What a freshman sees

first_imgJasper Johnston may sound like a character in an F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, but he’s a real-life Harvard College freshman with a modern eye for the beauty of the University’s campus. Armed with no more than his iPhone and its native photo editing app, Johnston has been documenting his first semester as a Harvard student on his Instagram account aptly titled “100 Days of Harvard.”“It came from the idea of the first 100 days in political office or a job being really crucial and important. I had never actually had an Instagram account, and originally I kept my photos to myself. I didn’t tell anyone except my family because I wanted the work to speak for itself … At about the halfway mark, I started posting to Facebook because I realized I’d put more work into it than I’d intended.”Johnson has snapped a photo on campus each day days since August 23, 2016. Photo by Sarah SilbigerIt was those first few shares that prompted the University’s official Instagram account to begin following Johnston’s account and sharing his photos. Even though he uses only his iPhone, it’s clear that photography is more than a casual hobby for the social sciences concentrator. Just a cursory look through “100 Days of Harvard” reveals a deep passion for nature and architecture.“Originally I was looking at documenting my journey and my classes. When I got here I was just so inspired by the buildings and surroundings. Usually I love soft shapes, like clouds and sunsets and trees. But here, [architecture] is what has been incorporated more into the photos because it’s what’s in the environment.” At his current pace, Johnston will post his 100th photo just in time for finals. As for what happens on day 101, Johnston is still struggling to find a good answer. He briefly toyed with the idea of turning the project into 365 Days of Harvard, but scratched it because he can’t be here year-round.“If it’s not cheating, I might restart when we get back in January. We’ve gone from this transition where we’ve had these leaves in the summer to fall and now no leaves. I’d like to see the reverse effect happen in the spring. ‘Another 100 Days of Harvard,’ just because.”With the attention of both Harvard and CBC Quebec, which has published the photographs, the incentive to tack on another 100 days — or perhaps 700 — is certainly there. “If not, I’ll just continue to take photos.”John Michael Baglione is a writer and author residing in Boston. His work can be found at johnmichaeltxt.com. For Johnston, the project is not simply about discovering his new home, but also about learning about his birthplace. Though he grew up outside of Victoria, British Columbia, Jasper was born in Cambridge and moved northwest as a young child. Now in a city twice as old, six times as populated, and on the opposite coast of his hometown, there is much for him to find and share with his followers, many just as curious as he is.“I love days where I can find a nice photo that’s not at all linear or geometric. But I’ve really appreciated — due to the square format of Instagram — the uniqueness of trying to cut the image exactly in half with the building so you get this nice contrast with the brick and the glass and then the trees on the other side of it.”As he garners a larger audience, Johnston has taken to polling his friends about which picture to use as each day’s photo. “Sometimes I only take one or two photos. Some days if I’m more inspired it’ll be more like 20 or 30,” though that usually makes it harder to choose the right photo. “The one rule I’ve set up for myself is that I have to post a photo that was taken that day.”last_img read more

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Duncan Hall hosts golf tournament

first_imgAfter weeks of preparation, Duncan Hall will host its first campus-wide golf tournament, The Duncan Classic, the weekend of April 13th and 14th. The nine-hole competition will include separate chipping and putting challenges. Sophomore Michael O’Brien, a Duncan Hall resident, said he saw the potential for an individual golf tournament for the Notre Dame community when coming up with a plan. “Josh Whelan started a new tradition in Duncan Hall, the Duncan blazer, and I loved the idea,” he said. “Duncan was in need of a new dorm event, and I was inspired by Josh’s idea and our location by the Notre Dame Golf Course.” O’Brien said he decided to combine the two ideas and the Duncan Classic was born. “This tournament is a way to spread the Duncan tradition with those who participate in and win the Duncan Classic,” he said.   The tournament will include separate men’s and women’s brackets, O’Brien said. Any students and faculty from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross may participate, but to keep the competition fair and to encourage more participation by amateur golfers, Division I golfers may not compete. The dorm also hopes to make the event more accessible by providing participants with necessary equipment. “Duncan Hall will provide all participants with a set of clubs, if needed, free of charge,” he said.   Those who participate will play on Saturday, and those who make the cut will compete in the next round on Championship Sunday where they will play in pairs instead of as a group of four. “You can sign up with your friends, but you are not guaranteed your Saturday foursome until all have officially registered on the Google form,” he said. The costs for participating will vary according to the event of choice. O’Brien said $10 will cover the cost of the nine-hole game. Competing in either the putting or chipping challenge will cost three dollars, and participating in both will cost a total of five dollars. Individuals who would like to do all three events can participate at a fee of $15. The preliminary men’s round will start from the white tees, while the women will start from the red tees, he said. On Championship Sunday, the men who advance will begin at the blue tees. All United States Golf Association (USGA) rules will apply throughout the competition, O’Brien said. “Tee times are available from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. all day Saturday, and you can see which tee times are available on an embedded link on the Google doc,” O’Brien said. “The best way to find the document and register is to search ‘Duncan Classic’ on Facebook, but you can also check the Week at ND email for the link.” O’Brien said the scoring system in place is individual stroke play, meaning the total number of shots taken on each hole will compose the final score. “Golf is a gentleman’s sport so we trust participants to record their scores individually and accurately,” he said. “However, there will be a large Duncan staff presence on the course. Any cheating will not be tolerated.” The competition will conclude with a green jacket ceremony, supplemented with refreshments in the Duncan courtyard. First, second and third place finishers for both the men’s and women’s teams will receive a gift card, O’Brien said. Awards will also be given to the top finishers in the putting, chipping, longest drive and closest pin challenges, O’Brien said. The man and woman who win the nine-hole tournament will each receive a blazer with the Duncan crest. “In future years it [the blazer] will have the Duncan Classic crest on it,” O’Brien said. Duncan will also award a plaque at the conclusion of the Classic which will go to each male and female winner’s dorm, department or college where it can be displayed until the start of the next Duncan Classic. “In a way, the plaque will immortalize the winner and their respective dorm, department, or college,” he said.   In the future, commissioners of the Duncan Classic hope to make the competition an annual event held on the first football bye weekend of the fall semester, beginning next fall, he said. “We want this tournament to be the Bookstore Basketball of golf,” O’Brien said. “The goal for this year was to get the tournament up and running, but in future years we hope to partner with the Bald and the Beautiful or another charity.” Contact Carolyn Hutyra at [email protected]last_img read more

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