Haven’t heard of Juneteenth? Here’s what you need to know

first_imgBastiaan Slabbers/iStockBy CHRISTINA CARREGA, ABC News(NEW YORK) — Celebration, reflection and progression are what historians say some African Americans across the country anticipate each year with the commemoration of Juneteenth.American history lessons generally teach that when President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862, it ended the Civil War and slavery.But it took another 30 months and 19 days for the order to be carried out in Galveston, Texas — the last area in the U.S. where African Americans were still enslaved.Texas was one of the seven Confederate States of America, and even when Lincoln’s executive order was enacted on Jan. 1, 1863, “they weren’t going to recognize that anyway,” said Dwayne Jones, chief executive officer of the Galveston Historical Foundation.“In fact, there were slave owners who moved from parts of the South, from slave states, to continue the practice of slavery in Texas because they knew they could practice there for a longer time without interruption,” said Kelly E. Navies, a museum specialist and oral historian with the National Museum of African American History and Culture.Jones said that when Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston on June 19, 1865, with a force of 2,000 Union troops dressed in red to enforce the Emancipation Proclamation, it was “very significant.”Granger read a synopsis of the Emancipation Proclamation and the last enslaved people in the U.S were free.In the beginning, the day was known as Emancipation Day, and the first celebration kicked off in January 1866, when about 1,000 African American families gathered in Galveston for a peaceful presentation at one of the city’s earliest African American chapels, said Jones.During the church-oriented event, a hog was roasted as songs filled the air in between readings of the proclamation.A combination of the month and date of Granger’s arrival in Galveston transformed the holiday into the name it’s been known as for over 100 years: Juneteenth.“The celebration of Juneteenth gives people a chance to pause and think about the history behind what we are going through right now,” said Navies. “It gives people the opportunity to ask themselves what are the root causes to the racial conflicts we are experiencing.”Juneteenth 155 years laterObservances of Juneteenth have generally become more secular, but the tradition remains as celebrations have expanded to cities including Buffalo, Kansas City and Chicago.This year, due to the coronavirus pandemic, many traditional in-person Juneteenth gatherings have been scheduled to take place through livestreaming services like Facebook Live and Zoom.The police-involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25 and the protests that followed have generated an increased interest in the history of Juneteenth.“We thought for the 150th anniversary five years ago, we would have gotten more attention, but it really took, unfortunately, other events in order to bring attention to it,” said Jones.Navies said the conflicts between African Americans and police can be traced back to the Reconstruction Era that occurred between 1865 to 1877.“Police stations and all of that were formed with the determination to control the newly freed African Americans, and that continues till this day,” said Navies. “Juneteenth resonates on so many different levels with Americans in this contemporary era.”“We have to fight for more than just justice; there has to be the ability to prevent situations that allow us to be the sort of victims we have been,” said James Felton Keith, who is running to represent New York’s 13th Congressional District in the House of Representatives.In New York City, Keith has organized the “Juneteenth 1,000,000 March NYC,” where civil rights and grassroots organizations are expected to gather — with masks and gloves on — in front of City Hall, “where the most power exists,” Keith said. The group plans to march through Manhattan and paint a Black Lives Matter street mural outside City Hall, which is also across the street from the police department’s headquarters, said Keith.“Every march post-George Floyd is about justice, but this one is about policy change and that’s why we are marching starting at City Hall,” said Keith. “No power, no justice, no peace.”Navies said it makes sense that activism is associated with Juneteenth, “because here, you have people still struggling to achieve the civil rights they never fully gained.”“This is what it is about: What does freedom mean and how do we achieve that freedom?” she said.Juneteenth after 2020Keith said he grew up celebrating Juneteenth with his family by going to rallies in Gary, Indiana, and other cities, and he is disappointed and ashamed that it took this long for the day to get wide recognition.“Juneteenth is now on people’s radar even though we have been using it to validate our existence which has been wiped away from us for generations,” Keith said. “Juneteenth truly represents freedom.”Jones said he sees the increased interest as an opportunity to keep the momentum going and expand the history of Juneteenth into classrooms.“We teach American, local, state, regional history through a limited lens,” Jones said. “I’m sure the Emancipation Proclamation is discussed, but Juneteenth is not talked about. That’s something we feel needs to be changed … It does need more attention in the educational system and it does need recognition as a national holiday.”Texas, which made Juneteenth a state holiday in 1980, became the first of 47 states and Washington, D.C. to officially recognize or observe Juneteenth statewide. Hawaii, North Dakota, and South Dakota are the only states that still do not.On Wednesday, the governors of New York and Virginia announced that they will propose legislation to make Juneteenth a paid holiday for state employees starting in 2021.And companies including Nike and Twitter have become the first to make Juneteenth a paid company holiday.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Whicker: Justifying the lonely Cy Young ballot for Hyun-Jin Ryu

first_img Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco At that point, the Dodgers’ left-hander had an ERA of 1.45, ridiculously low in this day and time. He had given up no home runs in July. Not only that, he had a lead in the ERA race that would have been the largest in modern baseball history had he maintained it.He had become a southpaw Greg Maddux, outfoxing the hitters with an endless pitch mix and drone-caliber location. He was not a strikeout generator like deGrom, with 163 for the season, but his strikeout/walk ratio was 6.79, ahead of deGrom’s 5.80 and behind leader Scherzer’s 7.31.By then the Dodgers were deep into the recreational phase of their season. On Aug. 17, they were 18-1/2 games ahead in the NL West. They had already conducted an experiment with Joc Pederson at first base. The burning question was whether, or when, rookie Gavin Lux was going to make it to Dodger Stadium.So Ryu had four tough starts. He didn’t make it through the sixth inning in any of them and had a 9.93 ERA. That only inflated his season ERA to 2.45.Then he gave up three runs in his final three starts of the year, going seven innings in each, and wound up winning the ERA title. One was a classic matchup with deGrom in which Ryu shut out the Mets through seven, but the Dodgers lost 3-0.Had the voting happened in mid-August, Ryu not only would have been the only real contender for the Cy Young but probably would have deserved Most Valuable Player as well. After all, he had been the ultimate outlier, bulletproof in a year of record offense.So to deprive Ryu of the Cy Young because of four games that meant approximately as much as a G-League exhibition seemed a little silly.Related Articles How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Flaherty enjoyed one of the best second halves in the history of pitching and ranked first in WHIP and batting average-against. Strasburg led the league in innings, or in recording outs. Scherzer led the NL in quality-starts percentage, keeping the Nationals in a position to win 79 percent of the time.DeGrom led the league with 255 strikeouts and ranked second in ERA (to Ryu) and in WHIP (to Flaherty). He also led the NL in lowest OPS-against and on-base-percentage against.After July, deGrom had 15 starts and got 21 outs in 13 of them. His ERA dipped from 3.32 to 2.43 and he was 7-1 in that stretch. He alone couldn’t get the Mets into the postseason, but this is not the Most Valuable Pitcher award.So why Ryu?Go back to Aug. 11. And, yeah, Ryu was 14-5. Win-loss records aren’t everything. They’re not nothing. To pitch 29 times as a starter and get the loss only five times is worth something.Baseball is a slave to numbers, of course, but there’s no reason its evaluators have to be. When you’re comparing a pitcher with a 0.910 WHIP to one with a 0.927, is that a distinction without a difference. Are we dealing with one extra baserunner over a three-game stretch?Ryu was 13th in innings pitched, which was a function of that August vacation as well as the Dodgers’ cautionary approach. He hadn’t pitched 150 since 2014. And he walked 24 batters all season.As one might imagine, a Twitter riot burst out from Queens on Thursday when the voting came out. Accusations of homerism came my way, which must have amused those who were just as savage in 2012 when I voted Miguel Cabrera over Mike Trout for AL Most Valuable Player.Whether a baseball award should trigger the same intensity as a death-penalty debate is a question for another day. In the end, the Dodgers would have popped champagne if you’d told them in March that Ryu would be a Cy Young runner-up. And they did. Once, anyway.center_img There were six deserving candidates for the 2019 National League Cy Young Award. Maybe at some point they’ll go to Hall of Fame rules and give out six awards, for meritorious service.Until that dreaded day arrives, only one man wins.Jacob deGrom of the Mets got 29 of 30 first-place votes to take the Cy for the second consecutive year. Hyun-Jin Ryu got the 30th vote, from yours truly.Stephen Strasburg, Jack Flaherty, Max Scherzer and Kirby Yates had cases to state. It was notable, for instance, that Yates gave up two home runs all season, as San Diego’s closer, in the year of the souvenir. Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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Westminster Dog Show prize money: How much do the winners make in 2020?

first_imgIn case it wasn’t obvious already, showing dogs is rather cost-prohibitive.Here’s everything to know about the Westminster Dog Show prize money for 2020, including how much it costs to enter the competition and buy tickets.Westminster Dog Show purse for 2020There’s no money on the line at the Westminster Dog Show. In fact, most dog shows don’t reward prize money, but that doesn’t stop the human contestants from spending up to $250,000 a year to compete. How much does the Best in Show winner make?The dog that wins Best in Show is probably a very good boy or girl, but that does not mean it earns any money. The Best in Show at the Westminster Dog Show does typically does go on to compete in some of the more lucrative dog shows later in the year, including the AKC National Championship, which awards $50,000 to its champion. Who won Westminster Dog Show in 2019?Kingarthur Van Foliny Home (a.k.a. “King”), a wire fox terrier, won Best in Show in 2019. Much like his owner, Victor Malzoni Jr., King received no money for the honor.How much does it cost to enter a dog in the Westminster Dog Show?According to GOBankingRates, the entry fee to the Westminster Dog Show is $100. Of course, most of the cost of owning and competing a show dog comes outside of the entry fees. The dogs themselves are extremely pricey to own and maintain.How much is a ticket to the Westminster Dog Show?Prices vary depending on the event and day. For some of the weekend events, prices are as low as $22 for adults and $10 for children. But for the main events Monday and Tuesday night, it will cost $40 per night (or $75 for both nights) for general admission, and $65 per night for reserved seating at Madison Square Garden. Competing in the Westminster Dog Show is a labor of love.The winning dogs at the Westminster Dog Show don’t receive any money, and neither do their owners.last_img read more

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How to Get Green and Opt Out of Phone Books and…

first_imgOpt out of catalogs: Catalog Choice offers a quick and easy way to opt out of catalog mailings. Just go to www.CatalogChoice.org to set up an account. Once you receive your password via e-mail, you can browse by catalog names from the huge list and start deleting. The program is offered by the Ecology Center, a California-based organization that promotes sustainable living. Submitted by Thurston County Solid WasteSigning up for opt out lists is a quick and easy way to reduce wasteSummer is in full swing with all the familiar sights and sounds, including this year’s crop of phone books in yellow plastic bags that sprout up next to area mailboxes. But each year more and more phone books go unused and unwanted—that’s a lot of wasted water, paper and energy that all too often ends up as roadside litter.Wouldn’t it be great if you could clear out the clutter in and around your mailbox? With just a few clicks of the computer mouse, you too can get green and reduce waste by opting out of receiving phone books and other junk mail.Opt out of phone books: Eliminating several phone books at once is as simple as going to www.YellowPagesOptOut.com. Once you create an account, you can click on the local directories that you no longer wish to receive. Be sure to share this tip with your neighbors as well. Opt out of “junk mail” and marketing mail lists: A good way to remove your name from several national mailing lists at once is to sign up for the Direct Marketing Association’s Mail Preference Service at www.DMAchoice.org. This website provides instructions on how to register online or via U.S. mail. This service is only for national mailing lists (not local) and only for residential addresses (not business addresses). The service is good for five years.If you receive a phone book or see unused and unwanted phone books in your neighborhood, don’t let them become litter—the phone books are recyclable in your curbside bin, but be sure to remove the plastic bag first.For more waste prevention ideas, visit www.ThurstonSolidWaste.org.center_img Facebook151Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

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Canada Geese Hunting Season Underway

first_imgBy Jay Cook |RUMSON –For many, Sept. 1 meant the start of a relaxing Labor Day Weekend. But for avid waterfowl hunters, that Friday marked the start of a full month reserved for hunting Canada geese.In September, hunters can take advantage of lax regulations and high bag limits for harvesting the big, black-necked resident birds with the distinctive honking call.While pretty to look at when they fly across the sky in a v-shaped formation, hunters and conservationists believe their high numbers on land are causing harm to the local environment.“It’s like any species that gets out of control or unbalanced within nature,” said Joe DeMartino, a sitting member on New Jersey’s Fish and Game Council. “And right now, the hunters are trying to do their part.”DeMartino is also a member of Ocean County Ducks Unlimited, a local branch of the nonprofit waterfowl conservation organization. He said the state estimates over 200,000 Canada geese live year-round in New Jersey.For the strictly Canada goose hunting season spanning the month of September, hunters can harvest up to 15 birds per day. They are allowed to hunt with unplugged shotguns (no more than seven shells) and electronic calls, and hunting is permitted from a half hour before sunrise until a half hour after sunset for all of September, according to New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection guidelines. Hunters also must not discharge their weapon within 450 feet of an occupied dwelling, and must hunt below the high tide water mark.With the overpopulation of resident Canada geese comes a number of different issues that can be bothersome to residents.“They reproduce in great numbers here, and since they’re no longer migrating, they’ve exceeded the capacity for the habitat to really carry them in a way that doesn’t impact other species,” said Colette Buchanan, president of Monmouth County Audubon Society.While Buchanan agreed the population has become burdensome, she says the bigger issue is what Canada geese can do to small and large bodies of water. Their excessive fecal matter “works its way into the rivers, ponds, and lakes mostly by runoff from rain.”From that, Buchanan said the feces quickly pollute the water and make a once flourishing environment nearly uninhabitable for smaller animals and fish.Canada geese are generally found around two specific areas – resting on expansive fields while they graze and eat, and in bodies of water where they go to relax, according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.One of the few locations in Monmouth County where large areas of grass meet in close proximity to waterways is along the Navesink and Shrewsbury Rivers, surrounding the Two River peninsula. The spacious properties and tamed lawns along the riverside provide a nearly perfect habitat for the birds to eat and take a breather.That combination also makes for a near perfect location for hunters to capitalize on.Cory Wingerter, a Fair Haven native, said he couldn’t think of a better way to spend the day than goose or duck hunting. Although he hasn’t been out in a few years, he said he still remembers some of the best spots.“In my opinion, the Shrewsbury is better,” he candidly said. “I have not been in the Shrewsbury or Navesink for some time, but for a while I was going out every single weekend. And the nastier the weather, the better.”Rumson Borough Police Chief Scott Paterson, an avid hunter with Monmouth County Ducks Unlimited, was a bit evasive when asked his favorite hunting locations.“Let’s just say that both rivers, when the weather is conducive, can be productive,” Paterson said, being careful not to give too much away.With Rumson set between both rivers, it hosts the most potential shoreline hunting in the area. And Paterson said he has seen a fair share of Canada geese in town.“There’s a resident population in every town in New Jersey,” he said. “It’s obviously become a bit of a problem in the parks and whatnot, but as long the people harvesting these birds utilize them and consume them, I’m all good with it.”And these hunters certainly do eat what they take from the environment. DeMartino said Canada goose cooks like, and is similar in texture and taste to, steak, although he personally likes his as a sausage or brined and made into a corned beef.Wingerter said he likes to “breast them out,” and then either go with an easy stew or sauté.Considering the time of year, as the usual waterfowl hunting season is on the cusp of opening, residents should not be overly worried if they hear gunshots in the distance, Paterson said. If people have concerns, Paterson urged residents to call and be safe. Although most times, it’s a responsible hunter on the water.Paterson said hunting in those two waterways is “no different than people Jet-Skiing or using the water as they see fit.”“Once it’s explained to (residents) that it’s the start of a specific season, most understand it’s a legal hobby to participate in,” the police chief continued.And following the rules and regulations is important to keeping the season open for new hunters every year. Responsible conservation through responsible hunting is something the hunters are trying to achieve during this annual special Canada goose season.Paterson said it’s an important part of hunting in the Two River area, especially to cull the resident Canada goose population.“Hunters, first and foremost, are conservationists,” he said.The state’s primary waterfowl hunting season for ducks and brant in the Coastal Zone is open from Nov. 9 through Nov. 11, and then again from Nov. 23 through Jan. 27. The Canada goose season – not resident geese – is open from Nov. 9 through Nov. 11, and also from Nov. 18 through Feb. 15. Youth hunting days open on Nov. 4 and Feb 10. For more information about waterfowl hunting in New Jersey, visit the Division of Fish and Wildlife website.This article was first published in the Sept. 7-14, 2017 print edition of the Two River Times.last_img read more

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Ex-Nelsonite Sookro sinks Leafs in overtime

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsFor the second consecutive night a player with ties to the Heritage City came back to haunt the Nelson Leafs.Nelson Minor Hockey grad Ryon Sookro scored early in overtime to power the visiting Beaver Valley Nitehawks to a 2-1 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League victory over the Leafs Saturday night at the NDCC Arena.The win was the fifth in six attempts for the Hawks, who have outscored the Leafs 24-13 this season.Friday, the one-two combo of Dane Rupert and Landon Andrusiak, who played last season in Nelson, combined for seven points to help the Kelowna Chiefs skate to an 8-6 win.Saturday it was a goaltender’s duel between Marcus Beesley in the Nelson nets and Zack Perehudoff. Beaver Valley took a 1-0 into the first period intermission when Ryan Edwards beat Beesley from the edge of the goal crease.Nelson defenceman Braeden Hikichi tied the game in the second with an assist from Colton Schell.The Leafs, holding a 9-5 shots advantage in the third period and 21-17 in the game, pushed for the victory but could not beat Perehudoff.The loss all but ended Nelson’s bid to overtake Beaver Valley in the Murdoch Division standings. The Hawks now hold an eight-point lead over the Leafs. Beaver Valley also has played one fewer game.However, Nelson still holds a glimmer of hope if the Leafs can sweep a season-ending series next weekend.Saturday, the Hawks once again invade the NDCC Arena before the teams hook up Sunday, January 31 in Fruitvale.LEAFS BANTER: Ryon Sookro leads the Hawks in goals (23) and points (46). The 19-year-old native of South Slocan decided to play for the Hawks after failing to catch on last season with the Leafs. . . .Nelson, third in the Murdoch Division with a 22-17-0-3 record, has eight games remaining on the schedule. . . .Nelson plays host to Castlegar Rebels Tuesday at the NDCC Arena. . . .The game was slugged International Night as the hockey team welcomed visiting students attending school in the Heritage [email protected]last_img read more

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