Senior officials organise systematic suppression of dissenting voices

first_img to go further February 3, 2021 Find out more SyriaMiddle East – North Africa Receive email alerts Follow the news on Syria Organisation Damascus TV presenter arrested under cyber-crime law SyriaMiddle East – North Africa Related documents sites_censored until 15.09.09PDF – 431.18 KB March 12, 2021 Find out more What is happening to press freedom in Syria? It is hard to know because many journalists refuse to speak either on the record or anonymously for fear of being identified by the intelligence services. The few accounts emerging confirm that press freedom violations by the authorities have become systematic. Blogger Kareem Arbaji’s three-year jail sentence and the closure of journalist Mazen Darwich’s office on 13 September are the latest evidence.“Repression has been stepped up considerably since the start of the summer,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Under intelligence agency influence, the information ministry has been conducting a series of interrogations and arrests of human rights activists, lawyers and journalists.” The press freedom organisation added: “The journalists have been questioned about articles that are said to constitute ‘an attack on the nation’ or threaten ‘state security.’ The summonses and the closures of their offices have left them feeling confused and harassed.” A freelance journalist who heads the Syrian Centre for Media and Free Expression, Mazen Darwich said the closure of his office was carried out by intelligence officials accompanied by police, who confiscated all of its contents. “I received no warning or prior caution from the authorities,” he said in a press release. “These retaliatory measures confirm that attempts are being made to stifle press freedom and free expression (…) a systematic policy based on the violation of Syrian citizens’ constitutional rights and basic freedoms.”The Syrian Centre for Media and Free Expression is the country’s only NGO specialising in media issues, Internet access and media monitoring during election campaigns. Operating without a government permit, it has until now monitored violations of journalists’ rights. It recently took the lead in condemning the information minister’s bans on the dissemination of many newspapers and magazines.The blogger Kareem Arbaji received his three-year jail sentence on 13 September from the state security supreme court in Damascus on a charge of “publishing mendacious information liable to weaken the nation’s morale” under article 296 of the criminal code. Held in pre-trial detention for more than two years, ever since his arrest on 6 July 2007 by military intelligence officers, Arbaji used to help run Akhawia, an online forum where all kinds of subjects were discussed. The Arabic Network for Human Rights Information said it was what he posted online that prompted his arrest and conviction.The website of the Skeyes Centre, a Beirut-based NGO that defends press freedom and culture in the Middle East, became inaccessible to Syrian Internet users on 14 September, according to several sources in Syria.At the same time, the Syrian Centre for Media and Free Expression reported that the number of news and information websites blocked in Syria has increased to 241. They include 49 Kurdish sites, 35 opposition sites, 22 Lebanese sites, 15 human rights sites and nine cultural sites.The General Telecommunications Company and the Syrian Scientific Association for Information are jointly responsible for blocking websites inside Syria.The closure of Darwich’s office and Arbaji’s conviction are just the latest in a long list of recent press freedom violations in Syria.The Damascus bureau of the privately-owned satellite TV station Al Mashreq was arbitrarily closed by the security services on 29 July. The bureau of Alep, the third most popular TV station in Syria (after Al Sham and Al Dunia), was closed in a similar fashion a few days later. The station continues to broadcast but its journalists can no longer work in Syria.“This is a sad and strange situation,” the station’s production chief, Mohammed Abdel Rahim, told Reporters Without Borders. “No reason was given for this closure but that is not surprising.” Rahim left Damascus on 7 September after unsuccessful negotiations with the authorities in an attempt to get the bureau reopened.The authorities summoned most of Al Mashreq’s employees and ask them to sign statements that they no longer worked for Live Point, the company that is Al Mashreq’s biggest share-holder. The station’s modern programmes about the Syrian public day-to-day concerns had been a big success.On 13 August, information minister Mohsen Bilal announced that freelance journalist Ibrahim Al Jaban was banned from working for Syrian state satellite TV station Al Suriya and from producing any more the programmes in the Al ‘Alama Al Fariqa (Distinctive Feature) series. No reason was given.Al ‘Alama Al Fariqa’s distinctive feature was its host’s bold questions. The broadcasting of several of its episodes was delayed or banned. The last programme, on 7 August, consisted of an interview with Suleiman Haddad, the head of the Council of the People foreign relations committee and an old friend of Bilal’s.A Baath Party member, Haddad talked about the party’s past prior to 1970, when Hafez al-Assad became president, referring to the disputes between the late president and other party leaders such as Salah Jadid, who was jailed from 1970 until his death in 1994 and who never had access to the Syrian media. It was Bilal himself who banned the programme from being broadcast.“I do not know what motivated the minister’s decision to put an end to Al ‘Alama Al Fariqa,” Jaban said.Syria was ranked 159th out of 173 countries in the 2008 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index.See the list of blocked sites : Toll of ten years of civil war on journalists in Syria News Help by sharing this information March 8, 2021 Find out more News Wave of Kurdish arrests of Syrian journalists RSF_en News News September 15, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Senior officials organise systematic suppression of dissenting voiceslast_img read more

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Schools, shrines shut in Iraq’s Najaf over coronavirus

first_imgVisitors, including millions of Iranians, kiss and caress the tomb, making the area especially vulnerable to contamination.Amid the growing alarm, students remained at home on Tuesday after schools and universities temporarily closed their doors.”The 1,028 schools in Najaf province have closed following the detection of the first novel coronavirus case,” said a spokesman for the province’s education department.The health ministry said this would remain the case for at least 10 days.Najaf is home to the Wadi al-Salam (Valley of Peace) cemetery, the world’s largest, where millions of people from Iraq’s Shiite majority are buried.The health ministry on Tuesday advised against non-essential travel to Najaf and urged citizens to refrain from holding large gatherings.Inside the city, life has come to a stand-still, according an AFP correspondent.The few that brave the streets seek out pharmacies to purchase disinfectants and medical masks which have become more expensive and increasingly difficult to find.”There have been no masks for two days. How will I protect my children and my wife,” laments Hussam al-Khafaji, 29. “Either there are no masks or they sell at four dollars,” nearly four times the price before the outbreak, he told AFP from outside a pharmacy in central Najaf.With most people staying indoors, the main anti-government protest camp in Najaf was left nearly deserted.Demonstrators, who had gathered there daily since rallies in the capital and the south began in October, refrained from protesting over fears of a coronavirus outbreak among their ranks.  Shrines have shuttered, streets are deserted and schools closed in Iraq’s holy city of Najaf, where only pharmacies draw crowds after a novel coronavirus case triggered widespread panic.Najaf is popular among Shiite Muslim pilgrims from Iran, which has recorded 15 deaths from COVID-19, the highest death toll outside China, the epidemic’s epicenter.It is also where Iraq confirmed its first novel coronavirus infection in an Iranian national studying in a Shiite seminary in the city, located around 200 kilometers from Baghdad. Topics :center_img Since he was diagnosed on Monday, authorities have beefed up precautionary measures.Thirteen students who attended the same seminary school as the patient are being checked for the virus, Najaf governor Louai al-Yasseri told AFP.In an exceptionally rare move, religious officials on Tuesday closed down the Imam Ali mausoleum in Najaf, allowing visitors access only to its surroundings.The mausoleum where the Prophet Mohammed’s son-in-law is buried is one of the holiest sites for Shiite Muslims and is frequented yearly by millions of pilgrims.last_img read more

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Hollie leads team title defence at Fairhaven

first_img International Hollie Muse will be targeting a team action replay when she represents England Golf in the Nations Cup event at this weekend’s Fairhaven Trophies. The 15-year-old from Lancashire was in last year’s winning team, pipping another England trio on countback, while yet another England team finished in third place. This year Muse (Image © Leaderboard Photography) defends the team title with new partners, George Gardner of Sussex and Toby Briggs of Norfolk. England Golf is entering four teams in the event, played over the first two rounds of the 72-hole championship at Fairhaven Golf Club, Lancashire, which takes place from Friday to Sunday, 1-3 May. The other teams are: Team Two: Rhys Nevin-Wharton of Cheshire; Max Martin of Warwickshire and Emma Allen of Hampshire Team Three: Oliver Clarke of Lancashire; Billy Spooner of Lincolnshire; Eloise Healey of Lancashire Team Four: Charlie Strickland of Sussex; Jake Benson of Nottinghamshire; Lizzie Prior of Surrey The players Team One Hollie Muse, 15, (West Lancashire) helped England win the 2014 women’s and girls’ Home Internationals. She has just won the Scottish U16 girls’ open stroke play and The Leveret. George Gardner, 18, (Castle Royle) won the individual title at last year’s Canadian International Junior Challenge and also led England to team victory. Toby Briggs, 15, (Dunston Hall) helped England to a clean sweep in last year’s U16 internationals against the other home countries. Team Two Rhys Nevin-Wharton, 17, (Sandiway) was the runner-up in last year’s Daily Telegraph Junior championship. Max Martin, 17, (Ladbrook Park) represented Warwickshire at last year’s men’s County Finals and was third boy at the 2014 Fairhaven Trophies. Emma Allen, 18, (Meon Valley) helped England win the 2014 Girls’ Home Internationals and Hampshire to become women’s County Final champions. Team Three Oliver Clarke, 16, (Hillside) was in England’s winning team at the Canadian International Junior Challenge and was third in the English U16 boys’ championship for the MacGregor Trophy. Billy Spooner, 17, (Woodhall Spa) first represented England in 2012 and contributed to last year’s successful U16 campaign against the other home nations. Eloise Healey, 17, (West Lancashire) was fourth in the recent Delamere Comboy Scratch and shared 10th place at last weekend’s Helen Holm Scottish stroke play. Team Four Charlie Strickland, 15 (Ham Manor) was fifth in this season’s Peter McEvoy Trophy and sixth in the 2014 Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters. Jake Benson, 15, (Beeston Fields), contributed to England’s clean sweep in last year’s U16 internationals against the other home countries. Lizzie Prior, 17, (Burhill) was in England’s winning team at last year’s Girls’ Home Internationals, after finishing third in the English girls’ championship. 30 Apr 2015 Hollie leads team title defence at Fairhaven last_img read more

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Ex-Nelsonite Sookro sinks Leafs in overtime

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsFor the second consecutive night a player with ties to the Heritage City came back to haunt the Nelson Leafs.Nelson Minor Hockey grad Ryon Sookro scored early in overtime to power the visiting Beaver Valley Nitehawks to a 2-1 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over the Leafs Saturday night at the NDCC Arena.The win was the fifth in six attempts for the Hawks, who have outscored the Leafs 24-13 this season.Friday, the one-two combo of Dane Rupert and Landon Andrusiak, who played last season in Nelson, combined for seven points to help the Kelowna Chiefs skate to an 8-6 win.Saturday it was a goaltender’s duel between Marcus Beesley in the Nelson nets and Zack Perehudoff. Beaver Valley took a 1-0 into the first period intermission when Ryan Edwards beat Beesley from the edge of the goal crease.Nelson defenceman Braeden Hikichi tied the game in the second with an assist from Colton Schell.The Leafs, holding a 9-5 shots advantage in the third period and 21-17 in the game, pushed for the victory but could not beat Perehudoff.The loss all but ended Nelson’s bid to overtake Beaver Valley in the Murdoch Division standings. The Hawks now hold an eight-point lead over the Leafs. Beaver Valley also has played one fewer game.However, Nelson still holds a glimmer of hope if the Leafs can sweep a season-ending series next weekend.Saturday, the Hawks once again invade the NDCC Arena before the teams hook up Sunday, January 31 in Fruitvale.LEAFS BANTER: Ryon Sookro leads the Hawks in goals (23) and points (46). The 19-year-old native of South Slocan decided to play for the Hawks after failing to catch on last season with the Leafs. . . .Nelson, third in the Murdoch Division with a 22-17-0-3 record, has eight games remaining on the schedule. . . .Nelson plays host to Castlegar Rebels Tuesday at the NDCC Arena. . . .The game was slugged International Night as the hockey team welcomed visiting students attending school in the Heritage [email protected]last_img read more

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UNICEF finds 47.5% of children under 16 living in poverty in Guyana

first_imgWith 36 per cent of the country living in poverty, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) has foundthat 47.5 per cent of children 16 years old and younger are living in poverty in Guyana.According to the UNICEF Situation Analysis of Children and Women in Guyana 2016, “poverty in Guyana has a child’s face,” revealing that the poverty number from 2006 shows that younger age cohorts have a significantly higher poverty headcount than older ones.It stated that 33.7 per cent of young people aged 16 to 25 years lived in poverty in 2006, while almost half of all children aged 16 and below were poor (47.5 per cent) in 2006. It indicated that data on child poverty was not disaggregated for different ethnicities, regions and/or areas of the country.In addition, the analysis pointed to the fact that the 2014 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) did not calculate poverty rates for the country but used a quintile wealth index to differentiate wealth across households, from poorest to richest and the survey confirmed two main disparities in Guyana: the difference between rural and urban, and the difference between coastal and interior regions.The report stated that while 13 per cent of the population living in the urban areas could be considered poor, the number is raised to 22.5 per cent in rural areas. “As a matter of fact, almost 44 per cent of the population in rural areas would be living in the two smaller wealth quintiles, in comparison to 30 per cent in the urban areas”.According to the last official poverty measurement survey in 2006, 36.1 per cent of the population in the country was living in poverty, including 18.6 percent that were living in extreme poverty.The 2006 measurements confirmed that poverty and extreme poverty were stronger in the interior areas of the country, and were uneven if regions were taken into consideration.Poverty is massiveThe report emphasised that out of all poor people in the country, most of them were living in areas categorised as rural coastal, followed by urban areas and rural interior. It noted that due to the population distribution in the country, most of the poor people would be living in Region Four (Demerara-Mahaica); nonetheless, in percentage terms, poverty is massive in Regions Eight (Potaro-Siparuni), One (Barima-Waini) and Nine (Upper Takatu-Upper Essequibo), where more than 70 per cent of the population living in those areas were considered poor.It stated that one of the challenges in calculating poverty in Guyana is to find a measurement that can encompass different cultures and lifestyles which are present in the country.According to the 2015 World Development Report, children living in poverty experience greater levels of environmental and psychosocial stressors than their higher-income counterparts and that stress and adversity in the first years of life can permanently constrict the development of physical and mental capacities throughout adulthood.“Furthermore, children from disadvantaged families are less likely to receive consistent support and guidance from responsive caregivers. They are also likely to have had less opportunity to develop the critical skills – including skills in controlling their impulses, understanding the perspectives of other people, and focusing attention – that are important for engaging effectively with teachers and other children, paying attention in class, completing assignments, and behaving appropriately,” the UNICEF report added.Guyana has signed onto the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) advance on the Millennium Development Goals call to end poverty. “This time the SDGs on its Target 1.2 openly indicate that poverty must be reduced among women and children,” the report said.UNICEF recommends following SDG Targets 1.1 and 1.242, to develop and implement a methodology to yearly measure poverty and vulnerabilities, capturing the different cultural peculiarities in the country. “The method should allow for monitoring poverty at national level, and at the same time disaggregate poverty for different ages, regions, geographical areas and ethnicities. The method for monitoring poverty should clearly define child poverty, and should adopt a multidimensional measure that complements the monetary method,” the report stressed.It added that the country should take into consideration strengthening support to families in situations of vulnerability, in particular single-parent families through systematic, long-term policies and programmes to ensure access to social services and sustainable income opportunities.Although Guyana is considered an upper middle-income country, it is the third poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, after Haiti and Nicaragua. Unemployment is high and it is particularly concerning for the young population, which represents more than 60 per cent of Guyana’s population. Since 2002, youth unemployment has been consistently higher than 30 per cent and is currently estimated to be about 40 per cent.last_img read more

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Zola ‘in the frame’ for QPR job

first_imgNeil Warnock’s sacking as QPR manager is inevitably covered in all of today’s newspapers.Former Fulham and Manchester City boss Mark Hughes is expected to take over at Loftus Road this week, but The Sun say Gianfranco Zola is also a contender. Elsewhere, Arsenal are looking to sign Chelsea’s Salomon Kalou for £3m, the Daily Mail reports.The paper suggest Arsenal have made an approach after the Blues’ contract talks with Kalou stalled.And the Mail also say Fulham have failed with an attempt to sign Ghana midfielder Derek Boateng from Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk.This page is updated throughout the day. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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The Science of Thanksgiving

first_imgShould science tread into areas of virtue?  Here’s how a science news entry begins: “Rather than rolling your eyes when it’s your turn to bow your head and give thanks, try being grateful. The result just might be good for you. From boosting your mood to improving your relationships, research shows that being thankful is good for your health.”Right off the bat, an unusual article on Live Science assumes most people will roll their eyes at a thanksgiving prayer (meaning, this is stupid).  That reveals a strong reporter bias.  But then, the editors at Live Science assume science can turn a virtue into a self-serving goal: improving one’s own health.  If you pretend to be thankful just to improve your own health, are you really being thankful?Live Science is only echoing what Steve Toepfer of Kent State University thinks about the pragmatic benefits of gratitude.  The self-serving end of his prescription is clear in the if-then statement: “If you are looking to increase your well-being through intentional activities, take 15 minutes three times over three weeks and write letters of gratitude to someone,” he said.  But even if this activity results in measurable improvements in health and happiness by a scientist, it still begs the question of whether it is really thankfulness.  And what if the opening paragraph really advised praying thankfully instead of rolling one’s eyes at the blessing before the feast?Suggested prayer for the secular self-serving follower of Toepfer: “Dear whatever is out there, I know you don’t exist, and this activity is dumb, but a scientist says it is good for my health, so I’m going to pretend to be thankful just to improve my well-being.  So thank me, thank me, thank me, I really appreciate me.”Suggested letter for the same: “Dear grandma, I really care about me, so I’m doing this exercise for my benefit.  Dr. Toepfer, a scientist at Kent State, said my gratitude letter can’t be trivial, so I’m trying real hard to be honest here, but honestly, I can’t think of anything I’m thankful for except myself.  Sorry to take up your time, but I’ll let you know if this 15-minute-a-week plan makes me feel better.”Being thankful means getting your mind off yourself.  Don’t let a scientist trick you with vain words.  True thankfulness can only come from a heart that acknowledges its Creator.  The reason God is angry is that his creatures do not acknowledge Him as God, and are not thankful (Romans 1:21).  So to even start being thankful, you have to acknowledge your Maker as God.  If you haven’t yet done that, Thanksgiving Day is a great time to enter the narrow gate.  Drop your selfish baggage, admit your sin, acknowledge your Creator, and accept the sacrifice of his Son on the cross for your guilt.  Once you appreciate the depth of love your God has displayed for you (Romans 5:1-11), it’s guaranteed to make you thankful (2 Cor 9:15).  Any joy you will feel in your own heart, and any improvements to your health and well-being, will be mere by-products of a far greater goal: blessing God and others by your real, true, thankfulness.(Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Diepsloot school gets a spring clean

first_imgPlay Your Part’s clean-up campaign at Akani Primary, Diepsloot, got learners to not only tidy up their school but also learn the importance of a clean environment. (Images: Shamin Chibba)Play Your Part was at Akani Primary School in Diepsloot for a clean-up campaign that taught pupils about the importance of keeping their environment free of litter.Despite the morning heat, Miss Earth South Africa Carla Viktor and her runner-up, Jade Axon, as well as representatives from Play Your Part and GEM Project joined the schoolchildren on Saturday, 24 October, as they cleared the school of litter.According to Play Your Part representatives, the campaign was in line with Brand South Africa’s mandate to build pride, patriotism and a spirit of active citizenship. Its Play Your Part programme aims to encourage South Africans to use some of their time, money, skills or goods to contribute to a better future for all.Viktor, who was crowned Miss Earth South Africa in September, said the clean-up formed part of the environmental work she would undertake during her year as titleholder. However, her biggest initiatives would be greening projects. “It involves a lot of tree planting, a lot of educational work at schools, teaching the kids why it is important to clean up and recycle, and also getting them to be active citizens.”At the same time as she undertakes her environmental work, she is also preparing for her next big project, that of winning the international Miss Earth pageant in Austria in December.Miss Earth South Africa Carla Viktor didn’t mind getting her hands dirty at the clean-up. Miss Earth South Africa and Play Your Part have partnered for similar initiatives before. KEEPING THE ENVIRONMENT CLEAN IS A HABITAkani Primary principal Fikilie Dikgale said the aim of the clean-up was to remind children about keeping their school clean. “Repetition is very critical because the kids forget. Every quarter there needs to be a campaign like this so that they can be reminded that littering is not acceptable.“The Brand South Africa initiative of Play Your Part is also very appropriate because Akani wants to do our part and you can see we are doing our part to keep the school clean.”Akani’s general manager, Thoko Mbense, said that the habit of cleaning could filter into the Diepsloot community. “The kids needed to learn to pick up litter because not only is it done for the school but for the community too.”She said that keeping their school clean should become embedded in their conscience. “You need to teach them almost everything and remind them. We want this to be a quarterly thing so that it can be part of their conscience.”Akani, which is a Shangaan word meaning “to build”, was chosen as the location for the clean-up after Miss Earth South Africa representatives approached it about the initiative.Akani Primary learners had to throw the litter they had picked up into a Pikitup recycle truck.GEM SPREADING THROUGH SOUTH AFRICAPlay Your Part invited GEM Project to help mobilise volunteers within and outside Diepsloot. GEM, which is an acronym for Going the Extra Mile, has mostly been active in Gauteng. But its founder, Camilo Ramada, said activations would spread beyond the province to Cape Town in January 2016. “In theory, we can be anywhere, but in practice we’re mostly in Johannesburg. But we are already preparing and planning activations in Cape Town from January onwards.”The GEM app, which was developed in conjunction with Play Your Part, rewards volunteers for their good deeds. Volunteers can choose to participate in any campaign listed in the app. Once the good deed is done, they are eligible to receive a reward via the app, termed “a GEM”, which can be converted into a number of products such as airtime, data, pre-paid electricity, or even movie tickets.last_img read more

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County fairs provide more than ribbons, tractors pulls and food

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Many people love county fairs. Whether attendees enjoy riding rides, eating fair food, competing in or watching livestock shows or other performances, there is something for almost everyone to enjoy at county fairs.It is no secret that I enjoy showing our miniature horses at the Morrow County Fair. Although I always try my best and often have good results, my favorite part of the fair is the sense of community. A walk through the barns or a stop at the yearly square dance are always sources of finding good friends with which to enjoy a chat and a laugh. Fun and friendships accompany hard work for me at our county fair. My dad (Ed – left) and my uncle (Bill – right) helped me show my minis in the halter classes at the fair.In addition to my family, I can always count on my friends and fellow exhibitors for a helping hand. My family has learned the hard way that if they come anywhere near the miniature horse barn on show days, they are going to be drafted for a job and they seem to look forward to it and enjoy it.As the miniature herd has expanded, not only have my husband, parents and aunt and uncle become key helpers in readying my horses for the shows, but others have been drafted as well.Lisa making sure Sam looks great when he and I enter the ring.A long-time friend of mine, Lisa, mentioned early in the week that her daughter was a member of the junior fair board. Because of this position, her daughter had to be dropped off and picked up from the fair early so Lisa said she was going to be on the fairgrounds for long periods of time while her daughter worked at the fair.I sent Lisa a text inviting her to come to my show the following day. What she didn’t know is that along with my dad and uncle she was going to become an important part of showing the geldings in the halter classes that day.It was a fun day with family and friends that won’t soon be forgotten.On hitch day of the fair (when the horses show pulling carts and wagons), I usually need some extra help to get all my minis in their classes in a timely manner. I can always count on my fellow exhibitors to lend a hand. On both practice days and show day, the Timmons and Cox families, in addition to my family, made sure I had safe experiences while driving my horses.Everyone pitched it to help when the judge noticed my wagon had a loose wheel.This year, even the judge played a role in making sure my show experience was safe. He noticed a loose wheel on my wagon as I prepared to enter the ring.As my husband held the horses and I sat on the wagon, the judge inspected each wheel for safety while our friend, Josh, tightened the wagon wheel.From practice days to show days to days just roaming around the fairgrounds, I can always count on my family and friends to lend a helping hand or be there for fun and laughs at the county fair.County fairs are much more than ribbons, tractor pulls and food, they are a place where memories and friendships are built that can last a lifetime.last_img read more

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Archers, Tams go at it anew

first_imgMOST READ Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netStung by tough defeats at the end of the first round, defending champion La Salle and Far Eastern U seek to get their campaigns back on track when they mix it up on Wednesday in UAAP Season 80 basketball tournament at Smart Araneta Coliseum.Beaten by fierce rival Ateneo, 75-76, on Sunday, the Green Archers hope to turn their fortunes around against the Tamaraws in the 4 p.m. clash that could serve as a preview of the Final Four.ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City LATEST STORIES BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  View comments Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF presidentcenter_img University of the Philippines faces winless University of Santo Tomas at 2 p.m. Will group seeking reforms get worthwhile results? Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary The Archers have looked vulnerable for most of the first round despite dominant performances from Ben Mbala, who has averaged 30 points in his first five games of the season.La Salle forward Ricci Rivero feels its about time the rest of the Archers step up to ease the burden on Mbala.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“We don’t have to rely on Ben every time, that’s why we have to play as a team because with our lineup, we have players who are capable of doing everything,” said Rivero.Aljun Melecio is expected to return to the lineup after missing the last three games due to dengue fever. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PHlast_img read more

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