Petrilli Joins Football Coaching Staff

first_img“I’m excited to have Coach Petrilli join us here at Drake. Chris brings a wealth of experiences with him that will enhance our program as well as an infectious enthusiasm for coaching,” said Fox. Prior to joining the coaching ranks, Petrilli served in the U.S. Military as a member of the elite military forces, serving as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, N.C., before receiving an honorable discharge. Petrilli spent four years at Eagle High School in Idaho, serving as the running backs and returners coach. During his time at EHS, the Mustangs achieved back-to-back Idaho championship appearances, winning the state title in 2009. Petrilli also coached four running backs that went on to play at the collegiate level. Prior to going to the College of Idaho, Petrilli coached at Charleston Southern University in 2012. While at CSU, he coached the wide receivers and assisted in all aspects of special teams. Before joining the Broncos, Petrilli was special teams, defensive backs and conditioning coach at the College of Idaho from 2013 to 2014. DES MOINES, Iowa – Drake University head football coach Rick Fox has announced an addition to his staff with the hiring of Chris Petrilli as assistant defensive backs coach.center_img Petrilli graduated from Boise State in 2012, earning his degree in economics. Petrilli spent last season at Boise State serving as the Broncos’ special teams and defensive quality control coach.  Print Friendly Version Petrilli played football at Carroll College in Helena, Mont. During his time with the Fighting Saints, he contributed in all three phases of the game, spending time at free safety and wide receiver, as well as special teams.last_img read more

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Burning Plants Tell Seeds When to Germinate

first_img(Visited 498 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Forest fire ash is not all useless.  It contains signaling molecules that can switch on the next generation of plants.How is it that in the spring following a forest fire, the ground comes alive with a profusion of new seedlings?  How do the seeds, which may have lain dormant in the soil for years, know that the ground has been cleared, providing opportunities for a new generation of growth?An open-access paper in PNAS describes how a molecule in the ash of plants after a forest fire turns on growth in dormant seeds.  According to the paper, “Germination-stimulating compounds, generated in the smoke of burning plants, include a seed dormancy–breaking compound” called karrikin-1.  The scientists studied what this molecule does to a seed.  Inside the seed is a protein, KAI2, that has a receptor for karrikin-1.  When the key fits the lock, the protein changes shape, switching on a message cascade that tells the side to prepare for sprouting.A Salk Institute press release,”Smoke signals: How burning plants tell seeds to rise from the ashes,” summarizes the findings:“This is a very important and fundamental process of ecosystem renewal around the planet that we really didn’t understand,” says co-senior investigator Joseph P. Noel, professor and director of Salk’s Jack H. Skirball Center for Chemical Biology and Proteomics. “Now we know the molecular triggers for how it occurs.”Noel’s co-senior investigator on the project, Joanne Chory, professor and director of Salk’s Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory, says the team found the molecular “wake-up call” for burned forests. “What we discovered,” she says, “is how a dying plant generates a chemical message for the next generation, telling dormant seeds it’s time to sprout.“The original paper didn’t say anything about how evolution produced this signaling system, but the press release took a stab at it:“In plants, one member of this family of enzymes has been recruited somehow through natural selection to bind to this molecule in smoke and ash and generate this signal,” says Noel, holder of Salk’s Arthur and Julie Woodrow Chair and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. “KAI2 likely evolved when plant ecosystems started to flourish on the terrestrial earth and fire became a very important part of ecosystems to free up nutrients locked up in dying and dead plants.”The researchers never explained how this recruitment “likely evolved.”  It was just “somehow.”Another article on Live Science about plant ecology states that aerosols produced by plants can modulate global climate.  “Plants release gases such as water vapor and oxygen; these combine with the aerosols released from plants to form larger airborne particles that reflect sunlight and form cloud droplets.”  The pleasing scent of a forest comes from these aerosols.The Salk press release provides a good example of how evolution pretends to be scientific while only gesticulating (hand-waving) in fantasyland.  The science about karrikins and KAI2 has nothing to do with evolution; it’s just good old observational, reproducible experimentation.  The evolution stuff was just tacked on at the end.  But look at it!  An enzyme has been “recruited somehow through natural selection,” we are told.  OK, how?  “Somehow.”  It just evolved.  How do you know it evolved?  It “likely evolved.”  Is this somehow likely?  No; it’s not even likely somehow. Proteins and enzymes are highly complicated living machines that defy origin by chance (see online book).But even if in someone’s wildest imagination KAI2 “emerged” somehow, unlikely as it is, getting it to do anything requires a whole system of other proteins, enzymes and genes to interact with it for a functional purpose.  When these scientists asserted it is “somehow…likely” that natural selection (an aimless, purposeless process) accomplished this without meaning to, they did BAD (Bald Assertion of Darwinism).  They abandoned all pretense of science.  They are just gesticulating, speculating, confabulating, somnabulating, absquatulating out of their own imaginations, where miracles of emergence happen when they wish upon a star.Everyone, therefore—even Darwinians—believes in miracles and the supernatural.  Some can defend their beliefs with reason and evidence.  Others, like these Darwin addicts, just blow smoke and hot air.last_img read more

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Overlooker

first_imgI’m a young man of twentyseven years. I’m concerned citizen who hails from The Eastern Cape but I’m in gauteng.As I was watching the world and our country fighting against xenophobia it came to my concern that why cnt I start my organisation in helping the government to fight this campaign of fighting this underage/illegal circumcision in our beautiful country as it is getting out of hand.The department is doing its best but it’s still extending so it’s my wish to play my part and work with the government as an overlooker whenever it’s being performed around the country.So I’m pleading with this organisation and the health department to help me play my part in our beatiful country as our brothers are dying every season. Let us unite in arms maAfrica.Blakie masixole.Name: Masixole BlakieEmail address: [email protected] Telephone: 073 265 0691last_img read more

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Brand SA and Muslim Judicial Council to highlight religious tolerance in South Africa

first_imgBrand South Africa and the Muslim Judicial Council discuss their collaboration. From left, Thoko Modise, Manager: Civil Society, Brand South Africa; MI Abdul Khaliq Allie, Secretary General, Muslim Judicial Council; Sithembile Ntombela, General Manager: Marketing, Brand South Africa; Shaykh Achmat Sedick, Director, Muslim Judicial Council; and Dr Petrus de Kock, General Manager: Research, Brand South Africa.Brand South Africa and the Muslim Judicial Council have entered into an agreement to work together to tell the good story of religious tolerance in South Africa, following a meeting in late February to discuss collaboration between the two organisations.South Africa’s Muslim Judicial Council, or MJC, is a non-profit faith-based organisation established in 1945. It is one of the country’s oldest, most representative and most influential religious organisations and enjoys local and international credibility.The MJC Halaal Trust is a major role-player in the positive promotion of and orientation on halal lifestyle for South African Muslims, specifically, and other communities, globally.The MJC is founded on the values of Ubuntu and tolerance, and speaks to South Africa’s motto of unity in diversity.A diverse but integrated societyOften referred to as the “rainbow nation”, South Africa is home to a fascinating mix of people. We are Africans, and people of European, Asian and mixed-race descent, enjoying hybrid mixtures of different cultures. But our overarching South African culture ensures that, no matter what a person’s heritage, they are, at heart, proudly South African.Indeed, as South Africa’s democracy evolves, it is becoming a more diverse but integrated country. Cultural diversity continues to be one of its strongest assets.MJC and Brand South Africa: the alignmentThe MJC’s alignment to the country’s values and ethos makes its fit with Brand South Africa more natural. While religious tolerance is a challenge in many countries, it is a success story in South Africa.Another of South Africa’s successes is not widely told: its important role in peacekeeping elsewhere on the African continent.Following the agreement, Brand South Africa will work with the MJC to promote the good story of religious tolerance in South Africa, a story that will contribute positively to the country’s reputation.The two organisations have agreed to collaborate on future stakeholder engagements, particularly international delegation strategic platforms.last_img read more

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The politics and economics of crop insurance in 2018

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Crop insurance critics have a blind spot.That sentiment comes from former Risk Management Agency (RMA) Administrator Kenneth Ackerman, who is now an Of Counsel attorney at OFW Law, concentrating his practice on Federal crop insurance and agriculture programs.“Crop insurance is a very important part of the farm bill and one of the very few issues that almost everyone in the farm community agrees on,” Ackerman said. “It’s grown substantially over the past few years and as a result it’s become something of a target.”Crop insurance is the largest core agriculture support programs with an estimated price tag of $7.7 billion per year, which has the attention of budget cutters’ in Washington.“Over the last several cycles of farm bills and appropriations bills, we have seen people looking to take money away from crop insurance to spend someplace else,” Ackerman said. “We’ve already seen for 2018 a number of reports coming out of different ‘think tanks’ suggesting cuts to crop insurance. It will almost inevitably be a subject of discussion.”Prior to the 1990s, the crop insurance program was very small, with about a quarter of the participation and a tenth of the guarantees of today. As a result, when a large disaster would hit, farmers were dependent for their livelihoods on politicians in Washington scrambling to get an ad hoc bailout package through Congress.“Beyond the uncertainty created by these ad hoc disaster bills, there were a lot of problems with administering them,” Ackerman said. “They had to be put in place with little notice and little infrastructure and that resulted in mistakes being made and program abuses which created controversy about these bailouts.”Crop insurance was built on a business basis, which offers something more stable, predictable and dependable to farmers today.“FCIC crop insurance, unlike disaster aid, is a business model that rewards farmers for being good managers and good businessmen,” Ackerman said. “Farmers purchase their coverage, paying good money from their own pockets, yes at subsidized rates, but still large enough to force them to make serious choices about risk. Producers who keep good production records enjoy better guarantees, and those who incorporate crop insurance into business plans linked with credit, banking, precision agriculture, and related risk-management tools like forward contracting and futures and options, do even better.”As the 2018 Farm Bill begins to take shape, Ackerman says it’s important that farmers stay on top of the rhetoric in Washington and speak up if crop insurance is an important part of their operation.“Once the agriculture committees finish their work on the core program, it is going to be very important for the farm community to be united,” Ackerman said. “There will be people who oppose the program for reasons that have nothing to do with agriculture, but have more to do with competing interests from other parts of the country.”Like farmers, many agribusinesses are also keeping a close eye on the progress of the 2018 Farm Bill and the role crop insurance will play in it.“Crop insurance is a public/private partnership that works really well,” said Jason Alexander, Senior Vice President of Insurance Services with Farm Credit Mid-America. “When the farmer pays that premium, they save taxpayers money in the long run. There could be tweaks but we are confident that there won’t be drastic changes to the program that could affect the risk pool and, in turn, affect the way producers buy crop insurance.”There may be some changes in the way producers buy crop insurance in 2018, but it will have nothing to do with policy. Farm economics may have some growers looking for ways to save money with different coverage plans and options. Alexander says looking at crop insurance as a cost savings may not be the most prudent approach.“I encourage producers to look at crop insurance from a ‘how much risk can I bear’ and start at the other end of that spectrum,” Alexander said. “Producers have made less money, most have burned through a lot of working capital and so their risk-bearing capacity has become less. So, I think you start at the opposite end of that and say ‘If another 2012 happens, what does that mean for me and what type of policy should I have in place to keep farming?’”Alexander recommends not being short-sighted and trying to save a dollar or two on the premium here or there and lower your level of coverage.“That might make a little sense to save a little money, but if you play out those worst case scenarios the outcome is much different than it was just seven years ago,” Alexander said. “We’re seeing a lot of farmers looking to increase their coverage levels to be able to withstand that additional risk that many farmers are currently facing.”last_img read more

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Driving to Maximize Your Fuel Economy

first_imgIn this column I usually focus on how to save energy in our homes and businesses, but for many of us, getting around is our largest energy consumer—particularly in the summer months when we’re not heating our houses. Some of us are lucky enough to have hybrid cars, and this gives us a head start in saving transportation energy. I just calculated that the 2003 Honda Civic Hybrid we own, which averages about 40 miles per gallon (mpg) year-round, has saved us about 2,800 gallons of gas over the 146,000 miles we’ve driven it (compared with a car getting the U.S. average of 22.5 mpg)–worth $7,000 with gasoline at $2.50 per gallon.But for those who don’t have a Toyota Prius, Honda Insight, or other hybrid, there are some simple ways to significantly reduce fuel consumption. It’s easy to find tips for more efficient driving, but some of the more extreme strategies have come out of the hypermiling movement. In 2006, Wayne Gerdes coined the term “hypermiling” to describe the goal of exceeding the published EPA fuel economy ratings of cars—especially hybrids. Details of this practice can be found at Gerdes’s website: CleanMPG.com.Through hypermiling techniques, some hybrid car owners have been able to coax their mileage to over 100 mpg, and they compete with one another for boasting rights. Using the same techniques, drivers of conventional cars have been able to increase their fuel economy by as much as 50%–sometimes matching that of hybrid vehicles.While hypermiling has become a sort-of game for some drivers, for the rest of us the strategies they use to squeeze more miles out of a gallon of gasoline can help us save a lot of money—even if we don’t go to the same extremes. Below I’ve listed a few of these hypermiling strategies. Look for more tips next week.1. Slow down. A physicist will tell you that the power required to overcome aerodynamic drag (wind resistance) increases as a cube of the velocity being traveled. This is the main reason (there are others) that at higher speeds, your fuel economy drops. A September 2009 Consumer Reports blog reported the fuel economy of a 2.5-liter, 4-cylinder Toyota Camry driven at 55 mph to be 40.3 mpg, while at 65 mph the fuel economy dropped to 34.9, and driven at 75 mph it dropped to 29.8 mpg—26 percent lower than at 55 mph. Our Honda has a digital fuel economy read-out, so I can see this effect very directly. On a trip when I’m running late to the airport and driving at 70 mph, my fuel economy may drop to 35 mpg, but on the return drive, if I keep the car to 55 (or even lower), I can get well over 50 mpg.2. Avoid aggressive driving. Rapid (jack rabbit) starts and hard braking can reduce fuel economy by one-third, compared with more sensible driving. In his widely read 2006 article on hypermiling, Gerdes suggested that “you drive as if you do not have brakes.” If you knew that your brakes weren’t working, you’d leave extra space between your car and the one in front, and you’d coast to a stop for traffic lights and stop signs; these techniques will save a lot of fuel.3. Avoid cold stops—safely. Your car uses a lot more fuel when starting from a complete stop so, when you have a choice, avoid coming totally to rest. When approaching a traffic light that’s red, for example, slow down so that you’re still moving when it turns green. Don’t violate laws or put yourself (or others) at risk in doing this, however. This isn’t a suggestion to roll through stop signs, or slow down so much when approaching a light that the driver behind you will try to unsafely pass you.4. Remove roof racks when not needed. Anything that increases aerodynamic drag will reduce your fuel economy. I do a lot of paddling, for example, but I always take the canoe racks off our car when we don’t need them. Even a flag flying from your radio antenna will lower your fuel economy by as much as a mile per gallon—which is why it was ironic when, after 9/11, so many drivers sported large American flags on their antennas to demonstrate their patriotism. (By flying those flags as they cruised down the highway, they used more gasoline, increasing our dependence on oil imported from unstable parts of the world, and indirectly at least, putting more money into the coffers of some foreign entities that may have funded the very terrorism these flag-flying patriots were protesting.)In addition to this Energy Solutions blog, Alex writes the weekly blog on BuildingGreen.com: Alex’s Cool Product of the Week, which profiles an interesting new green building product each week. You can sign up to receive notices of these blogs by e-mail—enter your e-mail address in the upper right corner of any blog page.Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, LLC and executive editor of Environmental Building News. To keep up with his latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed.last_img read more

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Can Enterprise Tech Avoid The Fate Of The Automobile Industry?

first_imgIT + Project Management: A Love Affair “Only the paranoid survive” – Former Intel CEO Andy GroveThings seem so good in the enterprise technology universe right now it is a little scary. The IT transition to cloud/mobile/social has entrepreneurs and investors salivating, with three significant forces at work:Real, not PowerPoint, multi-billion dollar opportunities are emerging for new entrantsIT buyers have new productivity options for workers and better values for their operating and capital spending Incumbents are getting needed wake up calls on their technologies and business models.So why am I nervous?The Detroit SyndromeForty years ago, the Middle East oil embargo ripped a hole the size of a Buick through the American automotive industry. Over the following decades, the Big 3 automakers suffered huge market share losses, two major bankruptcies and government bailouts. Smaller, cheaper and more fuel-efficient cars from Japan broke the Detroit oligopoly and proved not everyone wanted big, powerful sedans, powered by a Detroit’s V8s.As David Halberstam documented in The Reckoning, hubris and management blindness led to an enormous transfer of value from American to international car manufacturers. In 2012, the American auto industry had a $140 billion trade deficit. That’s like Apple losing everything.Tech Drives Today’s EconomyToday, tech is a huge growth driver of the U.S. economy. Millions of jobs – not just in Silicon Valley but across the U.S. – directly depend on it. And that’s just the beginning: Enrico Moretti of UC Berkeley estimates that 1 job in traditional manufacturing generates 1.6 additional jobs, but one job in tech generates closer to 5 incremental jobs.But the last heyday of enterprise IT crested around 2000, as “CIO as rock star” gave way to “CIO as cost center.” IT spending in the developed world has been basically flat ever since.5 Challenges For Enterprise TechnologyAnd now, enterprise technology faces an incredibly complex series of challenges and opportunities:1. Customer Collaboration is Reducing Switching Costs. The IT industry has long relied on vendor-led standards bodies (IETF, IEEE) to ensure interoperability, but the dramatic growth of customer-led collaborative efforts in the open source and cloud movements is reworking the playing field. Rackspace-led OpenStack and Facebook-led Open Compute initiatives are cookbooks for the commoditization of IT infrastructure. If low-cost producers take over the infrastructure business, they will likely come from offshore producers (China, India, etc.) and not U.S. manufacturers. And don’t forget GitHub if you are in the software business.2. The Cloud and the Rental Economy. The tremendous cost, energy, speed and operational savings presented by Cloud and SaaS technologies are changing how we think about IT. Why buy from HP or Oracle when you can rent from Amazon or Workday? Why let capacity sit idle when you can pay for it as you need it? This is a good thing, as resources will be used more efficiently. But it poses challenges for enterprise tech vendors. “We are one or two amortization cycles away” from the coming drop-off of premise-based IT purchases, warns Lightspeed Ventures’ Tim Danford.3. BYOD and BYOA. The verdict is in: IT managers are coping, sometimes kicking and screaming, with the influx of customer-purchased devices as corporate computing platforms (Bring Your Own Device). The next wave of mobile challenges will come from BYOA (Bring Your Own Applications), where applications like Evernote and Box replace popular Microsoft programs like Sharepoint or even the Office suite. The classic enterprise software license could be a few apps away from oblivion.4. The Lean Vendor. User-led IT communities like Spiceworks are replacing how buyers learn about products and services. Tech marketing is becoming a content and education task, not a promotional activity. This is giving the high-touch (read high cost) sales and marketing models of traditional vendors a run for the money. Companies like Ubiquiti Networks are not only taking advantage of this new buying behavior, they are passing on their own lowered selling, general and administrative (SG&A) costs to customers in the form of great technology and user-friendly innovation at lower prices. As a CIO friend of mine once told me: “When you walk into a vendor’s offices and they’re nicer than your own, remember you paid for it.”5. Distributed Computing Model. Current computing models are built around a central premise: a client (e.g., Microsoft) will talk to a server (x86, IBM) in a single location to process an application. If you own either end of the equation, you can exact enormous value. But the cloud architecture is massively distributed, apps might have to touch dozens of places to process everything, totally disrupting that vendorscape. More significantly, the new in-demand IT skills sets look less like a traditional Fortune 500 corporation and more like Google or Facebook. Distributed computing scientists are this generation’s Einsteins.3 Ways To Save Enterprise TechIn Silicon Valley, it’s easy to assume the next generation of giants will grow just down the street. But the rest of the world is working to take advantage of the same trends while eyeing the large and relatively wide-open U.S. market.I for one do not want to wake up in a decade and buy a book charting the downfall of the American technology industry by the next David Halberstam. Here’s what has to happen for the enterprise technology industry to avoid The Detroit Syndrome:1. Incumbents need to blow up their own business models before challengers do it for them. The first wave of Detroit’s reaction to the initial oil-shock resulted in half-baked responses like the Ford Pinto, Chevy Vega and AMC Gremlin. And what did the auto industry do when oil prices moderated in the late 1980s and early 1990s? They went back to promoting horsepower instead of fuel efficiency and rolled out fleets of gas-guzzling SUVs that were great for short-term profits but made them even more vulnerable to the next oil shocks.2. Some of today’s startups must grow into the new giants. While there are many enterprise tech vendors in $500 million to $5 billion range, few new suppliers have cracked the $10 billion run rate as independent companies. Large tech companies play a critical role in the IT economy, but customers must use their wallets to keep their own ecosystems healthy by fostering competition and innovations.3. Systemic security and privacy solutions must be found. Buyer confidence could be torpedoed by cybercrime and careless data leakage. It will take a range of enabling technologies to give enterprise buyers more purchase confidence to embrace innovation.Enterprise tech is not the Rust Belt, not by a long shot. There is every possibility that the technology industry will not go the way of the automobile industry. But the seeds of our growth could also be the seeds of our decay. And the ability to thrive requires innovations in our minds as much as our technologies. In the words of Mark Twain: “Circumstances make man, not man circumstances.”Image courtesy of Shutterstock. 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Related Posts alan s cohencenter_img Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Tags:#business last_img read more

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I was caught by surprise at Rajya Sabha nomination: Mary Kom

first_imgNew Delhi, Apr 23 (PTI) Left surprised by the Rajya Sabha nomination, star Indian woman boxer M C Mary Kom today said she does not have the time to think about her new role right now as her focus is on qualifying for the Olympics. London Olympics bronze-medallist Mary Kom said it was a great honour to be nominated for the Rajya Sabha but she would not put herself under pressure by thinking about the role she would play in the Parliament. “It was a great honour to be nominated for Rajya Sabha. It was a sudden development and I was surprised. When I was told that I would be nominated for the Rajya Sabha, I started thinking what would I do as an MP,” Mary Kom told reporters at an event to name Bollywood superstar Salman Khan as Goodwill Ambassador of the Indian contingent for the Rio Olympics. “I have not qualified for the Olympics yet and till I qualify for the Olympics, I am not going to think about what would be my role as a Parliamentarian. Doing that will put pressure on me in my effort for the Rio qualification. So, my sole focus is now to qualify for the Rio Olympics,” said the 33-year-old five-time world champion. Mary Kom could not qualify for the Rio Olympics during the Asian Championships earlier this month as she lost in the semifinals of the 51kg category. She has another chance to book a Rio berth in next months World Championships. When told that many a celebrities nominated to the Rajya Sabha did not perform their roles, with some not even attending the Parliament often, the Manipuri boxer said, “I know all those thing and I will attend to them later. It will be a kind of double task for me. I will see as the time comes.” Goaded by Salman about her plans as an MP, Mary Kom said, “I will try to do my best and work for the upliftment for Indian sports and sportspersons. I am a boxer but I will work for the betterment of all the sports.” On whether the nomination opens up the possibility of sequel to her hugely successful biopic, Mary Kom said, “I will perform all my roles in the Part 2 all alone. I will not give any role to anybody.” She thanked Salman for coming on board as the Goodwill Ambassador of the Indian Olympics contingent. “Salman bhai will inspire the Indian to do their best in the Olympics. His association will also raise the interest of the fans in the performance of Indian athletes in Olympic sports,” she said. PTI PDS PM PMadvertisementlast_img read more

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