Half-time: Burton Albion 0 QPR 0

first_imgJunior Hoilett hit the bar for QPR in the first half of their Capital One Cup second-round clash at the Pirelli Stadium, where Adel Taarabt was given a starting place.Taarabt, making his first appearance for Rangers since May 2013, dragged a shot wide following good work by Karl Henry.Hoilett then almost put the visitors ahead when his shot from near the edge of the penalty area struck the woodwork.And Hoilett went close again, in spectacular fashion, when he was found by Taarabt and cleverly dinked the ball over a defender only to then shoot over the bar.But Burton caused plenty of problems and Alex MacDonald missed a good chance for the League Two side early on.Rangers keeper Brian Murphy then saved from Dominic Knowles, who should have scored, and produced a fine stop to deny the dangerous MacDonald shortly before the interval. Burton: McLaughlin, Edwards, Cansdell-Sherriff, Mousinho, Taft, Sharps, MacDonald, Knowles, McGurk, Palmer, Harness. Subs: Lyness, McFadzean, Bell, Weir, Beavon, Blyth, Slade. QPR: Murphy, Simpson, Onuoha, Dunne, Hill, Hoilett, Henry, Faurlin, Wright-Phillips, Taarabt, Phillips.  Subs: Green, Fer, Mutch, Zamora, Ehmer, Doughty, Harriman.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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African reality TV fights HIV

first_imgThe third series of Imagine Afrika beganairing across 38 countries in Africa on4 November. It was filmed in Botswana,Côte d’Ivoire and Uganda.(Image: Chris Kirchhoff,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more freephotos visit the image library)MEDIA CONTACTS• Carolyn CarewBorn Free Media+2711 912 7733+27 83 274 [email protected] NdlovuImagine Afrika, Africa’s first continent-wide reality television series, aims to tackle the spread of HIV by exploring the day-to-day lives of young people from diverse communities in broadcasts watched by more than 200-million people.Using the tagline: “Imagine the Possibility of an HIV free Generation: It Begins with YOU!”, the African inspired and produced series looks at the key factors driving HIV/Aids and encourages Africans to consider what they can do to stop the spread of the virus in the continent.Currently in its 3rd season, the series is an initiative of the African Broadcast Media Partnership against HIV/AIDS (ABMP), a coalition of 60 African broadcast companies across 38 countries. ABMP focuses on incorporating HIV/Aids as part of broadcasters’ core business and ensuring integration of Aids-related messages and themes across all programmes formats and schedules.ABMP launched the Imagine Afrika series in 2007. It is filmed in community locations in different African countries and flighted across the continent with a viewership of more than 200 million people. The series goes inside the lives of youth from Africa selected by their communities for their compelling and challenging life circumstances.Viewers get to explore the characters’ day-to-day lives, hopes, challenges and aspirations, and share in their personal triumphs and trauma as they struggle with issues related to youth lifestyle, vulnerable children and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.The first two seasons were structured as a competition. They featured 12 contestants competing in three teams over 13 weeks in various countries. They worked with local communities to initiate efforts to address local problems. In season one, contestants worked in South Africa, Ghana, Rwanda, Mozambique, and Uganda. In the second season, the filming locations were South Africa, Côte d’Ivoire; and Kenya.The primary goal of the competition was to demonstrate the power of personal initiative, self-esteem, and leadership in building a better future for Africa. The contestants focused on factors driving the HIV/Aids epidemic such as poverty, lack of opportunity, and lack of services. Using their own life experiences and working closely with the community, season II contestants found ways of tackling basic problems like housing for vulnerable children, the environment, and HIV/Aids prevention, treatment and care.According to the series directors, the first two seasons were intended to draw audiences into problem-solving and decision-making processes as the teams demonstrated their talents and leadership.Beneath the surfaceFlighting of the third series began across 38 countries in Africa on 4 November. It was filmed in Botswana, Côte d’Ivoire and Uganda with production and post-production in South Africa.The series is produced by a team of award-winning filmmakers from South Africa, headed by Carolyn Carew as executive producer. Mickey Dube is the series director supported by directors: Bearthur Baker filming in Uganda, Mangaliso Bhengu filming in Botswana and Patrick Vergenyst filming in Côte d’Ivoire.The series targets young adults, 18-35 years and aims to entertain engage and educate by showing real life struggles and situations that are unscripted. Carew said: “Imagine Afrika III is a dramatic departure from the first two series because there is no competition as such, but much more in-depth exploration of real people’s lives. The result is much more compelling and dramatic, but also a more substantive opportunity to explore issues.”This year, series anchor Nzinga Qunta is joined by Imagine Afrika I contestant Milton Manhenje. Three more former Imagine Afrika contestants – Kitso Masi in Botswana, Coulibaly Miniatteni in Côte d’Ivoire and Brenda Amongin in Uganda – act as “i-Reporters”, becoming the viewers’ eyes and ears. They shadow the lives of nine young Africans through the series.Making the changeKitso Masi focuses on the life of fellow countryman Onkarabele “Ntoro” Kebadilwe (22). Ntoro never finished Form one (grade eight) because he opted to stay at home as his mother was struggling to pay school fees. She has since passed away. He started making an income by gathering and selling firewood, but his donkeys ran away and he had no way of carting the firewood to the market. He then resorted to stealing, which landed him in jail. He has just been released from prison after being incarcerated for two months – and says he wants to change. Ntoro wants to be a kwaito star, and with the money earned from music, he says he would go back to school. But he is in a gang and is not well-liked in his village.Coulibaly Miniatteni is on the trail of three characters from Côte d’Ivoire — Coffie “Kofi” Niezan (22), Desiree “Des” Cocoth (23) and Jean Damien “Bolatch” Ndri (25) — who epitomize youth lifestyles in a country where young people under the age of 25 represent 64% of the total population.Kofi is from the suburbs; dealing with trust, love and responsibility. Des is a young mother and a dancer. Her struggle is to make a career out of dancing and confront traditional norms. She wants her one‐year old daughter to live with her, but tradition dictates that since they are not married, the child belongs to the father. Bolatch is part of the hip‐hop generation, a sensitive rapper, in need of communication with his father and to assert his identity.Brenda Amongin in Uganda brings it home with Barbara Kemigisa (23), a single HIV positive mother of four month old Courtney. She went on the PMTCT programme when she was pregnant. Resourceful and charismatic, she survives by doing testimonials about her status and selling coffee and hot chocolate – but she wants more out of life.Jackie Alessie (23), nine months pregnant, is in a PMTCT programme. Rachel Kyomugisha (27) is strong and resilient – she was born HIV positive. She was raised by her grandmother who inspired her to move forward with her life. Her story is a love story. She met her husband at an HIV treatment centre; he later proposed, and now they are expecting a child.The series goes beneath the surface, following these characters as they face their life challenges and work towards realising their dreams.HIV/Aids facts in AfricaAccording to a research fact sheet (PDF, 0.09 KB) compiled by the Kaiser Family Foundation, in November 2009 more than 5 000 new HIV infections occur in Africa every day. The research states that an estimated 15 million African children are growing up without parents because of HIV/Aids. Global Health Reporting. org estimates 1.5 million Africans (adults and children) die of HIV/Aids every year.Aids and HIV information from the UNAids charity Avert reports that approximately 2.1 million Africans are currently enrolled for Aids treatment. Only one in five Africans who need Aids treatment currently receive it. For every one person enrolled on Aids treatment there are five new HIV infections.last_img read more

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The Rivonia Trialists today

first_imgBob Hepple still lives in England. Ahmed Kathrada is now retired.(Images: Lucille Davie)MEDIA CONTACTS • Sello HatangCEO and spokespersonNelson Mandela Centre of Memory+27 11 547 5600.RELATED ARTICLES• Madiba’s legacy is forever• Mandela posters show world’s respect• Liliesleaf remembered 50 years on• From Liliesleaf to Robben Island• Travelling the Mandela RouteLucille DavieHe was Accused No 1, and he was the last man to be released from jail. Nelson Mandela stood accused with 10 others in the Rivonia Trial in 1964, all on trial for sabotage, which carried the death penalty.But they didn’t go to the gallows. Instead, eight men got life imprisonment, serving from 22 to 27 years. At the trial, Judge Quartus de Wet said: “I have decided not to impose the supreme penalty, which would usually be death for such a crime. But consistent with my duty, that is the only leniency which I can show. The sentence in the case of all the accused will be one of life imprisonment…”Mandela’s fellow accused were Ahmed Kathrada, Andrew Mlangeni, Raymond Mhlaba, Walter Sisulu, Elias Motsoaledi, Govan Mbeki, James Kantor, Lionel “Rusty” Bernstein, and Bob Hepple.Bernstein and Kantor were acquitted in late 1963, and charges against Hepple were withdrawn, after which he fled to England, where he still lives.But where are the trialists now?Nelson MandelaMandela became South Africa’s first democratic president in 1994, stepping down in 1999. He joined the African National Congress (ANC) in 1943, and was one of the group which formed the ANC Youth League in 1944. He was the Transvaal president and national volunteer-in-chief of the 1952 Defiance Campaign. He was arrested and tried for treason with 156 others in 1956, and acquitted in 1961. He was detained under the state of emergency in 1960, and on his release, went underground. He co-founded Mkhonto we Sizwe (MK, Spear of the Nation), the ANC’s military division, and was its first commander-in-chief, leaving the country for five months in 1962 for military training. After 17 months on the run Mandela was arrested in August 1962 for leaving South Africa without a passport, and for inciting workers to strike. He was serving five years’ imprisonment on Robben Island for these crimes, when he was charged with sabotage, along with those arrested at Liliesleaf. He was the last Rivonia trialist to be released from prison, on 11 February 1990. He celebrated his 95th birthday in hospital on 18 July 2013, being treated for a recurring lung infection.Ahmed KathradaKathrada or Kathy, Accused No 5, was released in 1989 and became a member of parliament in 1994, and served as adviser to Mandela during his tenure as president. He joined the Young Communist League at the age of 12, and was a member of the South African Communist Party (SACP) central committee. After frequent bannings, arrests and house arrests, he went underground in April 1963, but was arrested at Liliesleaf in July of that year. While imprisoned on Robben Island he obtained four degrees. After 1994 he was appointed as parliamentary counsellor to President Mandela. From 1997 to 2006 he was chairman of the Robben Island Council. He has written three books and received many awards. He is now retired and consults to the Nelson Mandela Foundation.Andrew MlangeniAccused No 10, Mlangeni was released in 1989 and became a member of Parliament, a position he still holds. He was a trade unionist and was active in the bus boycott and strike in 1955. He joined the ANC Youth League in 1951, and was a member of the SACP and MK. He was sent for military training in 1962, and was arrested on his return in 1963. Mlangeni received the ANC’s Isitwalandwe Award in 1992 for his contribution to the liberation struggle.Raymond MhlabaA former commander-in-chief of MK, Mhlaba was Accused No 7. He was released from Pollsmoor Prison in 1989 and in 1991 was elected to the ANC national executive and the SACP central committee, becoming national party chairman in 1995. In 1994 he became premier of the Eastern Cape and served in this role until 1997. He was then appointed high commissioner to Uganda and Rwanda, retiring in 2001. In 2003 he had a stroke and in 2004 was diagnosed with liver cancer. He died in 2005 in Port Elizabeth. Mhlaba received the ANC’s Isitwalandwe Award in 1992 for his contribution to the liberation struggle, and the Moses Kotane Award in 2002 for his contribution to the SACP.Walter SisuluWalter Sisulu, Mandela’s great friend, was Accused No 2. He was the former secretary-general of the ANC, and very influential in the movement. He moved back into his small four-roomed house in Soweto after his release in 1989, at the age of 77. He took up ANC duties but after democratic elections in 1994 retired from politics. Sisulu and his wife Albertina moved into the northern suburbs of Johannesburg, because he needed to be closer to his doctors, his health now failing. In May 2003 he died peacefully in Albertina’s arms at his home, at the age of 90.Denis GoldbergAccused No 3, Goldberg spent 22 years in Pretoria Central, isolated from his fellow Rivonia trialists because white prisoners weren’t sent to Robben Island. In 1985 the government offered to release any political prisoner who renounced armed struggle. Goldberg accepted, and after visiting his daughter briefly in Israel, moved to England, where he represented the ANC at the UN’s Anti-Apartheid Committee. He founded Community HEART in 1995 to help poor black South Africans overcome the legacy left by apartheid. Goldberg returned to South Africa in 2002 and became a member of Parliament. He lives in Cape Town, and after serving for several years as a special adviser to the ministry of water affairs and forestry, has now retired.Elias MotsoalediMotsoaledi was Accused No 9. He was a trade unionist and a member of the Council of Non-European Trade Unions. He was banned after the 1952 Defiance Campaign and helped establish the South African Congress of Trade Unions in 1955. He was imprisoned for four months during the 1960 state of emergency and detained under the 90-day detention laws of 1963. He was released from Robben Island in 1989, and elected to the ANC’s National Executive Committee on his release. Motsoaledi He was awarded the ANC’s Isitwalandwe Award in 1992 for his contribution to the liberation struggle. He died in 1994.Govan MbekiThe father of former president Thabo Mbeki, and Accused No 4, Mbeki was a teacher, trade union organiser, journalist and writer. He joined the ANC in 1935 and the SACP in 1953. He was a member of the SACP central committee, the ANC national executive committee and the MK high command. He went underground in November 1962 and was arrested at Liliesleaf. After his release from Robben Island in 1987, he was elected deputy president of the Senate, the precursor of the National Council of the Provinces, the country’s second parliament. Mbeki was also a recipient of the Isithwalandwe award. He wrote several books: South Africa: The Peasants’ Revolt, The Struggle for Liberation in South Africa and Sunset at Midday. He died in 2001 in Port Elizabeth.Bob HeppleCharges were dropped against Hepple, Accused No 11, and he was released. The prosecution was hoping he would turn state witness, but he immediately fled to England with his wife, to be joined there by his parents with his two young children. He went on to have a long and distinguished legal career in that country – he is an international expert and activist in labour law, equality and human rights; emeritus master of Clare College and emeritus professor of law at the University of Cambridge in England; and has received several awards and honours, including a knighthood in 2004. He has just published a book, titled Young man with a Red Tie: a memoir of Mandela and the Failed Revolution 1960-1963. It recounts his escape to avoid testifying against the Rivonia trialists.Rusty BernsteinRusty Bernstein, Accused No 6, was acquitted in the Rivonia Trial, but arrested again soon after and released on bail. He fled the country and lived with his wife Hilda and family in England, working as an architect until he died in June 2002. Bernstein remained a member of the ANC until his death at the age of 82. He joined the Communist Party in 1938, and was a founder member of the South African Congress of Democrats. He was the principal drafter of the 1955 Freedom Charter. After 1994 he made several trips to South Africa but continued to live just outside Oxford in England. In 1999 he published his autobiography, Memory against Forgetting.James KantorAccused No 8 was Kantor, a lawyer but not a member of the ANC or MK. He was one of the trialists, possibly because his brother-in-law and business partner was Harold Wolpe, who had been arrested at Liliesleaf, and was a member of the ANC and the SACP. When Kantor was acquitted at the trial, he fled the country, and died in London in 1974, at the age of 47.Wolpe escaped from the Marshall Square Police Station, together with Goldreich and Mosie Moola and Abdulhay Jassat, and after hiding out in Johannesburg for two months, Wolpe and Goldreich escaped across the border, and flew to London. Goldreich moved to Israel in 1964, where he died in 2011. Wolpe lived with his family for 27 years in London, where he became an academic. He remained an active member of the ANC and the SACP. In 1991 he and his wife and son returned to South Africa, settling in Cape Town, leaving their two daughters in Europe. He died in 1996 at the age of 70.Mosie Moola and Abdulhay Jassat made their way to India after their release, but ended up back in South Africa. Moola served as ambassador in various embassies, and is now based in Johannesburg. He works in the department of foreign affairs. Jassat (who still suffers from epilepsy as a result of his torture) was in exile for 32 years. He is now a businessman in Johannesburg.last_img read more

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New Ag Census Data Released

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorWASHINGTON (DTN) — There were fewer middle-sized farms in 2017 than five years earlier, and the age of the average farm operator continues to tick upward, according to results of the 2017 Census of Agriculture released Thursday.USDA boasted the 2017 Census of Agriculture includes 6.4 million new points of information about farms and ranches and the people who run them, breaking down more information to the county level. The data is used by policymakers to help determine local funding for a variety of programs, and the census data is often used to highlight specific information about farms and ranches.USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service said the data shows that both farm numbers and land in farms have had small declines since the last census in 2012. There are more large farms and more small farms but fewer “middle-sized farms,” according to the data. The average age of all farmers and ranchers also continues to rise.According to the data, there were 85,127 farms with 2,000 or more acres in 2017, and those operators made up 58% of all farmland. At the same time, the 273,000 smallest farmers, each with under 10 acres of ground, made up just 0.1% of all farm ground.There are 2.04 million farms and ranches, down 3.2% from 2012, with an average size of 441 acres, which is up 1.6%, from 2017. Combined, farms and ranches operate on 900 million acres of ground, which is down 1.6% from 2012.Fewer farmers make up the bulk of U.S. farm sales, USDA noted. Just 105,453 farms produced 75% of all sales in 2017, down from 119,908 in 2012.Of the 2.04 million farms and ranches, the 76,865 making $1 million or more in 2017 represent just over two-thirds of the $389 billion in total value of production, while the 1.56 million operations making under $50,000 represent just 2.9%.According to USDA, the average age of all farmers and ranchers is 57.5 years, up 1.2 years from the 2012 average.The Ag Census showed 96% of farms and ranches are family owned.Farm expenses topped $326 billion in 2017 with feed, livestock purchased, hired labor, fertilizer and cash rents topping the list of farm expenses.While average farm income was $43,053 in 2017, a total of 56.4% of farmers had negative net cash farm income that year. USDA highlighted 43.6% of farmers had positive net cash income.A total of 130,056 farms in 2017 sold directly to consumers, but sales reached $2.8 billion. That breaks down to average sales of roughly $2,153 per farm.Regarding the internet of things, farms with internet access rose from 69.6% in 2012 to 75.4% in 2017. Still, roughly one-quarter of all farms do not have internet access.Renewable energy systems on farms exploded from 2012 to 2017. A total of 133,176 farms and ranches use renewable-energy-producing systems, more than double the 57,299 in 2012.USDA changed some demographic questions for the 2017 census to better draw in all of the people involved in the decision-making on farms. By doing so, the number of farmers and ranchers rose nearly 7% to 3.4 million people, with most of the growth because of multiple producers added per farm. Most of the new producers added were female as well.The number of male farmers and ranchers fell 1.7% to 2.17 million from 2012 to 2017, while the number of female farmers and ranchers rose by nearly 27% to 1.23 million. USDA stated, “This change underscores the effectiveness of the questionnaire changes.”The changes show 36% of all farmers and ranchers are female and 56% of all farms have at least one female decision-maker. Farms with female producers making decisions tend to be smaller than average in both acres and value of production. Female farmers and ranchers are most heavily engaged in the day-to-day decisions along with record keeping and financial management.There are 321,261 young producers age 35 or younger on 240,141 farms. Farms with young producers making decisions tend to be larger than average in both acres and sales.Other demographic highlights include:— The number of producers who have served in the military is 370,619, or 11% of all farmers and ranchers.— One in four producers is a beginning farmer with 10 or fewer years of experience and an average age of 46.3. Farms with new or beginning producers making decisions tend to be smaller than average in both acres and value of production.GROUPS REACT TO NEW DATAThe National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA) highlighted the census release, stating the data provides the only source of uniform, comprehensive and impartial agriculture data for every county in the nation. Census data provides federal, state and industry groups with data necessary to make informed decisions about agriculture, food and rural development, NASDA stated.“Census data is crucial for understanding large trends and issues such as trading markets and the impact of natural disasters,” said Barb Glenn, NASDA’s CEO. “Good policymaking starts with ample and unbiased data. We encourage everyone to take advantage of this irreplaceable resource.”The National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition said in a news release Thursday that the main takeaway from the new ag census data is that consolidation in agriculture is resulting in the loss of more medium-sized family farms and concentrating wealth and power among fewer, larger agribusinesses.“The 2017 Census of Agriculture puts hard data behind what American farmers and farmer advocates have known for some time — if we don’t invest in beginning farmers and the advancement of our family farms, and if we don’t put checks on increasing consolidation in agriculture, we’re going to be at risk of losing the ag of the middle entirely,” Juli Obudzinski, NSAC’s interim policy director, stated in the news release.However, Obudzinski also noted there were several positive points in the census that can serve as “guideposts” for determining the right investments and making food and farm policy decisions at the federal level.“Beginning farmers have increased by 5% over the last five years, for example. That’s a clear sign that interest in agriculture is rising — but it also means that we’ve got to increase our investment in support and outreach to meet that rising interest,” Obudzinski said. “We’re also seeing great trends in the organic industry — average organic sales per farm grew by 84% and the number of acres transitioning into certified organic also increased by 15% over the same period. Similarly, local food sales continue to rise; the sector is up by roughly $1.5 billion since the last Census.”To view the full 2017 Census of Agriculture report, visit: https://www.nass.usda.gov/….For the USDA NASS Quick Stats data query tool, visit https://www.nass.usda.gov/….Chris Clayton can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(BAS/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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