Travel Alert: Oil spill outside Lifford

first_imgMotorists are being advised take care following an oil spill outside Lifford.The spill occurred on the Rossgeir – St Johnston road after midday.Donegal county council has been notified. AA roadwatch is warning motorists to drive with extra caution in the area.Travel Alert: Oil spill outside Lifford was last modified: December 14th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More →

African reality TV fights HIV

first_imgThe third series of Imagine Afrika beganairing across 38 countries in Africa on4 November. It was filmed in Botswana,Côte d’Ivoire and Uganda.(Image: Chris Kirchhoff,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more freephotos visit the image library)MEDIA CONTACTS• Carolyn CarewBorn Free Media+2711 912 7733+27 83 274 [email protected] NdlovuImagine Afrika, Africa’s first continent-wide reality television series, aims to tackle the spread of HIV by exploring the day-to-day lives of young people from diverse communities in broadcasts watched by more than 200-million people.Using the tagline: “Imagine the Possibility of an HIV free Generation: It Begins with YOU!”, the African inspired and produced series looks at the key factors driving HIV/Aids and encourages Africans to consider what they can do to stop the spread of the virus in the continent.Currently in its 3rd season, the series is an initiative of the African Broadcast Media Partnership against HIV/AIDS (ABMP), a coalition of 60 African broadcast companies across 38 countries. ABMP focuses on incorporating HIV/Aids as part of broadcasters’ core business and ensuring integration of Aids-related messages and themes across all programmes formats and schedules.ABMP launched the Imagine Afrika series in 2007. It is filmed in community locations in different African countries and flighted across the continent with a viewership of more than 200 million people. The series goes inside the lives of youth from Africa selected by their communities for their compelling and challenging life circumstances.Viewers get to explore the characters’ day-to-day lives, hopes, challenges and aspirations, and share in their personal triumphs and trauma as they struggle with issues related to youth lifestyle, vulnerable children and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.The first two seasons were structured as a competition. They featured 12 contestants competing in three teams over 13 weeks in various countries. They worked with local communities to initiate efforts to address local problems. In season one, contestants worked in South Africa, Ghana, Rwanda, Mozambique, and Uganda. In the second season, the filming locations were South Africa, Côte d’Ivoire; and Kenya.The primary goal of the competition was to demonstrate the power of personal initiative, self-esteem, and leadership in building a better future for Africa. The contestants focused on factors driving the HIV/Aids epidemic such as poverty, lack of opportunity, and lack of services. Using their own life experiences and working closely with the community, season II contestants found ways of tackling basic problems like housing for vulnerable children, the environment, and HIV/Aids prevention, treatment and care.According to the series directors, the first two seasons were intended to draw audiences into problem-solving and decision-making processes as the teams demonstrated their talents and leadership.Beneath the surfaceFlighting of the third series began across 38 countries in Africa on 4 November. It was filmed in Botswana, Côte d’Ivoire and Uganda with production and post-production in South Africa.The series is produced by a team of award-winning filmmakers from South Africa, headed by Carolyn Carew as executive producer. Mickey Dube is the series director supported by directors: Bearthur Baker filming in Uganda, Mangaliso Bhengu filming in Botswana and Patrick Vergenyst filming in Côte d’Ivoire.The series targets young adults, 18-35 years and aims to entertain engage and educate by showing real life struggles and situations that are unscripted. Carew said: “Imagine Afrika III is a dramatic departure from the first two series because there is no competition as such, but much more in-depth exploration of real people’s lives. The result is much more compelling and dramatic, but also a more substantive opportunity to explore issues.”This year, series anchor Nzinga Qunta is joined by Imagine Afrika I contestant Milton Manhenje. Three more former Imagine Afrika contestants – Kitso Masi in Botswana, Coulibaly Miniatteni in Côte d’Ivoire and Brenda Amongin in Uganda – act as “i-Reporters”, becoming the viewers’ eyes and ears. They shadow the lives of nine young Africans through the series.Making the changeKitso Masi focuses on the life of fellow countryman Onkarabele “Ntoro” Kebadilwe (22). Ntoro never finished Form one (grade eight) because he opted to stay at home as his mother was struggling to pay school fees. She has since passed away. He started making an income by gathering and selling firewood, but his donkeys ran away and he had no way of carting the firewood to the market. He then resorted to stealing, which landed him in jail. He has just been released from prison after being incarcerated for two months – and says he wants to change. Ntoro wants to be a kwaito star, and with the money earned from music, he says he would go back to school. But he is in a gang and is not well-liked in his village.Coulibaly Miniatteni is on the trail of three characters from Côte d’Ivoire — Coffie “Kofi” Niezan (22), Desiree “Des” Cocoth (23) and Jean Damien “Bolatch” Ndri (25) — who epitomize youth lifestyles in a country where young people under the age of 25 represent 64% of the total population.Kofi is from the suburbs; dealing with trust, love and responsibility. Des is a young mother and a dancer. Her struggle is to make a career out of dancing and confront traditional norms. She wants her one‐year old daughter to live with her, but tradition dictates that since they are not married, the child belongs to the father. Bolatch is part of the hip‐hop generation, a sensitive rapper, in need of communication with his father and to assert his identity.Brenda Amongin in Uganda brings it home with Barbara Kemigisa (23), a single HIV positive mother of four month old Courtney. She went on the PMTCT programme when she was pregnant. Resourceful and charismatic, she survives by doing testimonials about her status and selling coffee and hot chocolate – but she wants more out of life.Jackie Alessie (23), nine months pregnant, is in a PMTCT programme. Rachel Kyomugisha (27) is strong and resilient – she was born HIV positive. She was raised by her grandmother who inspired her to move forward with her life. Her story is a love story. She met her husband at an HIV treatment centre; he later proposed, and now they are expecting a child.The series goes beneath the surface, following these characters as they face their life challenges and work towards realising their dreams.HIV/Aids facts in AfricaAccording to a research fact sheet (PDF, 0.09 KB) compiled by the Kaiser Family Foundation, in November 2009 more than 5 000 new HIV infections occur in Africa every day. The research states that an estimated 15 million African children are growing up without parents because of HIV/Aids. Global Health Reporting. org estimates 1.5 million Africans (adults and children) die of HIV/Aids every year.Aids and HIV information from the UNAids charity Avert reports that approximately 2.1 million Africans are currently enrolled for Aids treatment. Only one in five Africans who need Aids treatment currently receive it. For every one person enrolled on Aids treatment there are five new HIV infections.last_img read more

Read More →

South Africans talk social cohesion

first_img5 July 2012South Africans have embarked on an in-depth process of deciding what kind of society they want to create – and a major part of that process is the National Social Cohesion Summit taking place at the Walter Sisulu Square of Dedication in Kliptown, Soweto.Some 3 000 delegates joined summit host President Jacob Zuma, arts and culture minister Paul Mashatile, members of the cabinet, MPs, and representatives from the various political parties and civil society bodies, to come up with a declaration of what needs to be done to create a caring and proud society.The summit is taking place on 4 and 5 July 2012, and features discussions on the role of organs of state such as the judiciary, Parliament and other legislative bodies and political parties, as well as the role of civil society, including business and labour, and other NGOs such as the Foundation for Human Rights, Molo Songololo and Lead SA.The summit, Mashatile said, aims to “carve a shared destiny that the country belongs to all who live in it’, deepening the development that has been taking place since the advent of democracy 18 years ago.Under the theme Working together to create a caring and proud society, delegates will decide on the steps to take to lead to a society where, despite differences, South African-ness comes first.“We must use our diversity to compel us to a common future,’ Mashatile added.Not only a talk shopThe National Social Cohesion Summit is not a talk shop, but must bring about something tangible to work towards.In his opening speech, Zuma noted that the summit was “a crucial dialogue’ where people had come together “to bring to life what our forebears left for us as a legacy’ – this country that belongs to all.All the speakers emphasised that the summit’s theme reflected on South Africa’s history of selflessness, as well as the vision of the leaders in the democratic movement, in burying apartheid and building a new society.South Africans, Zuma said, are unique, “a people with an inspiring history’ who do not hesitate to tackle difficulties and challenges.“We are going to try and find a way to live together in peace and harmony, building a united nation,’ he said.Freedom Charter to help social cohesionThis summit will look at how best to bring about a cohesive, democratic and prosperous society. In mapping the direction, cognisance has to be taken of the challenges of poverty, unemployment, inequality, homelessness, landlessness and divisions of race, class and gender.During the event, various commissions will explore aspects of economic inequality, spatial divisions, social engagement, issues around prejudice and discrimination, and national identity.At the end of the two-day gathering a declaration will be drawn up – a living document with guidelines and outcomes.Delegates are drawn from all walks of life, from across the country – and the choice of venue is no coincidence. Speaker after speaker referred to the Freedom Charter, the original road map to democracy that was drawn up on that very spot in 1955.South Africa’s Constitution strongly echoes the points drawn up in the Charter, and its preamble picks up the founding principles of that significant declaration: “We, the people of South Africa, recognise the injustices of our past; honour those who suffered for justice and freedom in our land; respect those who have worked to build and develop our country; and believe that South Africa belongs to all who live in it, united in our diversity.’Now, almost two decades into a democratic state, is the time to reflect on these foundations and forge a future where all South Africans can call this country “home’.Principles of social cohesionAccording to the Department of Arts and Culture, social cohesion and nation building can only be based on the following principles: constitution and democracy; human rights and equality; non-racialism, non-tribalism and non-sexism; unity in diversity; inclusivity and social justice; redress and transformation; intergroup and community co-operation; social solidarity; active citizenship; civic responsibility; and national consciousness.“These principles serve as the touchstone of social cohesion and are aimed at fostering shared values and greater cohesion within diverse communities and national unity between them and across the country,’ said Mashatile.Views of political parties on social cohesionPolitical parties ranging from the African National Congress (ANC); the opposition Democratic Alliance (DA); Inkatha Freedom Party; Minority Front; and the Pan Africanist Congress gave their views on how they can help in fostering social cohesion.ANC secretary-general Gwede Mantashe said: “As a country we should make sure of the independence of the three pillars of the state – the judiciary, legislature and executive – and that of the media is upheld.’DA leader Helen Zille gave a multilingual speech citing the importance of languages in gaining social cohesion.“We should make policies that strengthen society and give youngsters the opportunity to work and develop the country into what they want it to be,’ said Zille.MediaClubSouthAfrica.com reporter – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Read More →

Brand SA and Muslim Judicial Council to highlight religious tolerance in South Africa

first_imgBrand South Africa and the Muslim Judicial Council discuss their collaboration. From left, Thoko Modise, Manager: Civil Society, Brand South Africa; MI Abdul Khaliq Allie, Secretary General, Muslim Judicial Council; Sithembile Ntombela, General Manager: Marketing, Brand South Africa; Shaykh Achmat Sedick, Director, Muslim Judicial Council; and Dr Petrus de Kock, General Manager: Research, Brand South Africa.Brand South Africa and the Muslim Judicial Council have entered into an agreement to work together to tell the good story of religious tolerance in South Africa, following a meeting in late February to discuss collaboration between the two organisations.South Africa’s Muslim Judicial Council, or MJC, is a non-profit faith-based organisation established in 1945. It is one of the country’s oldest, most representative and most influential religious organisations and enjoys local and international credibility.The MJC Halaal Trust is a major role-player in the positive promotion of and orientation on halal lifestyle for South African Muslims, specifically, and other communities, globally.The MJC is founded on the values of Ubuntu and tolerance, and speaks to South Africa’s motto of unity in diversity.A diverse but integrated societyOften referred to as the “rainbow nation”, South Africa is home to a fascinating mix of people. We are Africans, and people of European, Asian and mixed-race descent, enjoying hybrid mixtures of different cultures. But our overarching South African culture ensures that, no matter what a person’s heritage, they are, at heart, proudly South African.Indeed, as South Africa’s democracy evolves, it is becoming a more diverse but integrated country. Cultural diversity continues to be one of its strongest assets.MJC and Brand South Africa: the alignmentThe MJC’s alignment to the country’s values and ethos makes its fit with Brand South Africa more natural. While religious tolerance is a challenge in many countries, it is a success story in South Africa.Another of South Africa’s successes is not widely told: its important role in peacekeeping elsewhere on the African continent.Following the agreement, Brand South Africa will work with the MJC to promote the good story of religious tolerance in South Africa, a story that will contribute positively to the country’s reputation.The two organisations have agreed to collaborate on future stakeholder engagements, particularly international delegation strategic platforms.last_img read more

Read More →

National Library of Finland Turns to Crowdsourcing, Games to Help Digitize Its Archives

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… audrey watters Related Posts center_img The National Library of Finland has launched a new program to support the digitization efforts of its archives. The project, Digitalkoot (Digital Volunteers), blends microtasks, crowdsourcing, and video games to break up and distribute some of the dull repetitive work of verifying digitized records.“We have millions and millions of pages of historically and culturally valuable magazines, newspapers and journals online. The challenge is that the optical character recognition often contains errors and omissions, which hamper for example searches,” says Kai Ekholm, Director of the National Library of Finland. “Manual correction is needed to weed out these mistakes so that the texts become machine readable, enabling scholars and archivists to search the material for the information they need.”In order to accomplish this, the National Library has joined forces with Microtask, with the latter helping to design two games that will make this work entertaining. In ‘Mole Hunt’ (Myyräjahti), the player is shown two different words, and they must determine as quickly as possible if they are the same. This uncovers erroneous words in archived material. In ‘Mole Bridge’ (Myyräsilta), players have to spell correctly the words appearing on the screen. Correct answers help badgers build a bridge across a river. Again, the game helps verify the OCR and make sure that digitized materials are accurate and searchable.“We wanted to set up ‘Angry Birds for the Thinking Person’ – something which entertains but is also useful to us as a nation,” says Ekholm, who anticipates teachers and children will enjoy volunteering to help these digitization efforts. Additional phases of the project will be aimed at “more serious historical buffs.”As libraries and archives worldwide are moving to digitize their collections, they face many challenges – in terms of technology, funding, access, and planning. To date, four million pages of different types of texts from the 18th to 20th centuries have been digitized, but there still remain huge bulks of cultural heritage archived only in paper files. “Our archives are national cultural heritage,” says Ekholm. “I am proud that even such a small nation as we are able to launch something like this.” 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Tags:#news#web last_img read more

Read More →

Google Now Opens Up To iPhone And iPad Users

first_imgToday, Google’s Googliest project makes the leap from Android to iOS. Google Now, announced last June at the company’s I/O 2012 conference, is part smart search and part personal assistant — but don’t call it Siri. The service will make its debut on iOS through an update to Google’s core Search app, available in the App Store.According to Google’s blog post on the release, “Today, with the launch of Google Now on iPhone and iPad, your smartphone will become even smarter. Google Now is about giving you just the right information at just the right time. Together, Google Now and voice search will make your day run a little smoother.”Google Now for iOS will be nearly identical to the Android release, though it won’t enjoy the same deep integration as it does on Google’s own mobile platform. That means no homescreen widget, of course, and no “swipe up” gesture for instant, fluid access. The iOS version will also be missing a few of the cards you’d find on Android: For now, cards for boarding passes, nearby events, Fandago and Zillow will remain an Android exclusive.   A 20% Project That Took OffWe spoke with Google’s Baris Gultekin, co-creator of Google Now, about the product’s migration to that other platform. According to Gultekin, Google Now is the latest product home run with humble beginnings as a year-long 20% project (Google encourages employees to dedicate 20% of their time to a pet project that interests them).“In the early days it was all about keywords,” Gultekin explains. “With Google Now, you don’t even have to search. We’re really interested in having computers do all the hard work.” For Google Now, the heavy lifting comes easy. A smart search app on steroids, it provides instant access to a spread of useful information, delivered via “cards”. The cards are wholly dependent on context. As Gultekin puts it, “The product is different given the situation you’re in.” You might see a card for commute traffic around rush hour, or a card for your flight reservation the morning before you head to the airport.Google Now Is Google, NowGoogle Now is an umbrella project of sorts, tying Google’s vast web of products together. Naturally, the product is also right at home on Google Glass, the company’s futuristic eyewear that also aims to make this whole business of carrying the Internet less interruptive.Google is betting big on Google Now, so it will be interesting to see if the service takes off in Apple’s ecosystem. Google iOS ports like Google Maps are wildly popular, but will iPhone users take notice of Google Now? From its perfect morsels of context-dependent info to its uncanny knack for knowing what you needed to know before you knew you needed to know it, Google Now is a powerful tool — and a fun one.Try it out today in the App Store and have fun pitting it against Siri in voice-powered search time trials.You know you want to. Tags:#Future Tech#Google#Google Now#search Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img taylor hatmaker Related Posts The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Read More →