‘Turkeys from Heaven’ is Saturday; volunteers needed to deliver

first_img Although it is not necessary to sign up to deliver meals, it is greatly appreciated. Sign up on the   TurkeysfromHeaven-Troy Facebook page and fill out the volunteer form or call Sanders at 372-4576, Janet Rawls at 372-0559 or Taylor Jinright at 268-1051.Those who would like to assist with cooking turkeys or running a grill, may contact Charles Rawls at [email protected] or 372-1907.Sanders said non-refrigerated desserts are also needed and appreciated. The desserts may be delivered to Cattleman Park between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Saturday. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration ‘Turkeys from Heaven’ is Saturday; volunteers needed to deliver You Might Like In many cities and hamlets across the USA, the ol’ Tom Turkey is most often associated with Thanksgiving. But, around Pike County, Turkeys from Heaven are first and foremost in the minds of many around Christmas time.For the sixth year, Turkeys from Heaven will reach out to families that are less fortunate or, perhaps, unable to prepare a meal for themselves.In 2014, Kelly Sanders organized the Turkeys from Heaven program in Troy. The number of turkey meals delivered has grown from 200 to 500. And, this year, the location for the preparation and distribution of the Christmastime meals has moved to Cattleman Park. Latest Stories Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By The Penny Hoarder Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Book Nook to reopen Sanders said Cattleman Park is ideal as a central location for the smoking of the turkeys, the assemble of the meals and as a point for delivery.On Sunday, Turkeys from Heaven volunteers will meet at Cattleman Park on Highway 231 to smoke turkeys, make green bean casseroles, pack rolls, cranberry sauce and desserts and deliver 500 Christmas meals throughout Pike County and into Crenshaw and Bullock counties. Sanders said Turkeys from Heaven has been blessed by the giving sprit of so many. Published 8:08 pm Tuesday, December 17, 2019 Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… TRMC names Smith new CEO The new CEO at Troy Regional Medical Center brings more than 35 years of progressive health care experience to the… read more Sponsored Content “People have been so generous in the purchase of turkeys that we are close on the number needed and also on the ingredients for the casseroles,” Sanders said. “We are so thankful that those needs are being met.“The real need now is for volunteers on Sunday but I have faith that we will have the volunteers we need to assemble the casseroles and pack the meals on Sunday morning and make the deliveries in the afternoon.”The casseroles will be assembled on Sunday morning at Cattleman Park and the delivery of the meals will begin at 1 p.m. There will be an on-site morning worship services for volunteers.“Our hope is that families will come after church and deliver Turkeys from Heaven meals together,” Sanders said. “Those who deliver the meals always say they are blessed to have the opportunity to share Christmas in this special way.” Email the author By Jaine Treadwell Print Article Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Mystery of the missing molecules

first_imgIn a famous parable, three blind men encounter an elephant for the first time. Each touches a part —the trunk, ear, side — and concludes the creature is a thick snake, a fan, or a wall. This elephant, said Kang-Kuen Ni, is like the quantum world. But scientists understand that they can only explore one tiny bit of this vast, unknown creature at a time. Now, Ni has revealed a few more to explore.It started last December, when she and her team constructed a new apparatus capable of achieving the lowest-temperature chemical reactions of any currently available technology, and then broke and formed the coldest bonds in the history of molecular coupling. An unforeseen benefit was that the ultracold temperatures slowed the reaction so much that researchers caught the first real-time glimpse of what happens during a chemical transformation. Though reactions were considered too fast to measure, Ni managed to determine the lifetime of that one — and solve the mystery of the missing molecules in the process.With ultracold chemistry, Ni, the Morris Kahn Associate Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and of Physics, and her team cooled two potassium-rubidium molecules to just above absolute zero and found the “intermediate,” the space where reactants transform into products, lived for about 360 nanoseconds (almost a million times longer than they live in higher-temperature reactions). “It’s not the reactant. It’s not the product. It’s something in between,” Ni said. Watching that transformation, like touching the side of an elephant, can tell her researchers something new about how molecules, the foundation of everything, work.But they didn’t just watch.“This thing lives so long that now we can actually mess around with it … with light,” said Yu Liu, a grad student in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and first author on the study published in Nature Physics. “Typical complexes, like those in a room-temperature reaction, you wouldn’t be able to do much with because they dissociate into products so quickly.”Like “Star Trek” tractor beams, lasers can trap and manipulate molecules. In ultracold physics, this is the go-to method for capturing and controlling atoms, observing them in their quantum ground state, or forcing them to react. But when scientists moved from manipulating atoms to messing with molecules, something strange happened: Molecules started to disappear from view.“They prepared these molecules, hoping to realize many of the applications that they promise — building quantum computers, for example — but instead what they see is loss,” Liu said.Alkali atoms, like the potassium and rubidium Ni and her team study, are easy to cool down in the ultracold realm. In 1997, scientists won a Nobel Prize in physics for cooling and trapping alkali atoms in laser light. But molecules are wonkier than atoms: They aren’t just a spherical thing sitting there, said Liu. They can rotate and vibrate. When trapped together in the laser light, the gas molecules bumped against each other as expected, but some simply disappeared.Scientists speculated that the molecular loss resulted from reactions — two molecules bumped together and, instead of heading off in different directions, they transformed into something new. But how?“What we found in this paper answers that question,” Liu said. Turns out it’s the light’s fault.When Liu and Ni used lasers to manipulate that intermediate complex — the middle of their chemical reaction — they discovered the light forced the molecules off their typical reaction path and into a new one. A pair of molecules, stuck together as an intermediate complex, can get “photo-excited” instead of following their traditional path, Liu said. Alkali molecules are particularly susceptible because of how long they live in their intermediate complex.“Basically, if you want to eliminate loss, you’ve got to turn off the light,” Liu said. “You’ve got to find another way to trap these things.” Magnets, for example, or electric fields can trap molecules, too. “But these are all technically demanding,” said Liu. Light is just simpler. Next, Ni wants to see where these complexes go when they disappear. Certain wavelengths of light (like the infrared the team used to excite their potassium-rubidium molecules) can create different reaction paths — but no one knows which wavelengths send molecules into which new formations.They also plan to explore what the complex looks like at various stages of transformation. “To probe its structure, we can vary the frequency of the light and see how the degree of excitation varies,” Liu said. “From there, we can figure out where the energy levels of this thing are, which informs on its quantum mechanical construct.”“We hope this will serve as a model system,” Ni said, an example for how researchers can explore other low-temperature reactions that don’t involve potassium and rubidium.“This reaction is, like many other chemical reactions, sort of a universe in its own,” said Liu. With each new observation, the team reveals a tiny part of the giant quantum elephant. Since there are an infinite number of chemical reactions in the known universe, there are still many, many pieces to explore.Funding support for the project came from the Department of Energy, David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Dutch Research Council (NWO), and the National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, and the Alexander von Humboldt Found Catching lightning in a bottle Related Tiny tweezers In a first, optical tweezers give Harvard scientists the control to capture ultracold molecules Researchers in an ultracold environment get a first look at exactly what happens during a chemical reaction last_img read more

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