Premier Announced to Media of Investigation of British Atlantic Financial Services

first_img Bishop says peace & prosperity is everybody’s responsibility at Law Enforcers Church Service Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 12 Nov 2014 – While we await what will be the fate of floundering British Atlantic Financial Services Ltd, the government is deciding if it will bail the company out to save the thousands of policies…and there will also be an investigation into the handling of the company’s case. The Turks and Caicos Weekly News runs a story on the probe, announced to media by the Premier. Hon Dr Rufus Ewing is quoted saying: “We will be investigating internally this particular issue with regard to this particular case and the FSC in general,” It took the FSC six months to come to the determination that BAFSL should be wound up or liquidated and it is said, FSC Managing Director, Kevin Higgins charged that the regulatory framework of the FSC needs bolstering… he hit out at government and government retaliated with “efforts have been made to introduce relevant laws.” Managing Director of BAFSL, Wilbur Caley went on a media campaign to explain that his company had a plan to expand and grow the business, but was prevented; that public relations move and the decision of policy holders not to liquidate as yet anyway, has caused the Supreme Court to delay its decision. The Premier publically asked for deep consideration by all of those involved. It is said British Atlantic is some $6.2 million dollars in the hole. Veras confirmed as second murder, investigation launched Related Items:British Atlantic Financial Services, investigaTION, premier rufus ewing, turks and caicos weekly news Beaches puts former Premier on blast about controversial pier Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for youlast_img read more

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Carbon nanotube logic device operates on subnanowatt power

first_img Citation: Carbon nanotube logic device operates on subnanowatt power (2013, September 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-09-carbon-nanotube-logic-device-subnanowatt.html Toward achieving one million times increase in computing efficiency The researchers, Michael L. Geier, et al., at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, have published their paper on the subnanowatt CNT logic in a recent issue of Nano Letters.”A modern-day integrated circuit has more than 1 billion transistors,” coauthor Mark C. Hersam, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry, and Medicine at Northwestern University, told Phys.org. “Consequently, the power dissipation per transistor needs to be very low in order for the entire circuit to have a reasonable power consumption. In fact, it is generally accepted that power consumption is the key limiting factor to achieving further increases in the complexity (i.e., number of transistors) in integrated circuits.”As the researchers explain, one of the biggest advantages of CMOS architecture is that it has intrinsically low power consumption. This benefit arises from the fact that, unlike other logic architectures, one of the two types of transistors (p-type or n-type) is turned off under steady state conditions in each logic gate in CMOS devices. In order to fully take advantage of this potential for extremely low power consumption, the p-type and n-type transistors need to have precisely tuned and well-separated threshold voltages, which are the voltage levels that determine whether the device is ON or OFF. So far, this issue of the threshold voltages has not been addressed, and the researchers here identified it as the key challenge limiting the realization of highly integrated CNT-based CMOS electronics.In their study, the researchers used a metal gate structure to achieve symmetric and clearly separated threshold voltages for p-type and n-type CNT transistors, resulting in the ultralow power consumption. In the static states, in which the device is either ON or OFF, power consumption is less than 0.1 nW. At the midpoint of the transfer state, when both p-type and n-type transistors are simultaneously in the ON state, the voltage reaches its peak at 10 nW. By connecting multiple CNT transistors in various configurations, the researchers demonstrated inverter, NAND and NOR logic gates. In the future, these gates can be integrated into complex circuits, where they can provide subnanowatt static power consumption along with the other advantages of CNTs, such as solution processability and flexibility.”We are now working on making more complicated circuits, where we will have substantially more transistors and cascaded logic gates,” Hersam said. “We also have an interest in combining carbon nanotubes with other emerging nanoelectronic materials in our lab (e.g., molybdenum disulfide [MoS2]).” © 2013 Phys.org. All rights reserved. Illustrations of (a) the CNT CMOS inverter and (b) a cross-section of an individual CNT transistor, including a 25-nm-thick Ni gate that enables ultralow power consumption. (c) Atomic force microscopy image of the CNT film morphology in the transistor channel region. Credit: Geier, et al. ©2013 American Chemical Society This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Journal information: Nano Letters (Phys.org) —Researchers have demonstrated a new carbon nanotube (CNT)-based logic device that consumes just 0.1 nanowatts (nW) in its static ON and OFF states, representing the lowest reported value by 3 orders of magnitude for CNT-based CMOS logic devices. The device could serve as a building block for large-area, ultralow-power CNT logic circuits that can be used to realize a variety of nanoelectronics applications. Explore further More information: Michael L. Geier, et al. “Subnanowatt Carbon Nanotube Complementary Logic Enabled by Threshold Voltage Control.” Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/nl402478plast_img read more

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