Fridays on the Fly: Wes Hodges’ Proper Etiquette For Fishing With Guides

first_imgIntro by Justin Forrest, words by Wes HodgesFishing with a guide in new waters is one of the best ways to learn about an area, catch some fish, and make new friends.Guiding is one of the noblest professions in the world if you ask me. It takes years of dedication to the craft, the water, and the fish. That’s why people turn to a guide when they’re looking to catch fish in a new place. They teach you what to use, where to use it, how to use it, and when to use it. You’re getting years of experience crammed into your brain during a half day of fishing. It’s worth every penny.That being said, there are a couple things folks need to realize when they are looking to hire a guide. Sure, you’re paying them for a service, but that doesn’t make them your employee. Whenever I fish with a guide, I shut up, listen, and do what they say. Nine times out of ten, I’m catching fish and having a damn good time doing it. I’ve fished with guides in the Florida Keys for Permit, in Boca Grande for Tarpon, and in WNC for trout. Whether you’re fishing in a mountain stream, a wide inlet, or a coastal flat, it’s all the same.To get a professional opinion on the subject, I reached out to Wes Hodges, owner of Wesley Hodges Fly Fishing in Blacksburg, Va. He’s been fly fishing most of his life and knows a thing or two about guiding. Wes was kind enough to share his must-dos, must-don’ts, and his biggest pet peeves as a professional fishing guide.Wesley Hodges Fly FishingPhoto: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingRule Number One:  Never Be LateMy trips are almost always catered to a specific day and time of year, but also to the client’s needs. For instance, in the middle of summer, when the fish activity is at its peak early and late, I could start a trip at 6 a.m., 7 a.m., or even 1 p.m.  It all depends on the water, the hatches, and the fish. Nothing is constant in nature and my trip start times are dictated by that. If a client shows up late, we could miss the very time in which the fishing activity is at its peak.“I can’t control the fishing but I can damn sure control lunch!”Also, a guide should never be late for his trip.  That is never, ever good.  When that does happen, don’t make excuses.  Be a man and own up to your mistake. That is my number one pet peeve.  And yes, I have been late for a trip.Wesley Hodges Fly FishingPhoto: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingRule Number Two: Never Expect To Catch FishExpect to have a badass time and a good lunch. I have had clients that assumed their booking of a fishing trip would automatically result in world-class fishing as if I was Poseidon. Common statements and questions include:“How many fish should we catch today?”“I just want to catch a smallmouth over 22 inches!”“I caught over a hundred fish in Tenn. Should I expect that in Va.?”That is simply not the case. There are so many factors that go into a successful day of fishing. You have to account for the wind (especially in fly-fishing due to the casting), water flows on tailwater rivers, and sometimes the fish just don’t freaking eat.“Nothing good ever comes from an overly aggressive fly-cast.”I understand that clients get all amped up to fish because I know how I am when I get a day on the water.  I can’t blame them, but the clients need to remember that we are guides, not gods.  When I am faced with a client that expects those outcomes I simply reply with, “I can’t control the fishing but I can damn sure control lunch!”Wesley Hodges Fly FishingPhoto: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingRule Number Three:  Slow DownThis is very important for the client to understand. It does not directly impact me, but I want my clients to have the most enjoyable experience on the water. That experience needs to start with slowing down their life for that day, slowing down their mental state, and slowing down their cast. Nothing good ever comes from an overly aggressive fly-cast.One of my best trips was with the head honcho of a construction company. He desperately wanted to catch something larger than a Brook Trout, so I took him to a stream that holds large, wild Brown Trout. This man has worked so hard, for so long, that he worked every ounce of relaxation out of his soul. He put his waders on and set up his rod quickly. Hell, he even drank his scalding hot coffee in one large gulp.“Do I need to tie you up to that sycamore tree again?”In an effort to make this “bird dog” gentleman controllable, I calmly walked him down the stream and asked him to rest against a large tree sitting along the shoreline. I gave him clear directions, “Watch that run against the far bank, right below the fast water. When I get back from the truck, let me know how many trout you saw rise.”Photo: Wesley Hodges Fly FishingI came back in 20 minutes and the man was asleep, knocked out cold, resting against the large sycamore tree. I let him sleep for about another 20 minutes as I finished my coffee and tied our flies on. I asked him how many trout he saw rise and he replied, “Only one.”We caught that fish and many more wild browns on that trip. We didn’t share one word about his profession for the remainder of the day. We only talked about the important stuff in life; family, bird dogs, fine shotguns, streamers, and morel mushrooms. I still guide this man multiple times each year.  Whenever he is getting uncontrollable I will calmly say, “Do I need to tie you up to that sycamore tree again?”Wes Hodges is the owner of Wesley Hodges Fly Fishing in Blacksburg, Va. He guides fly fishing trips down the New River, on private water, and to remote destinations like Montana and Maine. Follow him on Instagram to keep up with his travels.Justin Forrest is an outdoor writer, fly fishing addict, and co-founder of Narrative North—based in Asheville, N.C. He posts pictures of cats and fishing on Instagram sometimes.last_img read more

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Argentine Military Hospital Saves Lives

first_img The Argentine Air Force relies on a rapid-deployment military hospital in Haiti to provide health care to all the members of MINUSTAH, the U.N. mission in the country. In the days following the earthquake, the hospital increased its capacity to accommodate 15,000 patients and was reinforced with eight professionals. “We provided care for members of MINUSTAH and the Haitian population because most of the public hospitals as well as the hospitals run by the Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders, the Cuban hospital and others had collapsed, so the people who lived near the hospital were treated here,” the unit’s Commander, Col. Osvaldo De Simone, who is also a doctor, explained to Diálogo. “We had to care for the population as much as possible … because everything had been knocked over as a result of the earthquake, like the X-ray machine and the operating room. Since we didn’t know whether there were going to be other earthquakes, we decided to care for everyone outside, in the parking lot,” De Simone explained. In a single night, doctors at the Argentine hospital treated 482 patients, the majority of them seriously injured, and performed several surgeries. “In less than two hours, we repaired the generators, the fuel tanks and the water [purification] plant, and we managed to get the operating room set up. The most serious cases were evacuated to Santo Domingo [in the Dominican Republic] on 20 flights, where we took 38 patients; all of them made it alive and [eventually] recovered,” De Simone said. By Dialogo April 01, 2010last_img read more

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Colombia Hopes Peace Negotiations Will End FARC Uprising

first_imgBy Dialogo January 07, 2013 BOGOTÁ – The year 2012 finished on a bright note with both the Colombian government and Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) rebels engaging in peace talks in Havana to end Latin America’s last remaining guerrilla war. In August — the halfway point of his four-year term — Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos announced that the two sides would launch negotiations following an inaugural ceremony in Oslo, Norway. “The FARC is not finished,” according to an analysis by the Bogotá think tank Insight Crime, noting that the terrorist group “still operates in coca-growing areas, from which it can draw tremendous revenue, increasingly dabbling in the trade of the processed cocaine itself.” The two sides began meeting in Havana for several months of preliminary talks that involved the president’s brother, former newspaper editor Enrique Santos. “We decided on Cuba for security, and above all because it guaranteed confidentiality,” Enrique Santos wrote the Bogotá daily El Espectador. Difficult start to Cuba peace talks Santos said one of the most difficult issues that came up during the preliminary talks was convincing rebel leader Jaime Alberto Parra Rodríguez to make the trip to Cuba. Santos said the rebels were distrustful of plans to shuttle Parra out of the jungle on a government helicopter. “It was very hard to convince the FARC to … accept putting [Parra] on a helicopter supplied by the state,” Santos wrote. “At the time of picking him up, he appeared guarded by more than 50 men armed to the teeth. In the end there was crying by women guerrillas and a farewell ceremony. That was the first big achievement: getting Jaramillo to Havana.” At an October news conference following the inauguration ceremony in Oslo, lead FARC negotiator Iván Márquez made no apologies for the FARC’s war crimes. Humberto de la Calle, lead government negotiator, responded that if the FARC thinks it has all the answers, its fighters should disarm and test their ideas by running for political office. He pointed out that many former rebels have followed this path, including the presidents of Brazil and Uruguay, and Bogotá Mayor Gustavo Petro. Analysts say the end game of these negotiations is to convince the FARC to demobilize and form a legal political party, a move the rebels had previously refused to discuss. Ceasefire announced On Nov. 19, Márquez announced a two-month unilateral ceasefire. However, Colombian officials say that since then, the FARC has continued to target government troops and that four soldiers have been killed and 22 injured in rebel attacks. President Santos refused to call off government troops because he said a respite would give the FARC time to recover and prepare a new offensive. In a year-end speech, the president defended his record and said that the number of rebels killed, injured or captured this year increased by 18 percent. Defense Minister Juan Carlos Pinzón pointed out that the FARC now has less than 8,000 fighters while a smaller rebel group, the National Liberation Army, or ELN, which may also join the peace talks, has fewer than 1,500 fighters. Santos has also hinted that he’d call off the talks if they show no progress by the end of 2013. José Roberto Leon Riaño, director of the Colombian National Police, recently told reporters: “We have seen [FARC set off explosives and] acquire military equipment as insurance to prepare for a terrorist wave once the truce ends.”last_img read more

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Confrontation in Colombia Leaves Six Dead

first_imgBy Dialogo May 16, 2013 Five guerrillas from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and a police officer were killed during armed confrontations and attacks in different regions of Colombia, just before the peace talks between this insurgency and the national government resumed in Havana, authorities reported on May 14. In the rural area of the Puerto Jordán village, in Arauca department, five insurgents were killed, and three others were captured, two of whom were minors, the Colombian Army said in a statement. Meanwhile, a police officer was killed and four others injured in an attack by guerrillas from the 32nd Front of the FARC near a checkpoint in the rural area of Mocoa municipality, capital of Putumayo department, the Police reported. Delegates of Juan Manuel Santos’s government traveled to Cuba on May 14, in order to resume peace talks with the FARC, which began in 2012 with the aim of ending the internal armed conflict in Colombia, but without agreeing to a bilateral cease fire. The Colombian armed conflict, which also involved other leftist guerrillas, right-wing paramilitary groups and drug trafficking organizations, has left over 3.7 million displaced and 600,000 dead over nearly 50 years.last_img read more

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How to optimize the return of your credit union’s investment portfolio: Part 2, creating an investment plan

first_imgIdentifying who has authority to make investment decisions, with the understanding (per the regulations) that “Those with authority must be qualified by education or experience to assess the risk characteristics of investments and investment transactions.”Identifying the broker-dealers and safekeepers the CU may useHow the CU will address a security that, after its purchase, falls outside of policy or otherwise fails a requirement of the regulationsHow the CU will conduct trading activities, including the following:Who has buy/sell authorityAccount size trading limitsCash flow allocationStop loss or saleLimits on type, quantity and maturityTime limits on holding securities; andInternal controls, like segregation of duties. 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,David Barnes Mr. Barnes, a licensed attorney and registered investment advisor representative (Series 65), leads the Heber Fuger Wendin team in service to their institutional and individual clients. He became a Heber … Web: www.heberinvestments.com Details In my first CUInsight article in a series on managing credit union investment portfolios (March, 2015), I summarized the benefits and basic steps in skillfully managing your credit union’s investment portfolio, which are as follows:Create a plan (e.g., draft a good investment policy);Execute the plan (e.g., buy the right securities at the right price and sell the wrong securities at the right price);Monitor the portfolio on an ongoing basis (e.g., keep an eye on the credit, liquidity and interest rate risk of the securities in the portfolio);In this second article of the series, I’ll review the first step; creating an investment plan, the most important part of which is drafting an investment policy.The law requires federal credit unions to have investment policies. 12 CFR 703.3, which is part of the “Investment and Deposit Activities” section of the regulations governing federal credit unions, reads in relevant part, “A Federal credit union’s board of directors must establish written investment policies consistent with the Act, this part, and other applicable laws and regulations and must review the policy at least annually.” Drafting an investment policy is a balancing act. It must include at least basic obligations and limitations (as listed in 12 CFR 703.3) but not too many more than that. Why? Because, as stated in my previous article, examiners often look to determine whether your credit union really follows its own investment policy – all of it. If you don’t follow every provision of the policy, whether in the purchase of securities, monitoring of them or any other provision, expect to the examiners to ask for an explanation, regardless of whether your credit union is legally obligated to do it. So, if you include a provision in the policy obligating your CU to do something (or to refrain from doing something), you’re expected to comply with it. In effect, when writing an investment policy, you’re creating your own law and the cops (examiners) will police it even if the regulations don’t require you to include a given provision in the policy. And this phenomenon applies to all policies – not just investment policies. So, your goal here should be to write a Goldilocks investment policy – not too hard, not too soft, but just right.Certainly an important part of any investment policy is the objective of the investment portfolio, which in theory is simple: get the portfolio to return an amount that is greater than the cost of acquiring the funds in the portfolio. Easy enough on paper. But optimizing (as distinguished from maximizing) the return of your CU’s investment portfolio must done within the parameters of your CU’s asset-liability management (“ALM”) obligations, not just a reach for high returns, particularly while we wait for interest rates to inevitably rise, which will in turn adversely affect the price of bonds. Since the investment portfolio is made up of the extra liquidity of the CU (e.g., the money that isn’t loaned out), a CU must be mindful of its liquidity needs by keeping an appropriate portion of the funds in the investment portfolio quickly accessible and easily convertible to cash. This should an important part of a CU’s ALM tactics (short-terms plans) and strategy (long-term plans) and should be expressed in the investment policy.The basic terms of your CU’s investment policy must cover the following items per 12 CFR 703.3:The purpose/objectives of the CU’s investmentsCharacteristics of the permissible investments (e.g., issuers, maturities, call provisions, average life, etc.)How the CU will manage risk, including:interest rate risk (“IRR”)liquidity risk (as briefly explained above)concentration risk (e.g., a lack of diversity among issuers, geography, maturities, etc.)center_img Those are the elements of a good investment policy; not too hard, not too soft, but just right. But planning is relatively easy. Execution is tougher. So, in my next article, I’ll summarize how to execute the investment plan and optimize its return within the context of a CU’s overall asset-liability management environment. Because, as the great German writer and statesman Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote, “A really great talent finds its happiness in execution.”last_img read more

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Thankful, encouraged, inspired, powerful, giddy, connected, honored and proud

first_img“I sit here, trying to put into words my experience with Next Top Credit Union Exec and the CEO/Executive Team Network conference,” wrote Shannon Cahoon, the winner of last year’s challenge, in a blog post shortly after the culminating event. “Even now, weeks after the final thank-yous and good-byes, I struggle to coherently explain how it makes me feel.”Community outreach coordinator at $1 billion Fibre Federal Credit Union, Longview, Wash., Cahoon goes on in the post to name eight key feelings she experienced: thankful, encouraged, inspired, powerful, giddy, connected, honored and proud.For eight years running, the CUES Next Top Credit Union Exec challenge has been making a positive difference in the professional lives of the young credit union professionals (non-CEOs, age 35 and under) who take it on, boosting their enthusiasm for credit unions and their confidence in their ability to build careers in the CU industry. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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First Chick-fil-A on Long Island Debuts in Port Jefferson Station

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York About 100 Long Islanders camped outside of the new Chick-fil-A in Port Jefferson Station to be among the first on line Wednesday when the eatery opened its first location on Long Island.More than a dozen tents filled the parking lot Tuesday night outside the fast-food chicken chain’s new venue on Nesconset Highway, as Chick-fil-A fanatics shared stories while a DJ blasted music. Although the Atlanta-based company’s CEO has drawn criticism from LGBT advocates for reportedly donating funds to hate groups opposed to same-sex marriage, no protesters crashed the party.“It’s like Christmas morning,” said Anthony Viscuso, a 35-year-old insurance agent who was first on line for the grand opening at 6 a.m. Wednesday. “I’ve never camped out in my life, but for Chick-fil-A? If the hurricane was coming, I’d be here.”Once the big moment came, it sounded like New Year’s Eve with workers banging on pots and pans, ringing cowbells and lots of cheering. The first 100 customers scored a year’s supply of Chil-fil-A—52 certificates for free meals. Campers were also treated to free breakfast, lunch and dinner, plus a few snacks in between, throughout Tuesday, a company spokesman said.Viscuso bought camping gear and arrived at 5 a.m. Tuesday to secure his place in line, which officially began forming 24 hours prior to the grand opening. About 20 others joined him over the next hour. The mood was mellow during the day, he said, but a rush of campers arrived Tuesday evening as anticipation mounted for the debut.Among the first 10 on line was a couple from Coram who recalled having their first date at a Chick-fil-A in Florida, where they met while attending college. They described the restaurant’s opening as a “miracle.”“We never did anything like this, but for Chick-fil-A, we made the exception,” said Catherine Gretschel, a 26-year-old law school graduate who camped out with her boyfriend, Brian Blomberg, 25, a professional golfer.Casey Durham, a Chick-fil-A company representative who’s worked 30 store openings nationwide, said campsites are the norm before a grand opening. Asked if there would be lines as bad as the six-hour wait this reporter endured upon the grand opening of LI’s first Sonic in North Babylon four years ago, Durham said customers will be in and out in 15 minutes.“We’re planning for an extremely busy day,” he said.Viscuso, the first customer—who lives around the block and used to tailor roadtrips to ensure he passed a Chick-fil-A—said he ordered a chicken biscuit meal, two chicken biscuits, a spicy chicken biscuit, biscuits and gravy, a chicken burrito and a chicken breast on the side.He called it “love at first bite.”David Kilmnick, CEO of the nonprofit Long Island LGBT Service Network, said that since the company appears to have ceased donating money to anti-gay marriage groups, he and his advocates have ” bigger chicken to fry.”“We’re going to keep a close eye on it to make sure the company is going to keep their word,” he said. “We certainly are not going to let them off the hook.”The restaurant, which features a double drive-thru, is scheduled to be open 6:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday to Saturday.Campers waited for 24 hours to be the first on line at the first Long Island Chick-fil-A (Photo by Katie Chuber)last_img read more

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Lily May takes on the men and shines

first_img2 Mar 2017 Lily May takes on the men and shines England 14-year-old Lily May Humphreys declared her intentions for the 2017 season with a remarkable third place finish in a men’s professional event in Spain. The honours in the Evolve Tour’s 54-hole tournament went to Miguel Angel Martin, a three-time winner on the European Tour who blitzed away from the field with a score of 13-under. But Humphreys, who shot level par, could have been second were it not for a triple bogey eight at the 14th in her first round. As it was, she had rounds of 71, 73 72 and finished just a shot behind Spain’s David Borda. Humphreys, from Channels in Essex, played in the event just after joining the England Golf girls’ squad for warm weather training at Quinta do Lago in Portugal. She’s following up on a remarkable year in 2016. Humphreys, from Channels in Essex, enjoyed a long list of successes, including wins in the Fairhaven Trophies, the English U16 girls’ championship, the North of England U16 championship and the Liphook Scratch Cup, where she became the youngest-ever player to take the trophy. She was also third in the European Young Masters. Image © Stills Photographylast_img read more

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England boys ready to sit French exam

first_img Six members of the boys’ squad will take part in next month’s French Boys’ Open each with the aim of becoming the first English winner since 1988.Cheshire’s Oscar Doran and Remy Miller (pictured above) are joined in the selection by Hertfordshire duo Max Hopkins and Jack Bigham.Josh Berry (Yorkshire) and Craig Passmore (Devon) complete the six-strong squad who will represent England at Les Aisses Golf Club between April 9-13.Not since James Cook won the event in 1988 has an English name appeared on the Trophee Michel Carlhian.All six boys took part in a recent squad training camp at Quinta Do Lago in Portugal as a follow on from a number of coaching sessions over the winter months at the National Golf Centre at Woodhall Spa.The format for the 2020 French Boys’ Open sees players compete on an individual and team basis.After a 36-hole stroke play event, the top 32 players qualify for the match play.For those boys aged under 16 who miss out on the last 32 of the match play, there is a chance to compete for the Trophee Pierre Massie.The only member of the England squad who would be eligible for this secondary event is 14-year-old Berry (pictured below).In addition to the individual honours, there is also a Nations Cup element to the play over the opening two days.Players of the same nationality will be grouped in threes with the two best scores from the opening 36-holes of stroke play going towards a team aggregate.Hopkins, Berry and Passmore will be in one team with Bigham, Miller and Doran in the other.Previous winners of the individual championship include Ryder Cup stars Sergio Garcia and Nicolas Colsaerts as well as European Tour players Romain Wattel and Guido Migliozzi.Les Aisses Golf Club – located south of Orleans in the Loire Valley – is a Martin Hawtree design and recognised as one of the toughest tracks in France.The par 72, heathland course stretches to 7270 yards from the back tees with each hole flanked by dense woodland.In total, there have been seven previous English winners of the event which was first staged in 1926. Tags: Cheshire, Devon, England Boys’ Squad, Hertfordshire, Yorkshire 3 Mar 2020 England boys ready to sit French exam last_img read more

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