Main radio station on Anjouan island allowed to resume evening news programme

first_imgNews February 7, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Main radio station on Anjouan island allowed to resume evening news programme Receive email alerts to go further Radio Dzialandzé Mutsamudu (RDM) was told it could resume broadcasting its nightly news programme on 29 January, station coordinator Said Ali Bacar said. Since that date, listeners on Anjouan island have been able to tune in to the 9 p.m. news show, “which is mainly about international events,” Bacar said. The programme was suspended on 12 January on the interior ministry’s orders.—————————–28.01.2005 – Authorities suspend news programme of Anjouan island’s main radio stationReporters Without Borders today urged the authorities on the autonomous island of Anjouan to allow its main radio station, Radio Dzialandzé Mutsamudu (RDM), to resume its daily news programme, which were suspended at the orders of the Anjouan interior and information ministry on 13 January “until further notice.””This decision was unexpected, especially as the news programme was mainly about international news,” the press freedom organisation said.”Suspending this programme means cutting the island off from the rest of the world and undermining diversity in news reporting, which is essential in a democracy,” Reporters Without Borders continued. “We call on interior and information minister Djanffar Salim to let it resume normal programming as soon as possible, for the public’s sake.”The suspension stemmed from a recent strike by the island’s doctors. After health minister Fadhula Said Ali gave his view of the strike on the state-owned Radio Télévision Anjouan (RTA), the doctors wanted to respond but RTA refused, so they turned to RDM, which allowed them to present their side of the dispute on the air.As a result, the interior and information minister summoned RDM coordinator Said Ali Dacar Mgazi and an RDM journalist to a meeting with RTA executives at the start of January to seek an explanation.Shortly thereafter, on 13 January, the minister issued his suspension order, accusing RDM of producing “programmes that do not conform with its statutes and internal regulations.”When RDM was founded as a community radio in 1992, it focussed on culture, but there is no law preventing it from broadcasting news programme. Its 9 p.m. news programme, presented by Tex Mohamed, covered only international news, especially developments in the Middle-East. Partnered with Radio France Internationale (RFI), the radio station is based in Mutsamudu, the capital of Anjouan, which unilaterally declared its independence in 1997. Mutsamudu is the second largest town in what is now the Union of Comoros. Anjouan’s few news media struggle to survive with little funding and despite the strict controls imposed by the island’s authorities. Help by sharing this information June 29, 2020 Find out more Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives Follow the news on Comoros RSF_en Newscenter_img ComorosAfrica The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa November 27, 2020 Find out more News Nearly half of UN member countries have obstructed coronavirus coverage ComorosAfrica Reports Organisation June 15, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Read More →

Lady Bulldogs Tennis Team Participates At Shelbyville Invitational

first_imgThe Batesville Varsity Tennis team finished in third place out of eight teams in the Shelbyville Invitational on Saturday.Baylee Rohlfing and Corinne Stone teamed up to win the #2 doubles championship. Audrey Weigel was 2-1 on the day while being the runner up at #3 singles. Rachael Rose at #2 singles and the #1 Doubles team of Julia Hunter & Anna Kick were third place in their brackets, going 2-1 on the day and winning the backdraw. At #1 won singles, Alana Pinckley played two tough opponents very closely but came up just short. Sophie Brown subbed in for Pinckley in the last round and picked up her first varsity win of her career with a win at #1 singles.Batesville plays at Rushville on Monday at 5:00.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Mike McKinney.last_img read more

Read More →

Angels manager Mike Scioscia on the verge of passing mentor Tommy Lasorda

first_img Clippers, Mavericks brace for the unknown in Game 4 Slumping Shohei Ohtani sits as Andrelton Simmons returns to Angels lineup TORONTO — For 13 years as a catcher with the Dodgers, Mike Scioscia shared a dugout with venerable manager Tommy Lasorda. In all of that time, Scioscia said he never imagined becoming a manager, let alone the milestone he’s about to reach.“When I was playing,” Scioscia said, “I was so consumed with playing that you don’t think about what the next step is.”The next step is passing Lasorda.As the Angels open a series against the Toronto Blue Jays on Tuesday, Scioscia has 1,596 regular-season victories as the Angels manager. Lasorda won 1,599 games with the Dodgers. Scioscia certainly could not have envisioned this when he was hired to manage the Angels in November 1999, during the Bill Clinton administration. Today, the Angels have prospects who weren’t even born then.Scioscia has managed the Angels for 19 years. No other big league manager has had his current job longer than the 12 seasons Bruce Bochy has led the San Francisco Giants. Kansas City’s Ned Yost is third, in his ninth season.Both Bochy (24 seasons) and Buck Showalter (20) have managed more years than Scioscia, but with different teams.Holding one job for so long is virtually unheard of today. Only San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich, who has held his position since 1996, can top Scioscia among coaches or managers in the four major sports. Even Bill Belichick got his current coaching job with the New England Patriots a few months after the Angels hired Scioscia.Scioscia’s job security has certainly been helped by the fact that owner Arte Moreno gave him a guaranteed 10-year contract in January 2009, after they had won a World Series and four division titles in his first nine years.That contract expires at the end of this season. Although there has been no word of an extension, there’s also no indication from Scioscia, Moreno or General Manager Billy Eppler that either side is looking to end the relationship.While some Angels fans have been critical of Scioscia during a drought that has seen them miss the playoffs in seven of the previous eight years, those around him believe he still does a good job.Mike Scioscia, seen giving a fist bump to Angels starting pitcher Andrew Heaney, right, is within four victories of surpassing mentor and former Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda in career managerial wins. (Photo by Paul Rodriguez, Contributing Photographer)“It’s something to celebrate,” said Houston Astros manager A.J. Hinch, who is in his sixth season with a second team. “In today’s era, as soon as one thing goes wrong there seems to be a calling for the head of the manager. He’s been able to stand the test of time, to be good at it, to have different style teams, different general managers. That’s a challenge in itself and a testimony to how well-rounded he obviously is and how successful he’s been. I have a lot of respect for him.”Ian Kinsler, who has played for four managers in his 13 years, said he appreciates what Scioscia brings to the table.“Experience is something you can’t really replace,” the Angels’ second baseman said. “He’s seen a lot of games, been part of pressure games, World Series games, playoff games. For me, a manager with a tremendous amount of experience is always somebody that you try to pay attention to.”Scioscia was no doubt paying close attention to Lasorda, the only manager he had during a playing career that went from 1980 to 1992, so it’s no surprise there are similarities.Angels third base coach Dino Ebel was a manager in the Dodgers’ farm system late in Lasorda’s time as the big league manager. He worked more closely with Lasorda when he left the dugout to work in the front office. Ebel then joined the Angels as Triple-A manager in 2005 and was added to Scioscia’s major league staff in 2006.“I’m lucky to have the chance to work with, for me, two Hall of Fame managers,” Ebel said. “A great baseball mind with Tommy, and a great baseball mind with Mike. He doesn’t forget anything, and Tommy never forgot anything.”Much of what Scioscia does is pulled from the Dodgers’ organizational philosophies under Lasorda, most notably encouraging aggressive baserunning.The strongest links, however, go beyond in-game strategies.“It’s the way he handles a clubhouse,” said Angels first base coach Alfredo Griffin, who played with Scioscia under Lasorda and has coached with Scioscia throughout his entire tenure with the Angels. “He makes everybody come together. That, for me, is the way to manage a group of men for a long time. That’s what Tommy did and that’s what Mike does. … You have to have a group come together and work together and feel like they are a family.”Lasorda agreed that managing the clubhouse is the most important job, beyond knowing when to use a pinch-hitter or change pitchers.“A good manager is someone the players have respect for and who will allow them to have a free hand,” Lasorda said. “That’s the combination you need. You need happy players.”The manager also has to set the tone for the clubhouse, starting with a confidence and drive to win every game. Scioscia said those were two of Lasorda’s biggest strengths, and not just in the dugout.Related Articles Lasorda also said he never thought of Scioscia, the player, becoming a manager, but once he did, he knew he’d be a good one.“I was worried about him beating me out,” Lasorda said by phone on Monday. “It took a better man than me. He is great. I am happy for him. He is one of the greatest managers and greatest players that God ever put on this earth. I’m so proud of him.”Sign up for Home Turf and get 3 exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.Scioscia, 59, bristles at any talk about his personal record. He is quick to say “these aren’t my wins,” acknowledging they are a product of work by the players, the coaches and the front office.He also said he still doesn’t feel he’s in the class with Lasorda, who won two World Series in his 21 years leading the Dodgers and has been inducted into the Hall of Fame.“Just knowing what Tommy did for the Dodgers, what my role is here, you can’t compare,” Scioscia said. “What Tommy did for the Dodgers’ organization is special. I certainly don’t put myself in that boat, but having the opportunity to be here as long as I have is something I do not take for granted.” Mike Trout, with bat and glove, helps Angels end losing streak center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Andrelton Simmons accepts Angels’ plan to come back gradually from ankle injury “I’ve seen him in his younger days, in Vero Beach, playing one-on-one basketball games against guys that were way better than him, and he was going as hard as he could because he wanted to win,” Scioscia said. “Every ballgame he was in, every pitch, there was never any feeling of being intimidated by another team. You always felt you were going to play well and win every day.”Lasorda, however, had a lighter side that Scioscia doesn’t, according to Griffin: “Tommy jokes around. Mike doesn’t do that. He jokes around, but not the way Tommy used to. Not even close.”Scioscia said he still talks to Lasorda occasionally, and his former manager still has suggestions for him.“He supported me incredibly as a player,” Scioscia said. “I know he wants us to do well, but he’s very quick to point out, not as well as the Dodgers. He’s made that very clear.”UP NEXTAngels (Garrett Richards, 4-2, 3.47) at Blue Jays (J.A. Happ, 5-3, 4.15), Tuesday, 4 p.m., Fox Sports West, KLAA (830 AM)J.P. Hoornstra contributed to this story. Dylan Bundy scuffles as Angels lose to Giants last_img read more

Read More →

VAR only for ‘clear and obvious’ mistakes says top rules chief

first_img– ‘Not helping’ –Meanwhile Sheffield United manager Chris Wilder was annoyed after VAR denied his side a goal against champions Manchester City — the fifth time it has happened to the Blades this season.“Yet again we had another goal disallowed by VAR,” he said.“That’s about eight or nine over the weekend, this is not a situation helping the game.”Even City manager Pep Guardiola, whose side won 2-0, said VAR was “a big mess”, with the former Barcelona and Bayern Munich boss adding: “Hopefully next season it can do better.”But the introduction of VAR into Scottish football cannot come quickly enough for Glasgow giants Rangers.Sunday saw Steven Gerrard’s side win 2-1 away to arch-rivals and reigning champions Celtic as they moved to within two points of the Scottish Premiership leaders.Gers boss Gerrard’s lone criticism of referee Kevin Clancy centred on the official not sending off Celtic defender Christopher Jullien in added time in an incident that saw Rangers striker Alfredo Morelos see red for a second yellow card.Rangers managing director Stewart Robertson, while insisting he was not criticising referees, said Monday the pace of the modern game made it “extremely difficult to make split-second calls with the degree of certainty required”.He added: “We believe the introduction of VAR would help referees enormously and reduce the number of wrong decisions which sometimes have a dramatic effect on the outcome of matches.”Share on: WhatsApp London, United Kingdom | AFP | The Video Assistant Referee (VAR) should only overturn on-field decisions when there has been a “clear and obvious” error, according to one of football’s leading international rules officials.VAR has proved highly controversial since it was introduced into the Premier League this season.A particular source of concern has revolved around offside calls.Last weekend saw Norwich, Brighton, Sheffield United, Wolves, Brighton and Crystal Palace all have goals disallowed by marginal VAR rulings amid doubts over whether the available technology is accurate enough to make such fractional calls.Players and managers have also questioned whether the system should not be used to reverse an on-field decision that appears correct to the naked eye, a view that received support on Monday from the general secretary of the International Football Association Board (IFAB) — the sport’s ultimate rule-making body.Lukas Brud, while not addressing specific incidents in English football, said IFAB guidance advises VAR should only be used to correct clear errors also applied to offside.“Clear and obvious still remains — it’s an important principle,” Brud said in comments reported by the British media.“There should not be a lot of time spent to find something marginal.“If you spend minutes trying to identify whether it is offside or not, then it’s not clear and obvious and the original decision should stand,” he added.Wolves captain Conor Coady was frustrated when his side were denied what seemed a legitimate equaliser just before half-time against runaway league leaders Liverpool on Sunday when Pedro Neto’s effort was chalked off because wing-back Jonny was deemed to be offside in the build-up.Wolves eventually lost 1-0 at Anfield and Coady told the BBC afterwards: “A lot of people are going to tell me that they have come to the right decision and they might have. But what is it, an armpit that’s offside, or a toe, or something like that?”last_img read more

Read More →