Decree bans reporting of natural disasters without prior government permission

first_img May 19, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Decree bans reporting of natural disasters without prior government permission September 22, 2014 Find out more News Dominican RepublicAmericas February 15, 2017 Find out more June 25, 2015 Find out more A decree that bans news coverage of natural disasters without prior government approval in order to prevent panic and bans the media from “showing disrespect to the authorities and public institutions” is ridiculous and dangerous, Reporters Without Borders said today.Adopted on 7 May but not released for 10 days, the decree does not specify what sanctions will apply to violators and simply says that a government commission will assess the seriousness of each case.”The Dominican government’s decree poses a grave danger to press freedom by giving the authorities control over the media,” Reporters Without Borders said. “It is not the government’s job to decide for the press what news should be reported. Furthermore, the offences are ill-defined and the penalties are not specified, and this vagueness will open the way for arbitrary decisions.”The text of the decree has sparked an outcry in the Dominican press since finally being published in the daily newspaper El Día on 17 May, and journalists have been voicing their discontent. Help by sharing this information Journalists wounded while covering street clashes in Santo Domingo Receive email alerts Newscenter_img to go further News Organisation News Follow the news on Dominican Republic Hostile climate for Dominican media since start of 2015 Dominican Republic: News presenter and producer gunned down in mid-broadcast RSF_en Dominican RepublicAmericas last_img read more

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Two police officers shot, one killed responding to report of cars being broken into in Alabama

first_imgiStock(BIRMINGHAM, Ala.) — Two police officers were shot and one has died while responding to a report that cars were being broken into in Birmingham, Alabama.The shooting happened at about 2 a.m. on Sunday, according to police.The officers approached a suspect in the break-ins and began patting him down to see if he was armed, Birmingham Police Chief Patrick Smith said at an early morning press conference. It was then that the suspect pulled out a gun and began firing at the officers.One officer, a sergeant, was struck by gunfire and killed, while the other has been taken to UAB Hospital in critical condition, according to police.Police said one of the suspects was taken into custody, while another was injured and taken to the hospital. His condition was unknown.The police department continues to investigate the shooting, and said another person may have been involved.The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office sent prayers to the officers early Sunday. Birmingham is located in the county.It was just Saturday that 17 people at an apartment complex in Birmingham woke up to their cars broken into, according to ABC affiliate WBMA.It’s not clear if the two incidents are related. Smith said the city had been having a recent issue with vehicle thefts as well. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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‘Superbug’ highlights dangers of antibiotic resistance

first_imgA “superbug” that is resistant to colistin — the antibiotic of last resort — was recently found in a U.S. patient with a urinary tract infection. Sarah Fortune, professor of immunology and infectious diseases at Harvard Chan School, discusses the danger posed by pan-resistant bacteria and how best to fight it.Just how big a problem is this new “superbug”?The media makes it sound catastrophic, but this particular case of antibiotic resistance — which was found in a woman who has now recovered — is probably not quite as new as some recent reports have suggested. The U.S. actually has seen some colistin-resistant organisms over the past ten years. However, this is the first appearance of what is called plasma-mediated colistin resistance — which means that a gene called mcr-1, which enables bacteria to be resistant to colistin, is carried on a piece of DNA called a plasmid that can be rapidly exchanged between organisms, so that other bacteria can become resistant.Although this particular case of antibiotic resistance may not be as acute as the media makes it sound, in general these increasingly high-level resistances are an enormous problem. We should be scared enough that we do something about it while we still have antibiotics that work. I think it is easy to take for granted having an arsenal of really effective antibiotics—we have about 100 or so right now. But bacteria are going to evolve resistances to them, and we must be mindful of that. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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