Meet Miss Teen TCI contestants

first_imgAmber Hall – 19 year old Amber Hall will be representing Providenciales; her platform is to promote and expand art in the community and schools in TCI. Amber says she joined the Miss Teen TCI pageant to gain experience, increase her knowledge and to build her self confidence and self esteem. Arielle NeelyArielle is 16 years old and will be representing North Caicos. Arielle says she joined the pageant to meet new friends and learn more about herself. Arielle’s platform is aimed at helping young ladies by promoting self love and self confidence. Gessica Williams15 year old Gessica Williams will be representing Middle Caicos in the Miss Teen TCI pageant; her platform aims to shed light on illegal drugs and how it affects the community. Gessica says she always knew that she would be a pageant girl, which is her main reason for joining the competition.Later we feature the final two contestants of Miss Teen TCI 2015-2016 – Leanndra Pratt and Shanise Laurant. Related Items:Miss teen tci Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for you Results in for 2nd Miss Teen TCI; called a close contestcenter_img Busy holiday weekend Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 25 Sept 2015 – The countdown is on now to coronation day for the ‘fierce five,’ after a showcase in float parade and at the Island Fish Fry on Thursday evening. Today, the teens will have their preliminary interviews and the final competition and crowning is set for Saturday at Brayton Hall. Let’s meet three of the contestants; Amber Hall, Arielle Neely and Gessica Williams. Teen TCI Pageant this weekend; events start at Fish Frylast_img read more

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San Diego blues legend Tomcat Courtney discusses his journey and 90th birthday

first_imgSan Diego blues legend Tomcat Courtney discusses his journey and 90th birthday bash January 7, 2019 Updated: 8:50 PM Posted: January 7, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – One of San Diego’s greatest blues legends, Tomcat Courtney, joined KUSI to discuss his journey and a special birthday bash coming up.Tomcat Courtney’s 90th Birthday Blues Party will be a Texas Style BBQ Buffet with some of Tom’s favorites dishes.General Admission (First Come First Served Seating with buffet) is $30 and Vip Admission (Vip Reserved Seating and buffet) is $50.The birthday bash will be at Ramada Inn, 5550 Kearny Mesa Road, San Diego, 92111, on January 24 from 6 P.M.- 10 P.M..Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tomcat-courtneys-90th-birthday-celebration-tickets-54128074528?aff=ebdssbdestsearch center_img KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Entertainment, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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ADC Launches Initiative to Recognize Community Support for Service Members Military Families

first_imgADC and the Defense Communities Caucus are rolling out a new initiative to recognize up to 10 communities annually for providing outstanding support to service members and military families.The Great American Defense Communities program is intended to acknowledge the unique contributions cities, counties and regions that host installations make to improve quality of life for service members, veterans and their families. Candidates will be selected based on the broad range of efforts they carry out on behalf of military personnel and their families, covering areas such as education, job opportunities, housing, family support during deployments and community appreciation.“There perhaps is no greater champion of a defense installation than its host community,” said ADC CEO Tim Ford. “The Great American Defense Communities program will share positive stories about the exemplary efforts being made in communities to support defense installations and their personnel.”The program will use local and national press events, exhibits in Congress and the Pentagon, and recognition during ADC events to highlight the successful initiatives being employed by defense communities to support the nation’s military men and women.A panel of defense community advocates and experts will review the nominations and select up to 10 honorees as Great American Defense Communities. Winners will be announced at the ADC Installation Innovation Forum in February 2016.Nominations are due Feb. 11. Applications are available on the ADC website.“I believe the communities who support our military installations across the country deserve recognition for the important role they play,” said Sen. Jerry Moran (R-Kan.), co-chair of the Senate Defense Communities Caucus. “In Kansas, we’re grateful to the communities that love and care for the soldiers at Fort Riley and Fort Leavenworth, the airmen at McConnell Air Force Base and Forbes Field, and the Kansans in the National Guard and Reserve.”“America is strongest when communities and military installations work together to bolster national security while creating jobs and strengthening their states,” said Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.), a founder and current co-chair of the Senate Defense Communities Caucus. “In North Dakota, defense communities like those in Minot and Grand Forks lead the country in building public-private partnerships that support service members and their families, and help the entire community grow and thrive. The Association of Defense Communities will honor exceptional communities through this program, and I encourage defense communities in my state and beyond to pursue this distinction.”“Service members and their families are an important part of every community in the United States,” said Rep. Sam Farr (D-Calif.), a founder and current co-chair of the House Defense Communities Caucus. “My district has a proud history of military service that dates back to the Spanish arrival to the Monterey Peninsula, continued through the legacy of Fort Ord and survives today with the presence of Fort Hunter Liggett, the Naval Postgraduate School and the Defense Language Institute. These institutions help strengthen our community and I am excited to join in launching this program to honor the rest of America’s Great Defense Communities.”“Our close-knit communities around Fort Leavenworth, Forbes Field and Fort Riley deserve appreciation for the great work they do to help our troops, and their families, and I look forward to sharing their stories as part of the Great American Defense Communities program,” said Rep. Lynn Jenkins (R-Kan.), a founder and current co-chair of the House Defense Communities Caucus. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

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Nanoinfused ceramic could report on its own health

first_imghttps://news-network.rice.edu/news/files/2019/01/0128_CERAMIC-1-WEB-2khpzam.jpgCeramics with networked nanosheets of graphene and white graphene would have the unique ability to alter their electrical properties when strained, according to a researcher at Rice University. The surprising ability could lead to new types of structural sensors. (Credit: Rouzbeh Shahsavari/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,962 undergraduates and 3,027 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis Rouzbeh Shahsavari Return to article. Long DescriptionCeramics with networked nanosheets of graphene and white graphene would have the unique ability to alter their electrical properties when strained, according to a researcher at Rice University. The surprising ability could lead to new types of structural sensors. Illustration by Rouzbeh ShahsavariUnder elastic strain, the internal structure of a material stretched like a rubber band does not change. But the same material under plastic strain — caused in this case by stretching it far enough beyond elasticity to deform — distorts its crystalline lattice. GBN, it turns out, shows different electrical properties in each case, making it a worthy candidate as a structural sensor.Shahsavari had already determined that hexagonal-boron nitride – aka white graphene – can improve the properties of ceramics. He and his colleagues have now discovered that adding graphene makes them even stronger and more versatile, along with their surprising electrical properties.The magic lies in the ability of two-dimensional, carbon-based graphene and white graphene to bond with each other in a variety of ways, depending on their relative concentrations. Though graphene and white graphene naturally avoid water, causing them to clump, the combined nanosheets easily disperse in a slurry during the ceramic’s manufacture. Return to article. Long DescriptionRouzbeh ShahsavariThe resulting ceramics, according to the authors’ theoretical models, would become tunable semiconductors with enhanced elasticity, strength and ductility.The research led by Shahsavari and Asghar Habibnejad Korayem, an assistant professor of structural engineering at Iran University of Science and Technology and a research fellow at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, appears in the American Chemical Society journal Applied Materials and Interfaces.Graphene is a well-studied form of carbon known for its lack of a band gap – the region an electron has to leap to make a material conductive. With no band gap, graphene is a metallic conductor. White graphene, with its wide band gap, is an insulator. So the greater the ratio of graphene in the 2D compound, the more conductive the material will be.Mixed into the ceramic in a high enough concentration, the 2D compound dubbed GBN would form a network as conductive as the amount of carbon in the matrix allows. That gives the overall composite a tunable band gap that could lend itself to a variety of electrical applications.“Fusing 2D materials like graphene and boron nitride in ceramics and cements enables new compositions and properties we can’t achieve with either graphene or boron nitride by themselves,” Shahsavari said.The team used density functional theory calculations to model variations of the 2D compound mixed with tobermorite, a calcium silicate hydrate material commonly used as cement for concrete. They determined the oxygen-boron bonds formed in the ceramic would turn it into a p-type semiconductor.Tobermorite by itself has a large band gap of about 4.5 electron volts, but the researchers calculated that when mixed with GBN nanosheets of equal parts graphene and white graphene, that gap would shrink to 0.624 electron volts.When strained in the elastic regime, the ceramic’s band gap dropped, making the material more conductive, but when stretched beyond elasticity — that is, in the plastic regime — it became less conductive. That switch, the researchers said, makes it a promising material for self-sensing and structural health monitoring applications.The researchers suggested other 2D sheets with molybdenum disulfide, niobium diselenide or layered double hydroxides may provide similar opportunities for the bottom-up design of tunable, multifunctional composites. “This would provide a fundamental platform for cement and concrete reinforcement at their smallest possible dimension,” Shahsavari said.Co-authors of the paper are graduate students Ehsan Hosseini and Mohammad Zakertabrizi of the Iran University of Science and Technology. The National Science Foundation and the Australian Research Council supported the research.-30-Read the abstract at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.8b19409Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:White graphene makes ceramics multifunctional: http://news.rice.edu/2018/01/11/white-graphene-makes-ceramics-multifunctional-2/Multiscale Materials Laboratory (Shahsavari Lab): http://rouzbeh.rice.edu/Asghar Habibnejad Korayem: http://www.iust.ac.ir/content/40345/Dr.-Habibnejad-Korayem,-AsgharGeorge R. Brown School of Engineering: http://engineering.rice.eduRice Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering: www.ceve.rice.eduRice Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering: https://msne.rice.eduImage for download: Ceramics with networked nanosheets of graphene and white graphene would have the unique ability to alter their electrical properties when strained, according to a researcher at Rice University. The surprising ability could lead to new types of structural sensors. (Credit: Rouzbeh Shahsavari/Rice University) ShareNEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: A link to a high-resolution image for download appears at the end of this release.David [email protected] [email protected] ceramic could report on its own healthRice University-led simulations show unique ceramic could act as a sensor for structuresHOUSTON – (Feb. 5, 2019) – A ceramic that becomes more electrically conductive under elastic strain and less conductive under plastic strain could lead to a new generation of sensors embedded into structures like buildings, bridges and aircraft able to monitor their own health.The electrical disparity fostered by the two types of strain was not obvious until Rice University’s Rouzbeh Shahsavari, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and of materials science and nanoengineering, and his colleagues modeled a novel two-dimensional compound, graphene-boron-nitride (GBN). Ceramics with networked nanosheets of graphene and white graphene would have the unique ability to alter their electrical properties when strained, according to a researcher at Rice University. The surprising ability could lead to new types of structural sensors. (Credit: Rouzbeh Shahsavari/Rice University) Return to article. Long Descriptionlast_img read more

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