Tata Deal Registers as ‘Largest Transaction in the Renewables Space in India’

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Vibhuti Agarwal for the Wall Street Journal:India’s Tata Power Co. said it agreed to acquire renewable-energy company Welspun Renewables Energy Pvt. Ltd. in a deal with an enterprise value of 92.49 billion rupees ($1.38 billion).Tata Power Renewable Energy Ltd., the renewables unit of Tata Power, signed an agreement to acquire Welspun Energy’s subsidiary in “the largest transaction in [the] renewables space in India,” Tata Power said in a statement to the stock exchange in Mumbai on Monday.The companies didn’t reveal how much Tata Power Renewable Energy had agreed to pay. Tata Power—the nation’s largest private power-utility company by generation capacity—said the acquisition was being made at an enterprise value of 92.49 billion rupees, subject to closing adjustments. Enterprise value usually comprises the company’s total assets, debt and any cash on its books.Welspun Renewables, part of the Welspun Group, has about 1,140 megawatts of solar and wind power assets across 10 Indian states. Of that, about 990 megawatts is in solar projects and about 150 megawatts is in wind projects.Once the transaction is completed, Tata Power Renewable Energy will own capacity of 2,300 megawatts, “making it the largest renewable power company” in the country.Tata Power Renewable Energy currently operates 294 megawatts of renewable power capacity and about 400 megawatts worth of solar and wind projects that are soon to be completed. Another about 500 megawatts of renewable assets are being carved out of Tata Power into the firm through a court process, the statement said.The company is aiming to double its total generation capacity across thermal, renewable and hydropower to 18,000 megawatts by 2022.Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi wants to ramp up the country’s wind-power capacity to 60 gigawatts by 2022 from nearly 30 gigawatts. The government has also set a target of installing 100 gigawatts of solar power by 2022, an ambitious target, given that the existing solar capacity is 6.9 gigawatts.Full article ($): India’s Tata Power Buys Welspun Renewables Tata Deal Registers as ‘Largest Transaction in the Renewables Space in India’ Madeleine Cuff for Business Green:In related news, late last week the Indian Energy Ministry announced plans to cancel four coal-fired power stations. The decision to cancel the proposed plants – which had a combined capacity of 16GW – was taken following community resistance and weakening demand growth thanks to improvements in energy efficiency. Commenting on the announcement, Tim Buckley, director of energy finance studies at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, said it is a sign of the dramatic shift underway in India’s energy markets. “This is yet another major policy shift underscoring how seriously India is working to transform, modernise and diversify its electricity sector away from coal,” he said.As part of its climate change strategy India plans to cut coal use and boost its power generation from renewables from 12 per cent today to 40 per cent by 2030. To achieve this, Prime Minister Narendra Modi plans to double India’s wind power capacity to 60GW by 2022, and install 100GW of solar power by the same date.Full article: Tata Power aims to fuel India’s renewables revolution with acquisition of Welspun Renewableslast_img read more

Read More →

Op-Ed: Coal Subsidies Harm Texas’ Economy

first_imgOp-Ed: Coal Subsidies Harm Texas’ Economy FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Monitor: “Trump Digs Coal” became one of the most recognizable slogans of the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, and candidate Donald Trump’s promises to scrap the controversial Clean Power Plan (CPP) and bring back coal jobs struck a chord in Midwestern mining states. The vision of an unfettered, resurgent U.S. coal industry resonated with working class voters, helping to tilt the electoral map Trump’s way.The Trump Administration is following through on its promises to scuttle the CPP, withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, and abolish other environmental regulations that are odious to the coal industry. However, the coal industry has continued to struggle against strong economic headwinds, primarily market competition from sustained low (sub-$4/mmBtu) natural gas prices.Wall Street analysts agree that long-term economic forces are working against any federal effort to rehabilitate the U.S. coal industry. They identify the advanced age and inefficiency of many coal-fired power plants; long term regulatory uncertainty that disfavors investment in new coal plants; reduced demand from countries that import U.S. coal; and most importantly, sustained price competition from cheap natural gas as the major economic factors that make a U.S. coal renaissance highly unlikely.In Texas, several utilities have announced plans to deploy more electric power from renewable energy regardless of changes in federal regulations. Luminant has announced plans early this year to close three coal-powered plants — Monticello, Sandow and Big Brown. CPS Energy, in San Antonio, has long planned to mothball the JT Deely coal plant by the end of 2018, and reiterated their decision after President Donald Trump’s executive order in March on the CPP. The Austin City Council voted in 2014 to begin phasing out of the city’s share of the coal-powered Fayette Power Project starting in 2020, with the goal of getting out of the project altogether by 2022.As the longed-for coal recovery has been slow to materialize, policy discussions in Washington, D.C., and in Appalachian coal country have moved beyond loosening environmental controls and into the previously disfavored arena of direct market intervention in the form of taxpayer-funded coal subsidies. Ill-conceived policies, like coal subsidies or taxpayer bailouts for coal plants, would distort the U.S. energy market and interfere with the well-functioning Texas electric market, delaying or derailing the Lone Star State’s market-driven transition to clean energy.Asking taxpayers to bear the burden of propping up a coal industry whose product cannot compete in the U.S. or global open-energy market is a violation of free market principles and a self-defeating economic policy for our state and our country. Texans in Congress, state leaders and fiscal conservatives should reject attempts to manipulate the energy markets to prop up older, uneconomical plants that burn coal at the expense of cleaner, cheaper electricity produced from home grown natural gas, wind and solar power.More: http://www.themonitor.com/opinion/columnists/article_9720da9a-f26a-11e7-960a-23229cefc983.htmllast_img read more

Read More →

Analysts say lower export prices a threat to Illinois Basin coal producers

first_imgAnalysts say lower export prices a threat to Illinois Basin coal producers FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):A combination of increased production, declining domestic demand and lower seaborne pricing is creating conditions in the Illinois Basin that might force mine closures or consolidation. Two analysts said the basin is already oversupplied, while others are hesitant to use that label yet.Several coal miners in the region announced increased output guidance or additional production during fourth-quarter 2018 earnings calls, which spurred some concern among observers who worry there will be more tonnage and fewer places for producers to sell it.Peabody President and CEO Glenn Kellow said on a Feb. 6 earnings call that the company will scale back some operations because pricing in the Illinois Basin is “not at a level that provides a clear return of that cost of capital.”John Hanou, president of Hanou Energy Consulting, agreed that the basin is oversupplied and there could be some consolidation as a result. “Coal miners are their own worst enemy,” Hanou said. “If they can expand production at a relatively low cost, that’s what they do.”Seaport Global Securities LLC analysts Mark Levin and Nathan Martin wrote in a March 20 report that while they think it is early to say the basin could be oversupplied in 2020, “we believe investors should at least be thinking about the possibility.” If lower export prices persist, that could make it “very challenging for Illinois Basin exports to maintain their lofty levels.”While the basin performed well in 2018 and looks poised to do pretty well this year, its success will depend largely on exports, Hanou said. Illinois Basin producers can compete when API2 prices are around $70 to $75, but once the price drops below $70, it becomes more difficult, even for the lower-cost miners. The price has recently fallen below $70. “Historically, if you look at the Illinois Basin and the exports, they’re highly cyclical,” Hanou said. “If the exports really drop this year and more likely next year, that’s going to create more supply into the domestic market.”More ($): As export prices fall, observers worry about coal oversupply in Illinois Basinlast_img read more

Read More →

China moves forward with 16GW renewable energy project in Qinghai province

first_imgChina moves forward with 16GW renewable energy project in Qinghai province FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享PV Magazine:The state-owned Huanghe Hydropower Development Co, Ltd. has named the nine solar panel manufacturers which will supply the 3,182 MW of PV generation capacity in the first phase of a mammoth, 16 GW renewable energy project which is set to include 10 GW of new solar.Work has already started on the 64km² first phase of the project and is set to be completed by October. Trina Solar will lead the list of PV suppliers for the first stage by shipping 600 MW of its panels, according to Huanghe Hydropower chairman Xie Xiaoping, who presented details at the recent China Photovoltaic Industry Association (CPIA) annual conference in Shenzhen.The sprawling generation project, when finished, is set to feature 5 GW of wind power capacity – 2 GW of which is due to be installed in the current phase of development – and 1 GW of concentrating solar power. Until last year, official news about the project stated a hydropower element but that has now been removed. The project will also feature energy storage, said Xie.The renewables facility is one of two double-digit-gigawatt scale projects being planned by the State Power Investment Corporation Limited-owned Huanghe Hydropower in Qinghai province. The 16 GW facility is being constructed in Hainan prefecture.Xie told the CPIA gathering the ambitious scheme was given the go-ahead by Chinese president Xi Jinping when he visited Qinghai in August.[Vincent Shaw]More: Cutting edge module tech promised on first, 3 GW slice of 10 GW Chinese solar installationlast_img read more

Read More →

LS Power unit looking to build 1,000MW wind farm in Idaho

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Times-News:A massive wind farm, Idaho’s largest, could break ground in the Magic Valley in 2022. The final size and cost for the Lava Ridge Wind Project isn’t yet known, but the wind farm could be up to 1,000 megawatts with a price tag in the $1 billion range. At 1,000 MW and with hundreds of turbines, the wind farm wouldn’t just be Idaho’s largest, it would be among the biggest in the world.Magic Valley Energy will own Lava Ridge. The company is an affiliate of LS Power, an energy generation and transmission company with projects throughout the U.S. This will be LS Power’s first Idaho wind farm.The wind farm will be on a vast area of Bureau of Land Management land in parts of Jerome, Lincoln and Minidoka counties, mostly south of Idaho Highway 24. Shoshone and Dietrich are the only cities that will be relatively close to the project. The sheer amount of land, and the proximity of that land to major transmission lines, made this an attractive site for a wind farm, said Magic Valley Energy Project Manager, Luke Papez.Most of the land that makes up the wind farm site is used for grazing and recreation. Papez said Lava Ridge will not disrupt those land uses.Most of the region’s wind projects have been on the smaller side, with the exception of the 60-turbine, 138 MW Cold Springs wind project — currently the state’s largest according to the USGS — between Bliss and Mountain Home.Papez said that the land in Jerome, Lincoln and Minidoka counties might not have been able to support a viable wind project just a few years ago. But the wind industry has changed a lot in recent years. “Given the advancements in wind turbine technology and greater efficiency in turbines we’re able to look at sites such as this,” Papez said.[Colin Tiernan]More: Idaho’s largest wind farm planned near Shoshone LS Power unit looking to build 1,000MW wind farm in Idaholast_img read more

Read More →

12 Stunning Photos of the Linville Gorge

first_img [divider]More from BlueRidgeOutdoors.com[/divider] Photo by Justin Costner Photo by Justin Costner Photo by Justin Costner Photo by Steve Yocom Photo by Steve Yocom Named for 17th century explorer William Linville, who is said to have been related to Daniel Boone and suffered a scalping at the hands of local Native Americans, the Linville Gorge Wilderness is one of the most incredible natural features in the East. This scenic wonder lies deep in the heart of Western North Carolina where its 2,000 foot valley is carved by the powerful whitewater of the Linville River. Because words can’t adequately describe the gorge’s glory, we sought the assistance of a few local gorge rats who know there way around an SLR. Click to enlarge the photos in the gallery below. Special thanks to —Justin Costner of Hike More Adventures, Steve Yocom of Steve Yocom Photograhy, and Serge Skiba of Earth Captured Photographycenter_img Photo by Serge Skiba Photo by Justin Costner Photo by Steve Yocom Photo by Serge Skiba Photo by Steve Yocom Photo by Serge Skiba Photo by Serge Skibalast_img read more

Read More →

Full Suspensions and Fly Rods: Bikefishing in the Blue Ridge

first_imgThe Pisgah National Forest sprawls across some 500,000 acres of Western North Carolina woods and waters, and it’s especially renowned for two activities: mountain biking and fly fishing. The singletrack that criss crosses this temperate rainforest beckons mountain bikers from all over the country, and some from beyond its borders, and its trout streams have long been etched in the annals of America’s fly fishing folklore. So in my mind, it stood to reason that a multi-day adventure combining the two pursuits would be nothing short of pure Pisgah gold.When my budding idea for a “bikefishing” excursion that would incorporate both Pisgah’s famed trout streams and its world-renowned single track began to take shape, I was told there was one person that I needed to talk to. Enter fly fishing guide and guru Aaron Motley of Hunter Banks Fly Fishing in Asheville and Waynesville, N.C.A Clemson, S.C. native and an exceptional mountain biker, Motley was one of the first members of the now highly-accomplished Brevard College Mountain Biking Team. He routinely uses his hardtail to gain access to wilder and more remote stretches of water that would otherwise require miles of arduous hiking. When we began plotting our adventure, he immediately recommended Pisgah’s South Mills River.Thanks to some helpful consultation with Steve Yocom, the photographer who would eventually join us on the trip, and Blue Ridge Outdoors Digital Publisher/walking Pisgah map Dusty Allison, the South Mills was already on my short list of go-to bikefishing destinations. But Aaron’s exuberance and his encyclopedic knowledge of the South Mills drainage—helped along by a few photos of sizable wild trout he’d netted on a previous trip to the area—completely sealed the deal.The South MillsThe South Mills River area encompasses approximately 17,120 acres of the Pisgah National Forest— 8,629 of which are considered roadless acres.It is bordered by the spine of the Blue Ridge Mountains on its northern end and the South Mills drainage basin to the south, while the congressionally-designated Cradle of Forestry forms its western boundary.Once a part of railroad heir George Vanderbilt’s expansive private forest, which shared a name with his now world famous Asheville estate, this portion of Pisgah played a pivotal role in the early forest management and conservation legacy of the United States.In the late 1800s, Vanderbilt hired a young forester named Gifford Pinchot to manage the vast and growing woodland holdings on his enormous Biltmore Estate. Though Pinchot would only serve a brief tenure at Biltmore before taking a job in Washington, D.C. as the first chief of Teddy Roosevelt’s newly established United States Forest Service, his time there laid the groundwork for the nation’s first forestry school. The remnants of this school, which was deconstructed and moved to the nearby Cradle of Forestry in the 1970s, can still be seen along the banks of Cantrell Creek in the South Mills area. In 1988, the state of North Carolina awarded the South Mills an Outstanding Resource Waters designation, and by 1990 Congress had listed it as a National Wild and Scenic Study River. In ‘96, the USFS followed suit, determining that several sections of the river are indeed worthy of full-on Wild and Scenic classification. If that level of protection ever comes to fruition, the South Mills will become North Carolina’s longest wild river.The AdventureOn the morning of the trip, I met Aaron at an Ingles parking lot in the speed trap town of Mills River, N.C. to procure essential provisions: trail mix, local craft beer, and vacuum-sealed salmon.Then our talk turned to the weather. Rain, it seemed, was all but certain in the forecast. Such conditions come with the territory in the section of Pisgah we were headed for, which routinely receives as much as ninety inches of annual rainfall. The forecast did little to dampen our excitement.We secured our bikes—full suspension Specialized outfits provided by Motion Makers Bicycle Shop in Asheville—and began our caravan toward the South Mills River Recreation Area.We arrived at the trailhead at the Wolf Ford Gauging Station just off of Forest Service Road 476, and we began loading our bikes with camping equipment and fly fishing gear.When fishing the South Mills, Aaron relied heavily on a traditional Japanese fishing method known as tenkara. First popularized in the United States by Daniel Galhardo, who founded Tenkara USA and is an avid bikefisher in his own right, the tenkara style is tailor made for the trout streams of Southern Appalachia. It puts the focus on simplicity by taking the reel completely out of the fly fishing equation and allows for easier casting on tight-quartered, rhodo-choked streams.Once the tenkara rods were securely strapped to Aaron’s pack, we hit the trail and begin following the course of the clear-flowing, rhododendron cloaked South Mills.“Biking is the only way I go back in here,” Aaron tells me as we negotiate typical Pisgah singletrack, complete with rock ledges and downed logs. “It’s the perfect combination of two of my favorite adventures, and it affords me access to spots that other anglers seldom take the time to reach.”About three miles in, we arrived at a suspension bridge where the South Mills River Trail meets Squirrel Gap. It looked like a tantalizing place to wet a line, but our attention was diverted by the late arrival of our cohort, BRO digital publisher Dusty Allison. From the other side of the bridge, Dusty was wheeling up with a riding partner he found somewhere along the way.As fate would have it, that riding partner turned out to be the bass player for the Infamous Stringdusters, Travis Book. Unlike the rest of his bandmates, who call the state of Colorado home, Travis lives in the nearby town of Brevard, North Carolina, and aside from being a heralded musician, he’s known around those parts as one hell of a mountain biker.We chatted for awhile with Travis, who had just come off a road stint and a show at Red Rocks with Ryan Adams. Then he pointed his bike in the direction of Squirrel Gap and took off on what Strava would later tell me was a thirty-plus mile ride. Slightly star-struck, we pedaled onward in the opposite direction, where dog-hobble undergrowth, multiple river crossings and—we hoped—copious wild trout would await.Read on![nextpage title=”Read on!”]Finding Copperas RockAfter a strenuous six-mile ride made even more difficult by heavy packs and a healthy dose of skin-shredding doghobble, we finally arrive at our intended destination— Copperas Rock.This imposing rock feature soared high above the west side side of the South Mills to the tune of some seventy feet while a plentiful population of wild trout danced in the gin-clear pools below.Dusty was the first of our group to wet a line. Like Aaron, he’s a devotee of the trustee tenkara method, but since his rod had been compromised by an overhanging limb during the grueling ride in, Aaron set him up with his 12-foot IWANA rod from Tenkara USA, complete with the deadly combination of a size 12 Parachute Adams and Frenchie nymph dropper.Within a matter of minutes, Dusty had hooked the first wild Brown Trout of the trip. The trout, which sported colors more vibrant than those I’d seen on more familiar delayed harvest haunts, was ultimately enticed by the Frenchie, attacking it with a type of aggression unique to brown trout living in remote, wild places. Dusty’s fish set the tone for another 24 hours of stellar fly fishing, top notch mountain biking, and priceless camaraderie in one of North Carolina’s finest national forests.Looking to organize a bikefishing excursion of your own? Consider one or more of these ideal destinations. VirginiaWhitetop Laurel Creek (accessed VIA the Virginia Creeper Trail)If you’re looking for a more moderate bikefishing adventure, you’d be hard pressed to find a better destination than Whitetop Laurel Creek via the Virginia Creeper Trail. Stretching for 34 miles through the heart of Southwest Virginia, just outside the Appalachian Trail town of Damascus, the Virginia Creeper Trail has long been famous among bikers, but it also offers quick and easy access to Whitetop Laurel, one of Virginia’s best trout streams.West VirginiaNew River GorgeThe New River Gorge National River is home to some of the best fly fishing East of the Rockies, and the trail systems found along its banks offer unrivaled opportunity for bike-in angling. Try the Glade Creek Trail, which provides streamside access to 5.6 miles of the popular Glade Creek trout stream. For more info visit nps.gov/neriNorth CarolinaGreat Smoky Mountains National Park (North Carolina side)Typically, mountain biking is not an option within the boundaries of a national park, but the Deep Creek area on the North Carolina side of Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a rare exception. Both Deep Creek and Indian Creek are accessible by way of moderate, stream-side trails where mountain biking is permitted. Set up a base camp at the Deep Creek Camping Area and enjoy these two pristine Smoky Mountain streams in conjunction with a mellow mountain biking journey. For more info visit greatsmokies.com/deepcreekNorth Mills River AreaLike its South Mills counterpart, the North Mills River Recreation Area of Pisgah National Forest offers ample bikefishing opportunities. Set up a base camp at the Mills River campground before setting off to explore the North Mills and its multiple tributaries such as Big Creek, Middle Fork, Fletcher Creek, and Spencer Branch.GeorgiaMountaintown CreekAccording to Andrew Gates of the Mulberry Gap Mountain Bike Getaway in Ellijay, there are few trails in the area that combine biking and fishing better than the Mountaintown Creek Trail. “Mountaintown Creek trail is a must do for fly fishing as well as biking,” Gates says. “It is one of the most remote and beautiful trails in our area, and it has a thriving population of native trout.”last_img read more

Read More →

Fridays on the Fly: Wes Hodges’ Proper Etiquette For Fishing With Guides

first_imgIntro by Justin Forrest, words by Wes HodgesFishing with a guide in new waters is one of the best ways to learn about an area, catch some fish, and make new friends.Guiding is one of the noblest professions in the world if you ask me. It takes years of dedication to the craft, the water, and the fish. That’s why people turn to a guide when they’re looking to catch fish in a new place. They teach you what to use, where to use it, how to use it, and when to use it. You’re getting years of experience crammed into your brain during a half day of fishing. It’s worth every penny.That being said, there are a couple things folks need to realize when they are looking to hire a guide. Sure, you’re paying them for a service, but that doesn’t make them your employee. Whenever I fish with a guide, I shut up, listen, and do what they say. Nine times out of ten, I’m catching fish and having a damn good time doing it. I’ve fished with guides in the Florida Keys for Permit, in Boca Grande for Tarpon, and in WNC for trout. Whether you’re fishing in a mountain stream, a wide inlet, or a coastal flat, it’s all the same.To get a professional opinion on the subject, I reached out to Wes Hodges, owner of Wesley Hodges Fly Fishing in Blacksburg, Va. He’s been fly fishing most of his life and knows a thing or two about guiding. Wes was kind enough to share his must-dos, must-don’ts, and his biggest pet peeves as a professional fishing guide.Wesley Hodges Fly FishingPhoto: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingRule Number One:  Never Be LateMy trips are almost always catered to a specific day and time of year, but also to the client’s needs. For instance, in the middle of summer, when the fish activity is at its peak early and late, I could start a trip at 6 a.m., 7 a.m., or even 1 p.m.  It all depends on the water, the hatches, and the fish. Nothing is constant in nature and my trip start times are dictated by that. If a client shows up late, we could miss the very time in which the fishing activity is at its peak.“I can’t control the fishing but I can damn sure control lunch!”Also, a guide should never be late for his trip.  That is never, ever good.  When that does happen, don’t make excuses.  Be a man and own up to your mistake. That is my number one pet peeve.  And yes, I have been late for a trip.Wesley Hodges Fly FishingPhoto: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingRule Number Two: Never Expect To Catch FishExpect to have a badass time and a good lunch. I have had clients that assumed their booking of a fishing trip would automatically result in world-class fishing as if I was Poseidon. Common statements and questions include:“How many fish should we catch today?”“I just want to catch a smallmouth over 22 inches!”“I caught over a hundred fish in Tenn. Should I expect that in Va.?”That is simply not the case. There are so many factors that go into a successful day of fishing. You have to account for the wind (especially in fly-fishing due to the casting), water flows on tailwater rivers, and sometimes the fish just don’t freaking eat.“Nothing good ever comes from an overly aggressive fly-cast.”I understand that clients get all amped up to fish because I know how I am when I get a day on the water.  I can’t blame them, but the clients need to remember that we are guides, not gods.  When I am faced with a client that expects those outcomes I simply reply with, “I can’t control the fishing but I can damn sure control lunch!”Wesley Hodges Fly FishingPhoto: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingRule Number Three:  Slow DownThis is very important for the client to understand. It does not directly impact me, but I want my clients to have the most enjoyable experience on the water. That experience needs to start with slowing down their life for that day, slowing down their mental state, and slowing down their cast. Nothing good ever comes from an overly aggressive fly-cast.One of my best trips was with the head honcho of a construction company. He desperately wanted to catch something larger than a Brook Trout, so I took him to a stream that holds large, wild Brown Trout. This man has worked so hard, for so long, that he worked every ounce of relaxation out of his soul. He put his waders on and set up his rod quickly. Hell, he even drank his scalding hot coffee in one large gulp.“Do I need to tie you up to that sycamore tree again?”In an effort to make this “bird dog” gentleman controllable, I calmly walked him down the stream and asked him to rest against a large tree sitting along the shoreline. I gave him clear directions, “Watch that run against the far bank, right below the fast water. When I get back from the truck, let me know how many trout you saw rise.”Photo: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingI came back in 20 minutes and the man was asleep, knocked out cold, resting against the large sycamore tree. I let him sleep for about another 20 minutes as I finished my coffee and tied our flies on. I asked him how many trout he saw rise and he replied, “Only one.”We caught that fish and many more wild browns on that trip. We didn’t share one word about his profession for the remainder of the day. We only talked about the important stuff in life; family, bird dogs, fine shotguns, streamers, and morel mushrooms. I still guide this man multiple times each year.  Whenever he is getting uncontrollable I will calmly say, “Do I need to tie you up to that sycamore tree again?”Wes Hodges is the owner of Wesley Hodges Fly Fishing in Blacksburg, Va. He guides fly fishing trips down the New River, on private water, and to remote destinations like Montana and Maine. Follow him on Instagram to keep up with his travels.Justin Forrest is an outdoor writer, fly fishing addict, and co-founder of Narrative North—based in Asheville, N.C. He posts pictures of cats and fishing on Instagram sometimes.last_img read more

Read More →

REI Celebrates Women: All About Outessafest

first_imgREI hosts two new festivals on the East Coast celebrating women and the outdoors through live music, speakers, recreation, and more.Taking place in Washington D.C. and Shakori Hills, North Carolina, these special one-day events consist of star-studded musical lineups, activities, and classes focused on connecting women with the outdoors. While the events are focused on the awesomeness of women, all are invited to partake in the festivities. Today REI announced the official lineups for the two events.Washington D.C.The D.C. event will be held on Saturday, September 29, in Patuxent River Park at Jug Bay. Best Coast is headlining along with performances by Brazilian Girls, Seratones, Lucy Dacus, Oshun, Bat Fangs, Palehound, and Bibi McGill. Unique to this event, go paddling on the Jug Bay with REI’s DC Outdoor School. There is no camping available at this event.Shakori HillsLocated at the Shakori Hills Community Arts Center in North Carolina, the event takes place on Saturday, Oct. 20. Headlining the show are Mavis Staples and Best Coast, with additional performances by Seratones, Bat Fangs, Mary Lambert, Bibi McGill, H.C. McEntire, and S.E. Ward. There will be limited camping available for attendees as well.Both festivals open at 10 a.m. with each event hosting local vendors, food trucks, and alcohol sold at select tents.Outdoor Activities and ClassesAttendees can participate in yoga sessions, rock climbing, paddling, a 5K run, and Firestarter Sessions. These sessions include classes on camp cooking, urban outdoor essentials, wilderness survival, iPhone Photography, and more. Paddling and rock climbing activities will be lead by female instructors from the REI Outdoor School in addition to classes led by brand partners.Partners include Black Diamond, Garmin, Hydro Flask, Leatherman, Lorissa’s Kitchen, Maui Jim, Merrell, OluKai, Osprey, RXBAR, Salomon, Sea to Summit, Smartwool, and Subaru of America.Along with their set schedule of activities and classes, there will be surprise events to discover throughout the day. After finishing your 5k or rock climbing session, they will have a hammock zone for relaxing.Attendees will have to fill out a waiver before participating in any outdoor activities.About REI’s Force of NatureAnnounced in 2017, Force of Nature is a program focused on creating more access to the outdoors for women. Through hosting 1,000s of classes and experiences nationwide, they are looking to make the outdoors a level playing field.According to a study by REI, “More than 85% of all women surveyed believe the outdoors positively affects mental health, physical health, happiness and overall well-being, and 70% reported that being outdoors is liberating.”For tickets and more information, check out the Outessafest website. Children 12 and under will be admitted free of charge.last_img read more

Read More →

Trail Mix – July 2018

first_img 2:33 4:13 If I Were A Carpenter Jonathan Edwards 4:47 Anxious Annie 10 String Symphony Kyrie Eleison Love Canon 3:50 Rough and Ready Heart Blue Yonder Country Tunes and Love Songs Hot Buttered Rum Everybody The Sea The Sea Are You Electrified? Arthur Buck 3:28 3:08 3:37 4:29 3:42 Lonely Without You Carolina Story Audio PlayerArthur BuckAre You Electrified?Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.00:000:00 / 5:11 3:55 Children of Paradise Willie Nile 4:38 Ring The Bells JOHNNYSWIM and Drew Holcomb & the Neighbors Circus Of Life Kinky Friedman Lucky Ones Israel Nash 4:31 5:11 Jonny Todd The Skiffle Players The foundation for Arthur Buck was laid years ago. Brooklyn based singer/songwriter Joseph Arthur was a frequent opener for R.E.M. in the early 2000s, while Peter Buck – long time R.E.M. guitar player –  had regularly played with Arthur in various configurations.In 2017, the pair found themselves together in Mexico and songwriting magic ensued.  Eight songs were written in three days during sessions where, seemingly, there were no expectations and songs developed as they pleased. The end result was the duo’s eponymous debut record, which released in mid-June.Tour dates for Arthur Buck are in the works. In the meantime, check out “Are You Electrified?” right here.Lots of old friends return to this month’s mix. Check out brand new tracks from Israel Nash, Kinky Friedman, 10 String Symphony, Love Canon, The Sea The Sea, Willie Nile, and Hot Buttered Rum.Also check out the new tunes from Band of Heathens, Byron Issacs, Brother Dege, The Skiffle Players, Cliff Westfall, Love Honey, Balloon Ride Fantasy, Clay Parker & Jodi James, Rough & Ready, Peter Holsapple, and Carolina Story.And stay tuned to the Trail Mix blog. We’ll be going on the road with Drew Holcomb, hearing from friends and fans about The Seldom Scene’s long time mandolin player John Duffey, and catching up with up and coming band Oliver The Crow.Normally, I’d be recommending you take this month’s Trail Mix on your next outdoor adventure . . . but it is scorching on the East Coast right now! So maybe grab your favorite beverage, find a shady spot or take an evening stroll, when it’s just a bit cooler, and dig in. Enjoy the tunes and get out there and buy a  few records from these artists. They’d appreciate it. Game Day Peter Holsapple 3:14 Arcadia Balloon Ride Fantasy Country Come to Town Brother Dege Down To The Garden Clay Parker And Jodi James 3:50 Embed Open Door Lovehoney Losing You Byron Isaacs 3:33 3:34 2:03 Copy and paste this code to your site to embed. 3:08 America the Beautiful The Band of Heathens 3:33 2:45 3:26 Ashes of a Day Gone By Oliver the Crow More And More Cliff Westfall last_img read more

Read More →