Duncan Hall hosts golf tournament

first_imgAfter weeks of preparation, Duncan Hall will host its first campus-wide golf tournament, The Duncan Classic, the weekend of April 13th and 14th. The nine-hole competition will include separate chipping and putting challenges. Sophomore Michael O’Brien, a Duncan Hall resident, said he saw the potential for an individual golf tournament for the Notre Dame community when coming up with a plan. “Josh Whelan started a new tradition in Duncan Hall, the Duncan blazer, and I loved the idea,” he said. “Duncan was in need of a new dorm event, and I was inspired by Josh’s idea and our location by the Notre Dame Golf Course.” O’Brien said he decided to combine the two ideas and the Duncan Classic was born. “This tournament is a way to spread the Duncan tradition with those who participate in and win the Duncan Classic,” he said.   The tournament will include separate men’s and women’s brackets, O’Brien said. Any students and faculty from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross may participate, but to keep the competition fair and to encourage more participation by amateur golfers, Division I golfers may not compete. The dorm also hopes to make the event more accessible by providing participants with necessary equipment. “Duncan Hall will provide all participants with a set of clubs, if needed, free of charge,” he said.   Those who participate will play on Saturday, and those who make the cut will compete in the next round on Championship Sunday where they will play in pairs instead of as a group of four. “You can sign up with your friends, but you are not guaranteed your Saturday foursome until all have officially registered on the Google form,” he said. The costs for participating will vary according to the event of choice. O’Brien said $10 will cover the cost of the nine-hole game. Competing in either the putting or chipping challenge will cost three dollars, and participating in both will cost a total of five dollars. Individuals who would like to do all three events can participate at a fee of $15. The preliminary men’s round will start from the white tees, while the women will start from the red tees, he said. On Championship Sunday, the men who advance will begin at the blue tees. All United States Golf Association (USGA) rules will apply throughout the competition, O’Brien said. “Tee times are available from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. all day Saturday, and you can see which tee times are available on an embedded link on the Google doc,” O’Brien said. “The best way to find the document and register is to search ‘Duncan Classic’ on Facebook, but you can also check the Week at ND email for the link.” O’Brien said the scoring system in place is individual stroke play, meaning the total number of shots taken on each hole will compose the final score. “Golf is a gentleman’s sport so we trust participants to record their scores individually and accurately,” he said. “However, there will be a large Duncan staff presence on the course. Any cheating will not be tolerated.” The competition will conclude with a green jacket ceremony, supplemented with refreshments in the Duncan courtyard. First, second and third place finishers for both the men’s and women’s teams will receive a gift card, O’Brien said. Awards will also be given to the top finishers in the putting, chipping, longest drive and closest pin challenges, O’Brien said. The man and woman who win the nine-hole tournament will each receive a blazer with the Duncan crest. “In future years it [the blazer] will have the Duncan Classic crest on it,” O’Brien said. Duncan will also award a plaque at the conclusion of the Classic which will go to each male and female winner’s dorm, department or college where it can be displayed until the start of the next Duncan Classic. “In a way, the plaque will immortalize the winner and their respective dorm, department, or college,” he said.   In the future, commissioners of the Duncan Classic hope to make the competition an annual event held on the first football bye weekend of the fall semester, beginning next fall, he said. “We want this tournament to be the Bookstore Basketball of golf,” O’Brien said. “The goal for this year was to get the tournament up and running, but in future years we hope to partner with the Bald and the Beautiful or another charity.” Contact Carolyn Hutyra at [email protected]last_img read more

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Judicial Council hosts election debate

first_imgThe candidates for student body president and vice president squared off in a debate Monday night ahead of Wednesday’s elections. The debate, which took place in the LaFortune Student Center basement, was organized by the Judicial Council’s Election Committee.After an opening statement, the three tickets — junior Olivia LaMagna and sophomore Rohan Andresen, freshmen George McCabe and Sean Campbell, and juniors Lauren Vidal and Matt Devine — each answered five questions from the Election Committee.Andresen, who currently serves as Siegfried Hall’s Senator, described several of his and LaMagna’s initiatives, including opening classes in certain departments to students who are not majors and instituting a student advocate during Student Activities Office planning.Devine, who served as director of the Gender Issues Department last year, described his and Vidal’s platform as “personalizing the Notre Dame experience,” using existing structures to institute new policies and to continue those that work.“Our platform stems from looking at what the individual student experience is, looking at the clubs and organizations and how student government can facilitate that and expanding it into the world too,” Devine said. Tori Roeck | The Observer Candidates for student body president and vice president debate Monday in anticipation of Wednesday’s elections.LaMagna, who is currently the junior class president, said she and Andresen would improve student government by working to be accessible and instituting some reforms, including changing the transition procedures for student government positions.“We want to make sure that kids are poised so that they can succeed from the second they get into office and finish out their term and be able to plan all the way through the semester,” LaMagna said.Vidal, who served as student union parliamentarian last year, said she and Devine would improve student government through “policy and programming,” including incorporating medical amnesty into Du Lac. Devine said he and Vidal also plan to increase transparency within student government.LaMagna said she and Andresen would improve student-community relations by increasing awareness of downtown events and businesses and working with other student organizations such as The Bridge Project.“There’s an extremely culturally rich community that’s so close to our campus, and by interacting with them in a more regular and normal way, I think that everybody can have a better Notre Dame experience,” LaMagna said.Devine said he and Vidal would increase interaction with the community by bringing farmer’s markets and other businesses to “quad markets” on campus. Vidal said they would also increase service opportunities, including creating a “29 for 29” program in which each dorm would “adopt” a local underprivileged family.“There are hundreds of families who are both in and out of the Center for the Homeless specifically who would really love help from students like us, as simple as getting a Christmas tree and decorating it, getting donations and presents and making them a meal,” Vidal said.LaMagna said she and Andresen would continue the current sexual assault prevention initiatives by focusing on prevention, including creating a mid-semester presentation for freshmen and naming male-female co-chairs on the Gender Issues Department.“Gender issues and sexual assault is not a one-way discussion,” LaMagna said. “Is shouldn’t be weighed by women who think that it’s their issue or men who think that it’s their thing to fight. We need to make sure the conversation is two-sided. We want to make sure that everybody feels like it is theie issue because it’s everyone’s issue.”Devine, citing his experience in the Gender Issues department and the Committee for Sexual Assault Prevention, said he and Vidal would continue the current administration’s programs, working with the University and students to raise awareness.“We really love the grassroots effort that [student body president] Alex [Coccia] has made with the prayer services, which is an initiative of the student government, but also the bystander training. We think that’s essential when talking about these things.”Also on the ballot were McCabe and Campbell, whose platform consisted of making class registration more complicated, creating a study abroad program in Zahm House for Saint. Mary’s students, asking Belmont Beverages to accept flex point, and making Wrangler Jeans the athletic apparel sponsor. Each of their initiatives was met with cheers from Zahm House residents.“Obviously we’re more concerned about our own needs than your needs, so let’s just get that out of the way,” McCabe, who wore an Easter Bunny costume to the debate, said.Kathryn Peruski, the Judicial Council’s Vice President of Elections, said she was pleased with the student turnout.“There were a lot of people there, which is always nice that people came out. … I was really impressed,” Peruski said. “The candidates obviously had great answers for what we were looking for, and I’m hoping that the students who came to listen got a lot of information from them. It was also publicity for the election, which is the ultimate goal, to get people to come vote.”Freshman Olivia Till said the debate showed her next year’s student government would be in good hands.“I thought that it was pretty obvious which candidates were here to be serious and which were here to be comic relief,” Till said. “I really appreciated the people that took a lot of time on their platform, and I think that we’re really lucky that we have student leaders that have such a clear vision for what they want to do on campus.”last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s completes greenhouse reconstruction

first_imgWith the addition of a new and improved greenhouse facility, complete with state-of-the-art environmental control systems, the Saint Mary’s Science Hall now provides further opportunities for students to research and learn, assistant professor of biology Cassie Majetic said.“[It] has a new airflow system, heating and cooling, a curtain system … vents that pop open and closed … and all of it’s automated,” Majetic said. “You can actually go into a computer program and set the parameters that you want, and the greenhouse will automatically do those things to control the environment within.”Christina Russo | The Observer To maintain climate stability, the greenhouse has to account for external changes in weather that could impact internal conditions, director of facilities Benjamin Bowman said.“There is a weather station mounted above the greenhouse to track outside conditions and control the way the greenhouse reacts based on the humidity and temperature outside,” Bowman said. “The greenhouse controls can notify via telephone message any conditions outside of the predetermined set points.”Majetic said she can manually adjust the settings and run the greenhouse directly from her office, using a computer program connected to the controls.In addition to the updated environmental system, the new greenhouse has larger facilities, including partitioned climate zones.“The new space has … rolling benches so that we can accommodate more plant material and now we have three separate zones in the greenhouse, so that you can carry out multiple experiments under different environmental conditions,” Majetic said.Additional plans for the space include adding grow lights at a later date, Bowman said.Majetic said updates to the facility, which was originally built in 1956, were highly necessary because the old air conditioner “had not worked since the ’90s.”With no temperature control, the biology department could not use the old greenhouse during the winter. Bowman said the Grounds Department utilized the old facility to prepare plant life to be placed around campus.Majetic said the old greenhouse had a highly inefficient layout and no drains in the floors, which made it very difficult for the senior biology majors to conduct their experiments. The entire previous structure had to be torn down to make way for the new one.“The biggest challenge [was] identifying and reacting to unforeseen conditions,” Bowman said. “We had to make changes to the sanitary sewer that left the new greenhouse because the existing sewer was not located where indicated on the existing drawings.”The Science Steering Committee began the conceptual design for the new greenhouse in December 2012 and completed construction documents in February 2014, Bowman said.In May 2014, a press release about the College’s “Faith Always, Action Now” fundraising campaign announced renovations to the Science Hall. Updating to a new greenhouse was the first of many projects to come for the Science Hall, with greenhouse construction beginning in May 2014 and ending by August.To document the construction process over the summer, the College set up live camera overlooking the site. Throughout its construction, students, staff and faculty could access the feed to monitor the progress of the new greenhouse, Bowman said.Faculty and student interest in the greenhouse is peaking as it grows closer to opening for use.“I’m hoping, now that I have more space, to actually use [the greenhouse] to conduct experiments with classes,” Majetic said.“I feel it will provide a better learning environment for our biology students,” Bowman said.Tags: Greenhouse, Saint Mary’s Science Halllast_img read more

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Lecture explores environmental effects of WWI

first_imgDr. Tait Keller, assistant professor and director of environmental studies and sciences program at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee, presented a lecture at the Snite Museum of Art on Wednesday. Keller presented information on the wide-spread and long-lasting environmental effects caused by World War I as part of the Nanovic Institute’s Lecture Series on World War I.“Nature is both omnipresent and invisible,” Keller said, in regards to the mindset of those involved the War. “But I think that only by taking the environment into account can we really understand this war and how this conflict shaped the most basic levels of human existence.”Keller stated that although the integrity of the soil in the pastures along the western front suffered during its constant shelling, the soil recovered quickly. He also noted the obliterated deciduous trees in affected pine forests were replaced.During the war, European belligerents’ consumed much of the cattle in sub-Saharan Africa transformed grazing land into overgrown bush lands, which are hospitable environments for the tsetse fly, Keller said. The swelling tsetse fly population was a catalyst for “sleeping sickness” which killed droves of equatorial African natives.Keller also noted how European cattle seizures forced poor Africans to eat more simian meat. The increased contact between chimpanzee blood and humans could have been a component in the outbreak of an early strain of HIV.“The War had also increased blood transfusions, which together with aggressive vaccination campaigns in the colonies, mingles peoples’ blood and perhaps had accelerated the virus’ evolution,” Keller said.Food mobilization was also crucial to the European war efforts, according to Keller. Vigorous campaigns in the United States, such as artificially inflating the price of wheat, promoted crop production during the time period.“Optimistic farmers borrowed heavily, usually through second mortgages to expand cultivation on marginal lands,” he said. “Farmers also employed the one way disk, which could quickly break the soil and uproot weeds … but would leave a layer of loose sediment which years later would invite wind erosion.”Keller stated how the erosion of farmland soil, especially in the Great Plains region, likely precipitated the Dust Bowl. The Dust Bowl devastated farmers who were already economically unstable due to their investment in growing artificially priced crops during the War.Keller also pointed out how, during the War, American control of booming sugar farms in Cuba resulted in Cuban resentment of America, which would have serious historical implications.“[With an ecological perspective] on the War, we find that subjugated environments often meant marginalized people, alienated from their land,” Keller said. “Perhaps this is the Great War’s global legacy.”The Nanovic Institute’s lecture series will continue through December 12th, at the Snite Museum of Art. The series will be featuring lectures from professors from Notre Dame, University of Birmingham, the United Kingdom and Georgetown University.Tags: Dr. Tait Keller, environment, environmental effects of war, Nanovic Institute, Nanovic Institute for European Studies, nanovic lecture series, Rhodes College, Tait Keller, the Great War, world war I, WWI, WWI and the environmentlast_img read more

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Campus ministry explores needs

first_imgThe Office of Campus Ministry is taking initiative to keep up with the evolving spiritual needs of the Notre Dame community.“The Spirituality Study is Campus Ministry’s way of intentionally engaging the Notre Dame community, to get to know our students for who they are, and consider ways in which we might support them in their faith, in their life and respond to whatever their needs may be,” senior and Hall Retreat intern Laura Gauthier said.Campus Ministry associate director of communications Kate Morgan said the study seeks to better understand the practices and programs of the Notre Dame community in order to cultivate a better practice of everyday spirituality on campus.“We hope the information collected in this study will help us to recognize what our students need from us and how we can better support them during their time at Notre Dame,” Morgan said. “We’re also very interested in hearing what’s currently working in Campus Ministry and what’s not.”Morgan said she and the rest of Campus Ministry acknowledge that the study will not facilitate progress on its own.“While we know this study won’t give us all the answers, we do think that learning more about student life will allow us to help students grow in their faith,” Morgan said.Sophomore and Junior Retreat intern, senior Jordan Russell, said she is excited for an opportunity to examine and critique the current programs Campus Ministry offers.“We want to help students grow in their faith in whatever ways they need,” Russell said. “Therefore, our hope is to uncover what those needs are in order to better aid the current and incoming students. I think this is a great chance for us to really ask the question, ‘who are our students?’” Russell said.Morgan said the study is an opportunity to help better understand students and carry on the mission of Campus Ministry.“I think it’s imperative for Campus Ministry to understand student interests, concerns, aversions,” Morgan said. “Knowing this will help us to assess our own programming and determine how we can better tailor it to meet their needs”Though the study may engender major changes within Campus Ministry in the future, the study also serves the present University community, Gauthier said.“Campus Ministry strives to serve its students as Christ would serve them, recognizing that every student on this campus is not only important, but beautiful,” Gauthier said. “This has been, and will continue to be, our goal. By engaging the unique stories that make up individual lives on this campus, we are excited to continue getting to know our students, loving our students and letting Christ show us the way to serve them best.”Tags: Campus Ministry, Spirituality Studylast_img read more

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NDVotes ’16 provides forum for political discourse between students

first_imgThursday night in Geddes Hall, NDVotes ’16, a student task force aimed at increasing political engagement, hosted an open mic night. The goal of the forum, according to NDVotes member and event moderator Nikki Steiner, was to allow students to express their views on the upcoming election and the political process.“We wanted to hear what the students care about on campus and what they wanted to see from candidates in the upcoming 2016 election,” Steiner said. “We wanted to give them a voice and hear what they care about.”Lucas Masin-Moyer | The Observer Freshman Prathm Juneja opened the discussion by bringing up issues of voter apathy and lack of voter education.“It really concerns me that we have students who are unaware and uninvolved,” he said. “Students will automatically align themselves with a political party without knowing anything about politics.”Task force co-chair sophomore Roge Karma echoed Juneja’s views and said voter participation is essential to the political process. (Editor’s note: Roge Karma is a viewpoint columnist for The Observer.)“It is almost a responsibility to be politically aware and politically involved,” he said.Karma said youth are not “inherently apathetic.”“When there is a candidate that inspires people, the youth come out to vote,” he said.Sophomore Ariana Zlioba said when young people are involved, they can have an impact in the political process.“If you look back in history, from the revolutions in the 1800s up until Vietnam, the people leading discussions and the people asking the hardest questions were always young people.”  Zlioba said. “They were people who were idealistic and passionate enough to incite change when no one else wanted to.”Juneja said student apathy toward political participation is closely tied to the education system. “Not once was I told how to vote,” Juneja said. “[Nor was I told] about news sources, or about the views of the political parties.”Sophomore Cassi Hayes said apathy stems from a larger disillusionment with the political process.  “Money and big corporations and lobby groups seem to run so much of [our political process],” she said. “[One] of the reason young people aren’t fighting for a better system is because they feel they don’t have power.”Zlioba said politicians’ attitudes towards compromise often make agreement across the aisle impossible.  “The problem is that politicians are associating their unwillingness to compromise on principles with unwillingness to compromise on issues,” she said. This polarization is not as prevalent in American homes as one might believe, freshman Abby Ferguson said. “People are more moderate than they think they are,” Ferguson said. “Politicians are becoming more polarized.”An explanation for this phenomenon was offered by Hayes, who said politics doesn’t reward people for being moderate.“This mentality encourages a system [that] doesn’t necessarily reflect the views of the American people,” she said. Tags: NDVotes, voter registration, Voter turnoutlast_img read more

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Graduate students present research in competition

first_imgNotre Dame graduate students from the Colleges of Arts and Letters, Engineering and Science will present their research in the final round of Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) on Wednesday night in the Jordan Auditorium in a competition to win $1,000. Evan Bryson, communications specialist for the graduate school and publicity coordinator for 3MT Notre Dame, said the competition provided graduate students with a unique opportunity. “It’s this opportunity for graduate students, in a competitive space, to describe the fantastic research they’re doing here,” Bryson said. “I feel like this is a quality contest because I don’t think graduate students really have a public forum at Notre Dame to describe the work that they do, especially with each other and with undergrads and with people from the community. We’re framing it as a celebration of their research.”3MT originated at the University of Queensland in Australia as an academic competition for Ph.D. students. It has since spread to more than 35 research universities in the United States, including many of Notre Dame’s peers, according to Bryson. Competitors in the finals have been preparing since mid-January. “It was pretty strict this year, with what was regulating entries,” Bryson said. “You had to have passed your candidacy exams, you had to be well in your way in a Ph.D.; you couldn’t be a master’s student. You had to be dissertating or, at least, working towards a dissertation. Really, this was just a gate for people who were deep in their research and had something to share.” Nine Ph.D. students — three from each of the colleges — will be presenting in the finals, selected from over 30 presenters in the preliminary rounds.“I sat in on all of them and it was really fun,” Bryson said. “Part of this experience is getting graduate students to be able to talk about their research in a way that isn’t specific to other researchers, that isn’t just a conversation they’re having with their lab, but is something you or I could understand, that anyone coming into the competition would want to hear about because it’s set up in such a way that’s jargon-free and that’s general enough for a non-specialized audience and is also captivating.”South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, South Bend Brew Werks co-founder and owner Drew Elegante, Trustee of the South Bend Community School Corporation Maritza Robles and Dean of the Graduate School Laura Carlson are the judges who will choose the first- and second-place winners; attendees will vote for the third-place winner. Lou Nanni, Notre Dame vice president of university relations, will be the master of ceremonies.The first-place winner will represent the University at a conference in April.“This really is just promoting really fascinating research that’s happening on campus that I think anyone would be interested in hearing about,” Bryson said. “The people who are presenting are fascinating individuals with diverse backgrounds. They’re intense scholars and it’s mesmerizing to listen to people who are experts.” Tags: academic research, graduate school, three-minute thesislast_img read more

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Visiting professor connects ethics and environment

first_imgSaint Mary’s hosted Willis Jenkins, associate professor of religion, ethics and environment from the University of Virginia, to present on current environmental concerns. The lecture, titled “After ‘Laudato si’’: Revisiting the Ecological Legacy of Thomas Aquinas,” focused on the relation between Thomas Aquinas’ theology on creation and salvation and Pope Francis’ second encyclical, “Laudato si’: On Care for Our Common Home.”Jenkins said in his talk he is approaching the topic as a non-Catholic.“I have long been a reader of Thomas, but I’m not a specialist,” Jenkins said. “I work primarily on religious dimensions of environmental ethics where indeed I’ve written about Thomas Aquinas in contemporary and environmental thought.”His goal of the lecture was to see how “Laudato si’” and Aquinas to work together to establish how humans should be living in society in order to better sustain the earth.“My point here is really not, especially a non-Catholic, to attempt to criticize St. Thomas or the current pope, but rather to sharpen the potential of something that they share which is a moral anthropology that is quite different from the prevailing way of being human in our society,” he said.“Laudato si’” calls for humans to live authentically. Jenkins defines this as resisting norms of exclusion and exploitation.“The contemporary views of humanity represented by encyclical tradition rooted as they are in medieval Christian theology area actually culpable for the environmental destruction,” he said. “I want to trace this idea of dominion from Thomas through the modern encyclicals in order to then consider how ‘Laudato si’’ tends to receive and transform that tradition.”Jenkins says environmentalists claim that Aquinas’ theology on creation is in line with the Catholic exploitation of dominion.“For many contemporary environmental thinkers, Thomas Aquinas represents exactly the traits responsible for an ecological crisis which is anthropocentrism and dominion,” he said.According to Jenkins, Aquinas wholly supports preserving both the dignity of humans and the dignity of other earthly creatures.“Creatures can’t be used in any what way,” Jenkins said. “Whatever kind of uses there are, they have to take place in this broader ecology of virtues.”According to Aquinas, humans could not know God without creatures because each creature reveals a certain perfection of God.“In so far as human dignity is realized through ecological relations, it is vulnerable to those relations and it is vulnerable to political violence,” he said. “Thomas would say humans need experiential knowledge of creatures to know God it might mean they have a right to have a right to have access to meaningful biodiversity.”However, Jenkins pointed out that past encyclicals have used the anthropocentric point of view that humans have ultimate domino over creatures.“The encyclicals are using dominion to establish universality of human dignity and that helps explain why members of this tradition do not get along well with politics that seem to privilege the humanity of some over others,” he said.Establishing human dignity in this way is dangerous, according to Jenkins, because it seems to show how separate humans are from their world.“By the light of some environmental criticism it appears that a consequence in this way of establishing human dignity is a view of human persons as utterly separate of their world,” he said. “That’s actually worse than anthropocentrism. It’s cultivating a moral anthropology in which humans experience themselves as radically different from other creatures.”Jenkins said that according to Pope John Paul II, we need equality in the dominion as well.“If everyone has an equal share in dominion, and earth really is for everyone, then it’s a violation of human dignity if lifestyle of the affluent exposes the vulnerable to great harm,” he said.People can avoid this inequality by living authentically as the encyclical suggests, Jenkins said.“Authentic humanity is in learning to use the world rightly, which entails refusing to regard it as an object to be used,” he said. “Environmental injustice is a central point to the encyclical and I think that in itself secures its status as groundbreaking. It establishes that the Church and humanity must generally hear the cry of the poor in climate change.”Tags: Aquinas, encyclical, environment, laudato si’last_img read more

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Chautauqua County Officials Report Nine New COVID-19 Cases Over The Weekend

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN ImageMAYVILLE – Chautauqua County health officials reported nine new positive COVID-19 cases stemming from Saturday to Monday.Of the nine new cases, one is a person under the age of 18-years-old, a young woman (age not specified), one man and one woman in their 20’s, a man and woman in their 40’s, two woman in their 60’s, and a woman in her 90’s.This brings the total number of confirmed cases to 240.Out of those, 15 are active, 102 people are under mandatory quarantine or isolation orders by the Public Health director, 216 recoveries, zero hospitalizations, and nine fatalities. There are now 1,021 people under domestic traveler quarantine for having arrived to Chautauqua County from a state listed on the New York State travel advisory.last_img read more

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Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton to Have World Premiere at the Public

first_imgTony winner Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton will have its world premiere as part of the Public Theater’s 2014-15 season. Helmed by his Tony-nominated In The Heights director Thomas Kail, the new musical features Miranda playing Alexander Hamilton, one of the founding fathers and the first Secretary of the Treasury. The production will begin performances on January 20, 2015 and run through February 22.Inspired by the book Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow, Hamilton features a cast of historical figures that includes George Washington, Aaron Burr, James Madison and Thomas Jefferson.Miranda is the Tony and Grammy winning composer/lyricist of Broadway’s In the Heights. He is also the co-composer and co-lyricist of Broadway’s Bring it On: The Musical. His TV and film credits include The Electric Company, Sesame Street, The Sopranos, House, Modern Family, Do No Harm, Smash, How I Met Your Mother, The Sex and the City Movie, The Odd Life of Timothy Green and 200 Cartas.Click below for Miranda’s performance of a song from Hamilton at the White House in 2009. Lin-Manuel Miranda Show Closed This production ended its run on May 3, 2015 Related Shows Star Files View Comments Hamilton (Off-Broadway)last_img read more

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