Limerick students from all over the county attend Limerick for Engineering…

first_imgTwitter 1 of 6 Paschal Meehan, Dean, Work Based Learning, Vice President of International Engagement and Chairperson of Limerick for Engineering described this year’s showcase as exceptional, attracting the largest ever number of attendees.“Limerick for Engineering is a unique collaboration between industry and education which  informs the next generation of engineers. The industry displays at this year’s showcase were interactive and informative and generated great interest among those who attended.” said Mr Meehan.Barry O’Sullivan, General Manager, Johnson & Johnson Vision & President of the American Chamber of Commerce Ireland said the Mid West Limerick for Engineering Showcase demonstrated the various interesting and exciting careers in engineering available throughout the region.“The key contributor to the success of established companies in the region has been the availability of engineering graduates from the regional education and training institutions including the Limerick Institute of Technology (LIT), University of Limerick (UL),  and the Limerick Clare Education and Training Board (LCETB)” Mr. O’Sullivan said.Following on the success of the this year’s event the fifth Mid West Limerick for Engineering Showcase 2018 will return to Shannon Airport in 2019.More about education here. Pictured at the Limerick For Engineering event, Shannon Airport were, Sinead O’Regan, Molex and Patrick Molloy, Crescent Comp Limerick. Picture: Alan Place Pictured at the Limerick For Engineering event, Shannon Airport were, Conor Foster , Crecora National School with Clodagh Somers, Cook Medical. Picture: Alan Place Pictured at the Limerick For Engineering event, Shannon Airport were, Morad and Mohamed Bashir Sati. Picture: Alan Place Picture: Alan Place NewsEducationLimerick students from all over the county attend Limerick for Engineering ShowcaseBy Staff Reporter – March 13, 2018 2812 Urgent action needed to ensure Regional Air Connectivity WhatsApp Pictured at the Limerick For Engineering event, Shannon Airport were, UL students, Rebecca Clarke, Zara Madden and Jane Marslan with Megan Moloney, Croom Precision Medical. Picture: Alan Place Print Picture: Alan PlacePrimary and secondary school students from all parts of county Limerick were among the one thousand who attended Mid West Limerick for Engineering Showcase 2018 at Shannon Airport on Thursday last.The event which had been postponed one week due to Storm Emma, also attracted parents of school going children, teachers, career guidance councillors and those curious about the ever developing world of engineering.In its fourth year, this free showcase is the brainchild of the Limerick for Engineering consortium – an industry led collaboration between 30 leading companies in the mid west and the region’s education providers. Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSJohnson & JohnsonLimerick for Engineering ShowcaseLimerick Institute of TechnologyShannon airportStorm EmmastudentsUniversity of Limerick Shannon Airport “has been abandoned” Email Advertisement Previous articleEastway Remote Monitoring Ltd secure win in Limerick final of the National Enterprise AwardsNext articleCroí Glas to launch fun filled event on St. Patricks Day Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up During the three hour event, students engaged with the companies (indigenous and multi national); viewed the most cutting edge technologies, witnessed demonstrations by full time engineers, and learned first hand about the multiple career opportunities available in the Mid West to young people with an interest in engineering.Staff and students from Limerick Institute of Technology, the University of Limerick, the Limerick, Clare ETB and Griffith College were on hand to outline the various courses and routes that are available to students wishing to pursue a career in the engineering field. Pictured at the Limerick For Engineering event, Shannon Airport were, Sean McGuinness, Regeneron and Aaron Kelly, Crescent Comprehensive Limerick. Picture: Alan Place Aer Lingus needs to clarify Shannon plans – Crowe Sad day for Limerick and Mid-West following Aer Lingus announcement – Mayor Michael Collins One of the world’s most unusual aircraft arrives at Shannon Airport Linkedin Limerick’s Student Radio Station Wired FM Celebrates 25 Years on Airlast_img read more

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Suspect in sergeant’s slaying now charged in killing of federal officer in Oakland: Officials

first_imgSanta Cruz County Sheriff’s Office(SANTA CRUZ, Calif.) — BY: EMILY SHAPIRO and LUKE BARRSteven Carrillo, the man suspected of killing a Santa Cruz, California, sheriff’s sergeant this month, has now been charged in the May slaying of a federal officer in Oakland, authorities announced Tuesday.Authorities had said earlier they were investigating possible links between the two shootings.Carrillo, a 32-year-old active duty Air Force sergeant, was first arrested for allegedly gunning down Santa Cruz Sheriff’s Sgt. Damon Gutzwiller in Ben Lomond, California, on June 6.Gutzwiller, a 38-year-old husband and father, had been responding to a call about a suspicious van and saw someone with guns and bomb-making devices, sheriff’s officials said.The van driver fled, and when deputies tried to follow, they were ambushed with gunfire and multiple improvised explosives, officials said. Gutziller was killed and another officer was injured.Carrillo allegedly carjacked residents at gunpoint before he was captured, sheriff’s officials said.On Tuesday, David Anderson, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California, announced that Carrillo is accused of killing Patrick Underwood about one week before Gutzwiller was killed.On the night of May 29, Underwood, a 53-year-old federal law enforcement officer, was shot dead while providing security at a federal building in Oakland, near a Black Lives Matter protest. A second officer was shot and survived.The FBI launched a manhunt and released photos of the van they believed the shooter was driving. Authorities said Tuesday they believe the same van was used in the Oakland and Ben Lomond shootings.Carrillo allegedly shot Underwood while his alleged accomplice, Robert Justus Jr., 30, drove the van, Anderson said.FBI Special Agent in Charge of the San Francisco field office, John Bennett, said Tuesday, “We believe Carrillo and Justus chosen this date because the planned protest in Oakland provided an opportunity for them to target multiple law enforcement personnel.”“They came to Oakland to kill cops,” he said.Oakland interim police chief Susan Manheimer said over 500 officers were on the ground in the city.Authorities also claim Carrillo used “his own blood” to write phrases associated with the Boogaloo movement on a car he allegedly carjacked.“The ‘Boogaloo’ term is used by extremists to reference a violent uprising or impeding war in the United States,” Anderson said.Carrillo is charged with murder and attempted murder while Justus, who was arrested June 11, is charged with aiding and abetting, prosecutors said. Carrillo also faces state charges in the Gutzwiller case.Justus made his initial appearance Monday and is due to return to court Friday. Carrillo has not entered a plea for the state charges and has not yet appeared in federal court.Last week, while the search for Underwood’s killer was ongoing, Underwood’s sister, Angela Underwood Jacobs, testified at the House Judiciary Committee hearing on police reform.“Patrick was a good man who only wanted to help others and keep his community safe,” she testified.“I want to ensure the memory of my brother, Patrick, is a catalyst against injustice, intolerance and violence of any kind,” she said. “Please do not let my brother Patrick’s name go in vain.” Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Once ridiculed for playing flashy, Nicole Levy’s creativity has ‘changed the way people rip it’

first_imgLevy’s six cousins, all boys, molded her complicated moves and innovative shots. She didn’t watch women’s lacrosse until she was a sophomore in high school. Instead, Levy was put in a local boys lacrosse summer camp at 4 years old. She treaded the sidelines of Steve’s over-35 tournaments in Lake Placid. And when her cousins tagged along, they’d challenge other team’s younger siblings. In most cases, she was the only girl around. “I think as soon as I touched the ball once, I had proved myself,” Levy said. Her natural tendency to play below-the-shoulders soon became a point of criticism by Levy’s old program director, a rival of Steve’s in Long Island. When Steve got light of this, he simply responded: “I’m not going to make her play any other way.”By her sophomore year of high school, the reactions were still mixed. During one camp, she almost got in trouble for going behind the back. Then, the next weekend, players lined up and practiced sidearm one-by-one, trying to emulate their teammate. Levy’s play was not only welcomed, but praised by one of the sport’s greatest players in Gait. In the middle of a game her senior year, a referee approached Steve and told him that some opposing players had asked him to make Levy stop shooting so hard. “Yeah, I just laughed,” Steve said. While Levy’s trick shots dazzled, the outside shot became a staple of her game around that time. Standing at 5-foot-2, she started to rip from eight, sometimes from 10 or 12 yards, because she couldn’t blow by her defenders like some midfielders. Levy needed to compensate for “not being that fast,” she said.“It was kind of electrifying,” Steve said about her outside shot. “It’s the perfect storm.”But, as a freshman, the attack who played primarily behind the goal wasn’t a centerpiece anymore — Kayla Treanor, Syracuse’s leading career-goal scorer, held that spot. Levy’s game was still unconventional, even in the college ranks, and the shy freshman didn’t know if it would translate.Amy Nakamura | Co-Digital EditorThat uneasiness was erased on one play midway through her first season. The ball rotated to Levy against Albany on a skip pass, and instead of finding a cutter, Levy darted toward the eight-meter. Steve and associate head coach Regy Thorpe remember being in awe of the velocity of her underhanded shot. Two steps outside of the eight, she hit nylon.“Everything hit there,” Levy said. “I’m thinking ‘Yeah, I’m an outside shooter. I can play like a guy.’ I can bring this aspect of men’s lacrosse into the women’s game and kind of change the game a little bit.”An emulation of a Final Four team her freshman year wouldn’t come into fruition in her sophomore and junior season. Syracuse was in the midst of a rebuild with Levy at the crux of it until this season. Levy would still make highlight-reel plays, and her style wasn’t questioned like it was in high school.She entered 2019 coming off a 41-goal season, second-most on SU, but in September an injury to her peroneal tendon caused Levy to get three screws in her ankle. As of a month ago, she’s now dealing with plantar fasciitis in her heel. The patented rips from the eight-meter are more of a rarity and, in turn, it has hampered her scoring abilities, Steve said.Now, Levy calls herself a “feeder and a leader.” She leads the Orange in assists (26). And when opponents switch their coverages or leave someone uncovered, she’s the first to call it out. It’s a new role, she said, and she’s OK with it.Up a player against Virginia in the first round of the ACC tournament, Levy shuffled onto the field. Men’s teams usually send their “man-up squad” always with one “big shooter” — Levy’s eager to point out that on this play, it was her. The ball floated around the net, and freshman Megan Carney, who was behind the goal, flipped it to an open Levy.There was a cutter in the middle. Levy had space to run. But that’s not who she is. One step, then two. A long angle, eight meters from the net aiming for the top right. An underhanded follow-through turned into a stick-drop and an embrace with Gait. “When Nicole stormed onto the scene her freshman year ripping it from outside, she had a lot of young players in the world doing the low-to-high,” Thorpe said. “She’s certainly changed the way people rip it now.”Jordan Phelps | Staff Photographer Published on May 5, 2019 at 10:10 pm Contact KJ: [email protected] | @KJEdelman Comments Nicole Levy knew her underhanded passes were a bit flashy. She admits she liked the attention that came with every dish. Walking off the field after a youth lacrosse tournament in ninth grade, someone approached Levy about them. Those passes, the ones praised her entire life, were seen as a selfish act.Sometimes, her cutting teammates couldn’t catch those passes, even if they hit their sticks. The person blamed Levy and said she should adjust her game. But Levy didn’t listen.Her style of play, a resemblance of the qualities praised in men’s lacrosse, was being labeled as unconventional. The teenager walked away in tears, and her father Steve followed trying to reassure her.“He’s like ‘Don’t listen to them, keep being you, eventually it’s going to pay off,’” Levy said. “And it has, so he was right.”Other than her father, SU head coach Gary Gait was one of the first to support the high schooler’s creative play, and Levy has brought it with her to Syracuse. The style that’s put her on SportsCenter. The style that’s been face-guarded on the defensive end and mimicked on the other. And the one that’s changed the game for “big shooters” with behind-the-back repertoires. As the senior nears the end of her illustrious four-year career at Syracuse this month, Levy plans on becoming a collegiate coach — one that doesn’t hinder creativity, but embraces it.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“That’s just how I play,” Levy said. “If people are going to praise that then that’s great. If not, too bad, because it works.” Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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