wisconsin softball team and they will look to continue their success in the Colorado State Classic in Fort Collins this weekend.Wisconsin is riding a six-game winning streak and are winners of eight of their last nine. This bunch of Badgers are doing just about everything right. In a rain-shortened invitational in Houston last week, Wisconsin went 3-0 and totaled 35 runs.Wisconsin will get a good look at the University of Maine Black Bears (1-4) who the Badgers will play three games against on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The Badgers will also square off against the Colorado State University Rams (11-4).With Maine having played a limited schedule so far this season, Wisconsin hasn’t had much to go off of while preparing for the Black Bears. The Black Bears opened their seasons with two losses to Grand Canyon University and Creighton apiece.Men’s hockey: Badgers look to take down Buckeyes in regular season finaleThe University of Wisconsin men’s hockey team will take on No. 15 Ohio State in the final series of regular Read…Maine was able to snag one win against Grand Canyon in a 4-0 victory, but gave up 24 runs over the weekend. The shutout was the only time the Black Bears held a team to less than 5 runs this season.After consecutive games of scoring 14 and 16 runs against Princeton and Sam Houston State University respectively, the Badgers’ bats are just about as hot as they have been all season. What makes Wisconsin’s lineup so dangerous is the fact they are getting production from a number of players.Chloe Miller leads the team with a .473 batting average while Brooke Wyderski has knocked in a team-leading 17 runs. The long ball has also been a friend of the Badgers who have hit 14 on the year with Stephanie Lombardo and Melanie Cross each getting three knocks.Wisconsin will face the Black Bears Friday, Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. CT, 11 a.m. CT and 10 a.m. CT respectively.UW will get yet another chance to test themselves against a Rams team who have come on strong after an opening weekend left the Rams with a record of 2-3. Since then, they have eight of their last nine outscoring their opponents 50-17.The Rams are undefeated at home this season at 5-0, but Wisconsin could take advantage of Colorado State’s inconsistent pitching staff. The Rams’ pitchers have shut out their opponents five times, but have also surrendered at least 5 runs in six different contests.Men’s basektball: Badgers face difficult test in preparation for the big danceAsk Nigel Hayes about the final standings of the Big Ten, and the University of Wisconsin men’s basketball senior forward Read…The key for Wisconsin will be limiting the Rams’ bats that average 4.6 runs a game and have scored at least 6 runs in six games. If there is any rotation that can limit an offense, it is the arms of Kaitlyn Menz and Kirsten Stevens.The two account for all but one of the Badgers’ wins and average a .85 ERA with opposing hitters only batting an average of .209 against the duo.First pitch against the Rams will be Saturday at 1:30 p.m. CT and Sunday at 12:30 p.m. CT.Including this weekend, UW only has six more games before they open up Big Ten play against Northwestern. The Badgers have built their resume in these first two months taking on non-conference opponents with a combined 149-131 record.UW still remains unranked in the USA Today/NFCA Coaches rankings but are starting to get recognition with 11 votes coming in to be ranked this past weekend.last_img read more

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