50 days to World Transplant Games

first_img6 June 2013There are 50 days to go for the 50 countries that will contest the 2013 World Transplant Summer Games in Durban from 28 July to 4 August.The Games are the biggest organ donor awareness event in the world and aim to offer hope to those awaiting transplants and encourage the public to become donors, by showing the difference that organ transplants can make to the lives of young and old.They’re a celebration of the human spirit, giving individuals with previously life- threatening illnesses, the chance to compete in a high-level sports event and prove that they can not only lead normal, fulfilling lives, but push the boundaries of their physical endurance.Competitors in the Games have to be transplant recipients of either solid organs or bone marrow.Organ donationWorld Transplant Games Federation President, Olivier Coustere, commented; “Countries that have hosted the event have experienced a 30 percent or higher increase in organ donation rates.”South Africans wishing to register as organ donors can visit www.odf.org.zaThe World Transplant Games will unfold at various venues across Durban, with the majority of events planned for the Kings Park sporting precinct, including at the Kings Park Athletics Stadium where a new track has been flown in from Germany to upgrade the facility.EventsOver 50 events in athletics, swimming, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball and bowling will be contested, while cycling and road races will take place in the city.The largest contingent of athletes will come from Great Britain and Northern Ireland (298), followed by 142 from the United States of America, 136 athletes from South Africa and 110 from The Netherlands.The smallest teams will come from Nepal, Japan, Slovakia and Kenya, with only one athlete from each of those countries.2011 GamesAt the 2011 competition in Gothenburg, Sweden, 47 South Africans participated, winning 17 gold, 17 silver and 14 bronze medals.Among the South African competitors who will be defending titles in Durban are: Daniel Matsoso (5km road race, 800m and 1 500m), Lourens Schultz (javelin world record holder), Constance Sithebe (ball throw), Edward Ormond (squash), Anil Balmakund (squash), Cathy de Beer (squash), Tracey Jegels (3km power walk), Kosie Laubscher (golf), Heilie Uys (golf), Robyn Emslie (lawn bowls) and Stephan van den Berg (discus).Four South Africans currently hold World Transplant Games world records.The event is expected to generate R50-million for Durban.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Read More →

Ohio agriculture accused of “poisoning our lake”

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest There was quite a stir this week in Toledo with news regarding the Lucas County commissioners’ sponsorship of a website identifying “hotspots” in the Western Lake Erie Basin watershed for nutrient loading. The Western Lake Erie Basin Nutrient Sources Inventory is described as a “mapping tool that identifies causes of impairment and potential pollutant sources that need to be controlled to achieve desired nutrient load reductions.”The tool reshuffled existing data and offered a new platform for old arguments about the role of agriculture in the Lake Erie’s water quality woes. From a related story on Toledo’s 13abc.com this week:This summer was the third largest algal bloom outbreak in the history of Lake Erie.It was so bad, algae backed up into the Maumee River in downtown Toledo.The city and Lucas County are spending hundreds of millions of dollars fixing sewer and storm water runoff that dumps into the lake.But now there’s hard evidence farms need to do more.Monday, maps of the lower Maumee watershed pinpointed where nutrient runoff is concentrated–it’s primarily in farms south and west of Toledo.Those areas indicate higher amounts of polluting phosphorous coming from those farmland areas.Lucas County commissioner Pete Gerken implores farmers, “Don’t defend the status quo that is poisoning our lake.”So the call is for farmers to dramatically cutback on fertilizer.And the data-based maps could prove farmers they need to do more.Commissioner Tina Skeldon-Wozniak says, “We have to begin to make progress and we believe this tool shows the areas where that can get done.”Unfortunately, most of those within Toledo’s city limits are not familiar with the complexities or the realities of agricultural nutrient management. Improved nutrient management has been taking place for decades as part of a necessary, proactive and ongoing effort to improve agricultural production efficiency, economics and water quality.“The data in the report isn’t new or news,” said Brandon Kern, Senior Director for Strategic Partnerships & Policy Outreach for the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation. “Farmers know they have a role in cleaning up the Lake. Their practical efforts, not political positioning, will get the job done.”At yesterday’s 2017 Ohio Grain Farmers Symposium, researchers outlined the extreme complexity involved with agricultural nutrient management while also pointing out some of the practical efforts being implemented on farms, including tillage reduction to reduce soil erosion.“The biggest thing that comes up over and over is controlling erosion risk. If you can keep your soil in the field, you reduce that particulate-bound phosphorus in the runoff and that is the biggest risk driver for most fields,” said Elizabeth Dayton, a soil scientist with Ohio State University at the Ohio Grain Farmers Symposium in Columbus. “And most everyone agrees that if you are banding or injecting you are getting good soil contact with your fertilizer and not increasing your erosion. The challenge is always the time, the talent and the funding to make that happen.”USDA Agricultural Research Service agricultural engineer Kevin King agrees on the importance of getting nutrients under the soil surface as a part of the 4Rs. He also spoke at yesterday’s 2017 Ohio Grain Farmers Symposium.“There are no silver bullets with this, but first and foremost is the 4Rs. We first have to identify the source of fertilizer we have and we need to be soil testing and adhering to those soil tests. We need to use the Tri-State recommendations and we need to be putting that fertilizer on as close to when the plant needs it as possible — no winter or fall applications. Then if you can get it below the surface, that is the ideal situation. We have got to get it in contact with the soil and get those nutrients down in that top inch or two,” King said. “We need to be talking about water management as well. We know that the largest amount of nutrients are transferred in those rainfall events that are an inch or two or greater. How do we store more of that water in our landscape? We’ve got means to do that. Drainage water management — this idea of artificially raising the outlet elevations of tile drainage — can go a long way in doing that. We can also raise the organic content of our soils through reduced tillage or no-till. For every percent of organic matter we can store an additional three-quarters of an inch of water. There is a new concept of using more retention/detention basins on the property to store water and maybe use that for irrigation at a later date. Being able to address some of the hydrology can keep water from going downstream.”Accounting for the available phosphorus for the crop is also increasingly important, King said.“Issues like legacy phosphorus are still unknown right now. Since the 1970s a lot of phosphorus went into the watersheds and we have enormous amounts in reserve out there in some fields. We need to be more aware of that,” King said. “We need to do soil tests and be aware of what is out there but we also need to make sure we move our mentality from a ‘build and maintain’ type approach to a ‘feed the crop’ mentality. Only put on what the crop needs or maybe a little less than the crop needs and understand that you have that legacy reserve out there. We need a better understanding of how much of that legacy phosphorus is transferred in any given year and is available to the plant.”And, while the farm community is actively taking these and other steps to address water quality issues, there are no quick solutions to Lake Erie’s broad-based algal bloom problems, no matter what county commissioners, news reporters or a new tool using old data have to say about it.last_img read more

Read More →

Premier Announced to Media of Investigation of British Atlantic Financial Services

first_img Bishop says peace & prosperity is everybody’s responsibility at Law Enforcers Church Service Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 12 Nov 2014 – While we await what will be the fate of floundering British Atlantic Financial Services Ltd, the government is deciding if it will bail the company out to save the thousands of policies…and there will also be an investigation into the handling of the company’s case. The Turks and Caicos Weekly News runs a story on the probe, announced to media by the Premier. Hon Dr Rufus Ewing is quoted saying: “We will be investigating internally this particular issue with regard to this particular case and the FSC in general,” It took the FSC six months to come to the determination that BAFSL should be wound up or liquidated and it is said, FSC Managing Director, Kevin Higgins charged that the regulatory framework of the FSC needs bolstering… he hit out at government and government retaliated with “efforts have been made to introduce relevant laws.” Managing Director of BAFSL, Wilbur Caley went on a media campaign to explain that his company had a plan to expand and grow the business, but was prevented; that public relations move and the decision of policy holders not to liquidate as yet anyway, has caused the Supreme Court to delay its decision. The Premier publically asked for deep consideration by all of those involved. It is said British Atlantic is some $6.2 million dollars in the hole. Veras confirmed as second murder, investigation launched Related Items:British Atlantic Financial Services, investigaTION, premier rufus ewing, turks and caicos weekly news Beaches puts former Premier on blast about controversial pier Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for youlast_img read more

Read More →