Somerville’s dank memes

first_imgSomerville JCR last Sunday passed a motion mandating their secretary to include a “memes section” in their weekly notices.The college’s JCR voted by a majority of 23 to 3 in favour of including “exactly five of the dankest memes” as a part of the JCR notices, which are sent weekly to students by email and contain information about college life.The motion, tabled by Somerville JCR president Alex Crichton-Miller and seconded by secretary ‘KJ’ Kim, expressed the belief that students ought to be “encouraged to read the weekly notices”, resolving that this objective “may perhaps be achieved through memes”. The motion described the JCR notices in their previous form as “not fun, nor widely read”.In its final version, the motion invites students to submit memes either by email or over Facebook to the JCR secretary who will then select five, including one “top meme”, the proponent of which will be awarded a “prize of three bop juice tokens”. Students are limited to one volunteered meme per week and memes need not necessarily relate directly to Somerville.Questions over whether the introduction of memes to JCR literature will improve student involvement have divided students within the college.One second-year Biochemist at Somerville, who wished to remain anonymous, told Cherwell that the change will likely prove “a great way of increasing the readership of motions subsequent, as people will pay more attention, even if only for the memes”.However, this student added: “The idea that such a political college with so much attention to politics and ‘political correctness’ needs ‘dank memes’ to increase readers is ironic”, and was a sign that “most motions are irrelevant to the majority [of students]”.A second-year Somerville biologist told Cherwell that he was “surprised that [the JCR] want to use memes” since they “seem to get offended by anything”, suggesting that future memes might be a fresh source of “controversy”.“Hopefully it is a step towards the right direction, where, through memes, the people will eventually be able to throw off the yoke that the JCR offence-fanatic division holds over the institution.”Ada Pospiszyl, one of the administrators of Facebook page Oxford Dank Memes Society, told Cherwell: “If they were to be Somerville related memes then it would be a very effective way to get people to engage with college news – reading the secretary’s notices would help you create more relevant content.“It definitely isn’t a sign of dumbing down, quite the opposite. It’s not like there was ever a moment in the history of Oxford when people were genuinely interested in JCR politics, and introducing memes to the notices is a very clever way of potentially changing that and getting more people involved.”This sentiment was echoed by the Facebook meme-page Memebridge, who told Cherwell the move could “be useful to provide some element of political engagement, but only if done correctly.” They reflected further that while memes “do provide a way to get people talking about things they wouldn’t normally consider… the fact that memes are being seen as a way to get people talking about college things is probably a sign that people aren’t engaged in it enough.”last_img read more

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Space Buffs Make Contact With Discarded NASA Probe

Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A group of citizen scientists has commandeered a NASA spacecraft that was launched in 1978 and had gone unused since 1997.Today the group made first contact with the International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3) when the spacecraft acknowledged receiving a signal from the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, says Keith Cowing, co-director of the ISEE-3 Reboot Project, a group of about 20 volunteer space buffs. “We knew we could do this—it’s a vindication,” he says. “It’s sort of like reaching back in time to grab something that otherwise would have been lost.” Cowing says that the group is now getting telemetry data from the spacecraft. Over the coming days, they will try to understand the health of the spacecraft and its 13 scientific instruments. The spacecraft was launched to study space weather and is due to make a close pass around the moon.Next month, they plan to instigate a burn with the remaining fuel and move the spacecraft into a new orbit. Also in June, they plan to start communicating with ISEE-3 from a second radio telescope, a 21-meter dish at Morehead State University in Kentucky. This dish is more movable than the massive Arecibo telescope and can better track the spacecraft as it gets closer to Earth, Cowing says.The ISEE-3 Reboot Project raised more than $150,000 in crowd-funding to support its volunteer efforts. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) read more

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