Frogs dominate Cyclones, end losing streak

first_imgColin Post is a Sports Broadcasting and Journalism double-major from Houston, Texas. Along with sports writing, Colin hopes to work in sports announcing after he graduates. Twitter Colin Post printAfter starting the second half of conference play with a string of three losses, TCU volleyball dominated Iowa State 3-1 (25-15, 25-22, 22-25, 25-14) Saturday. The win was their 12th this season at home in the Rickel, which sold out for the 10th time this year.“I was impressed by how our team came out today,” head coach Jill Kramer said.  “That’s been something we’ve been trying to get better at … executing from the beginning.”After struggling to start well in most of their matches this season, TCU looked strong from the opening serve.  The Cyclones held on for a while, but the Frogs’ offense, led by middle blocker Sarah Swanson, was too much for them to handle.  Swanson had four kills in the first set alone, and TCU won easily, 25-15.Swanson would finish the match with a team-high 14 kills (tied with middle blocker Katie Clark), a team-high 7.0 blocks, and a career-best .667 hitting clip.Middle blocker Sarah Swanson (34) tied for a team-high 14 kills on Saturday. Photo by Cristian ArguetaSoto“I think getting Swanson going is something we’ve needed,” setter Tori Dilfer said.  “She gets going when she knows that she needs to get going.”Another positive note early for the Frogs had been outside hitter élan McCall’s first action in six matches after missing time with an injury.McCall finished the match with two kills and nine digs.  Her playing time is limited right now until she is fully recovered.Unable to start the second set as well as the first, the Frogs struggled to stop the Cyclones’ offense and fell behind 17-10. The Frogs then used a 6-0 run and strong defensive effort to climb back into the set.  An Anna Walsh kill sealed the win for TCU, giving them a 2-0 lead in the match.Outside hitter Lexi MacLean had led the Frogs on the defensive with six digs in the set.  She finished with a match-high 18 kills and two service aces.Despite their deficit, Iowa State started the third set even stronger than the second.  The Frogs’ defense couldn’t stop the Cyclones’ offense, and TCU trailed by seven once again,10-3, early in the set.Sustained excellence from Swanson and MacLean allowed the Horned Frogs to climb back into the set, but runs by the Cyclones proved too much, and TCU dropped the set 25-22.Then, Tori Dilfer happened.  The sophomore setter led the Frogs to a resounding 12-0 lead to start the fourth set.  During that span, she had two aces and three assists.“Momentum-wise it was awesome,”  Dilfer said. “Putting service pressure on them is always a big part of our game.”Dilfer would finish the match with 36 assists, 12 digs, and two kills.Setter Tori Dilfer (left) sparked a 12-0 TCU run in the fourth set that included two service aces.“I thought Tori did a great job running the offense today,” Kramer said.  “We needed to distribute the ball a little bit different, and she did a good job of that and then was like so good from the service line.”The early run and five total service aces propelled TCU to an easy 25-14 fourth set win, giving them a 3-1 victory in the match and ending their losing streak.“Ending a losing streak is huge for confidence,” Dilfer said.  “Not that every match before this hasn’t mattered just as much, but it all really matters right now.”The Frogs will get their final bye this week, returning to the court Friday, Nov. 9 to play Oklahoma.  First serve in Norman is set for 7 p.m. Facebook Colin Posthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/colin-post/ TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello + posts Colin Posthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/colin-post/ ReddIt Previous articleThe Skiff: November 1, 2018Next articleAthletics Weekend Roundup: equestrian triumphs, swim and dive falters, and women’s golf finishes strong Colin Post RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Colin Posthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/colin-post/ Linkedincenter_img Twitter First TCU spring game since 2018 gets fans primed for a highly-anticipated fall Colin Posthttps://www.tcu360.com/author/colin-post/ Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Linkedin Despite series loss, TCU proved they belong against No. 8 Texas Tech ReddIt Taylor’s monster slam highlights big weekend for TCU Athletics TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Facebook Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award last_img read more

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Is anybody out there?

first_img SEAL-tested, NASA-approved The question of whether we’re alone in the universe has haunted humankind for thousands of years, and it’s one astronomer Jill Tarter has tried to answer for much of her life. Tarter, chair emeritus of the Center for SETI Research, worked as a project scientist for NASA’s SETI program, which aimed to detect transmissions from alien intelligence. She currently serves on the board for the Allen Telescope Array, a group of more than 350 telescopes north of San Francisco.“We are looking for signals at some frequency, some wavelength that don’t look like what Mother Nature produces,” she said in 2014.Tarter, an inspiration behind the novel and film “Contact,” visited campus last month to participate in the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study’s science symposium “The Undiscovered,” which addressed how scientists “explore realities they cannot anticipate.” We spoke with her about her work and why it matters.Q&AJill TarterGAZETTE: When did you first start thinking about other worlds?TARTER: I think it was age 10 or so, walking on the west coast keys of Florida with my father and looking up at the sky. It just always seemed to me that probably walking along the beach on some other world there was some other creature with their father, looking and seeing our sun as a star in their sky.GAZETTE: When you were a child did you have the sense that looking for intelligent life was something you wanted to do for your career, or that you might become an astronaut?TARTER: I did apply to be an astronaut, but no, as a profession I stumbled onto it because I knew how to program an obsolete computer called a PDP84, and that piece of equipment was given to Stu Boyer, an astronomy professor who had a very clever idea for how to make use of the University of California, Berkeley, radio telescopes at Hat Creek to do a SETI search in a different way. He came and recruited me because I knew how to program that computer. For me, after millennia of asking priests and philosophers what we should believe, I just thought it was very exciting that right then in the middle of the 20th century we were beginning to have some tools — telescopes and computers — that allowed scientists and engineers to try to figure out what is, and not have to take somebody’s belief system. I thought that was really important and I got hooked.,GAZETTE: You’ve spoken a lot about the importance of perspective. What would finding other intelligent life do to our perspective on life in the universe and our own lives?TARTER: Even not finding it but trying to find it is important because it helps to give people a more cosmic perspective. I usually send people home from a lecture with a homework assignment, which is to go and alter their profiles on all of their social media so that the first thing they say about themselves is that they are an Earthling, because I think that this is the kind of perspective we are going to need to figure out how to solve all these really difficult challenges we have that don’t respect national boundaries. We’ve got to do it in a systemic global way, and I think the first step to getting there is to see ourselves in that context.GAZETTE: What are the odds are that we might find something?TARTER: It seems like there’s perhaps an impression that the universe has become more biofriendly in terms of what we think we know. But it doesn’t mean that all that habitable real estate is inhabited. That is the question. We don’t know the answer to that, but I think it’s really exciting that we are developing ways to explore our own solar system and we are developing instruments that can hopefully image some of the worlds around other stars and try to find out whether there’s any biology or technology going on there.GAZETTE: Do you think that will happen in your lifetime?TARTER: Well, let’s see. Back in 2004, [genetic scientists] Craig Venter and Daniel Cohen made a very bold prediction. They said whereas the 20th century had been the century of physics, the 21st century was going to be the century of biology. I personally think that wasn’t bold enough. I think the 21st century is going to be the century of biology on Earth and beyond. I think this will be a century when we begin to understand whether or not life has originated within the solar system more than once, and perhaps around other stars.GAZETTE: You talked about giving your listeners homework. My colleague mentioned to me an app that you could download to your computer that would help search for intelligent life while the machine slept.TARTER: That’s right. It was called [email protected] and it was developed at UC Berkeley. It’s still going. It processes data that has been recorded at the Arecibo and Green Bank observatories. It runs as a background process on your computer and it really put citizen science and distributed computing on the map when it came out about 12 years ago. It didn’t invent distributed computing — people were already doing that to break codes or factor prime numbers. But it was such a sexy application that everybody grabbed it and it took off and citizen science followed in its footsteps. It’s a very large group of people who classify galaxies, who fold proteins for cancer research, who count craters on various pieces of real estate in the solar system.GAZETTE: You famously disagreed with Stephen Hawking when he said that he feared the potentially aggressive nature of any intelligent life we might one day encounter.TARTER: Stephen was a brilliant man, but neither of us has any data on this point other than our own terrestrial history. My point of view is the kind of scenario that’s being posited is that they are going to show up and do us harm. Well, if they can get here, their technology is far more advanced than ours, and I don’t know how you get to be an advanced older technology and have a long history unless you outgrow the aggression that probably helped you to get smart in the first place. So, I think an old technology, if such a thing exists, is going to be stable and it’s going to have gone through the kind of cultural evolution, the kind of social evolution that [Harvard Professor] Steven Pinker talks about. So, from my point of view, if they are coming from an older technology and can get here, they don’t have bad intentions. It doesn’t mean that the interaction will be rosy, because there are often unintended consequences.GAZETTE: Final question: “Contact” excluded, favorite alien or space movie?TARTER: Oh, I like “2001: A Space Odyssey.”Interview was edited for clarity and length. The scope of TESS NASA-backed scientists hope project advances plans to search moons for extraterrestrial life Related Launching a space mission from the deepest oceancenter_img Harvard astronomer Latham set for lead role in exoplanet mission Harvard Medical School grad to depart residency for astronaut training Theremin player sets history lesson to music, without the slightest touch Behind an eerie sound, science, espionage, and dashed dreamslast_img read more

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KPK urged to take on Novel’s acid attack case after prosecutors demand light sentence

first_imgFormer Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) commissioners have urged the antigraft body to take on the prosecution of the alleged attackers of senior investigator Novel Baswedan after the current prosecution demanded notably light sentences for the defendants.Prosecutors are seeking one year of prison for the two police officers, Chief Brig. Ronny Bugis and Brig. Rahmat Kadir Mahulette, who are standing trial for their alleged involvement in an acid attack on Novel in April 2017.The prosecutors said the defendants had “accidentally” thrown sulfuric acid in the investigator’s face. He urged current KPK commissioners to pressure the government to address the acid attack case more seriously, citing several suspicious occurrences during the investigation. Abraham pointed out that the police had taken three years to find the suspects, even though both suspects were active police officers.Commission for Missing Persons and Victims of Violence (Kontras) coordinator Yati Andriyani, who is also part of Novel’s legal team, said investigators had not summoned Novel’s three neighbors, who were key witnesses in the case.They said they had witnessed people preparing a liquid before throwing it on Novel and scouting around Novel’s house prior to the attack.Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) investigator Novel Baswedan arrives at the Jakarta Police headquarters on Dec. 6, 2019. (JP/Seto Wardhana)She also noted the fact that the defendants’ legal team was led by National Police law division head Insp. Gen. Rudy Heriyanto Adi Nugroho, who served as the Jakarta Police’s general crime division head during the investigation of the acid attack in April 2017.“He investigated the case, but now he is acting as the defendant’s legal representative. The conflict of interest is obvious,” said Yati.She said the KPK should open an obstruction of justice case against the defendants, as the National Commission on Human Rights’ (Komnas HAM) 2018 investigation concluded that the attack was related to Novel’s work as KPK investigator.The 2001 Anticorruption Law stipulates that obstruction of justice or obstruction of the work of graft busters can carry up to 12 years of prison.Read also: House to question attorney general on ‘light’ sentence sought for suspects in Novel caseNovel had previously told the courtroom that he believed the acid attack was related to his work on certain high-profile corruption cases, including a bribery case pertaining to beef imports that implicated former Constitutional Court justice Patrialis Akbar and an e-ID corruption case that implicated former House of Representatives speaker Setya Novanto.Former commissioner Saut Situmorang said the KPK leaders at that time had considered a plan to launch an obstruction of justice investigation pertaining to the attack on Novel. However, they decided to wait for further developments in the police investigation, especially the establishment of the perpetrators’ motives.Abraham urged the government to take action despite President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo’s statement that he would not intervene in the ongoing legal proceedings.“The President is the commander-in-chief of the country’s law enforcement. He should be serious in directing the enforcement of this case because it has deviated from the right path.”Topics : Abraham Samad, who led the antigraft body between 2011 and 2015, criticized current KPK chairman Firli Bahuri for his recent statement saying the ongoing legal process should be respected.The former chairman said KPK leaders should take responsibility and act on the case as the acid attack was not simply a personal attack against Novel.“This was an attack against the corruption eradication agenda as well as the institution itself,” Abraham said during a discussion on Friday.Read also: Lawyers seek acquittal in Novel acid attack caselast_img read more

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Negredo completes Valencia switch

first_img City paid £20million to bring the forward from Sevilla last summer after his previous spells with Real Madrid’s ‘B’ team and Almeria. The Primera Division club issued a statement that read: “Valencia Football Club has reached an agreement with Manchester City Football Club for the loan, with an option to compulsory purchase, the Spanish international striker Alvaro Negredo, considered one of the best attackers of the national and European football. “The footballer with Valencian family, will be presented tomorrow at the Mestalla. The club invites all Valencianistas to attend the presentation.” Negredo scored 23 goals in his first season with City, including hat-tricks against CSKA Moscow in the Champions League and West Ham in the Capital One Cup. Nicknamed ‘the Beast’, he formed a formidable partnership with Aguero in the early part of the 2013-14 campaign, but his importance to the side waned after suffering a shoulder injury. Indeed, his last City goal came in January and he went 16 matches without finding the net at the end of the title-winning season. City, confirming the move, wrote on their website: ” Alvaro Negredo has joined Valencia on a season-long deal. “In total, Negredo played on 49 occasions for City, scoring 23 goals, two of which were hat-tricks. “La Liga side Valencia have an obligation to purchase the Spain international at the end of the loan period and everybody at Manchester City wishes Alavaro every success in the future.” Manchester City striker Alvaro Negredo has completed an initial loan move to Valencia. The deal with Valencia includes an obligation for Los Che to buy the player, who is currently out with a broken foot, at the end of the season. The 29-year-old impressed in what proved to be his only season in Manchester, but was reportedly keen to return to his homeland, leaving City manager Manuel Pellegrini with Sergio Aguero, Edin Dzeko and Stevan Jovetic as his options in attack. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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