Allahabad HC Issues Further Directions For Wearing Masks In Public Spaces; Resolves Conflict Between Jurisdiction Of Development Authorities & Local Municipal Authorities [Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesAllahabad HC Issues Further Directions For Wearing Masks In Public Spaces; Resolves Conflict Between Jurisdiction Of Development Authorities & Local Municipal Authorities [Read Order] Akshita Saxena9 Oct 2020 12:12 AMShare This – xThe Allahabad High Court on Wednesday issued detailed instructions to ensure that all persons, moving out into public places, wear masks. The Bench of Justices Siddhartha Varma and Ajit Kumar has also taken serious note of issue of unauthorized encroachment on public land that often invite large congregation of men and women in violation of the Covid-19 guidelines. The High Court…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Allahabad High Court on Wednesday issued detailed instructions to ensure that all persons, moving out into public places, wear masks. The Bench of Justices Siddhartha Varma and Ajit Kumar has also taken serious note of issue of unauthorized encroachment on public land that often invite large congregation of men and women in violation of the Covid-19 guidelines. The High Court has been emphasizing on the importance of wearing masks in public places, time and again. “No person should be seen outside his/ her house without a mask on his/her face and he or she should check that the mask covers both the nose and the mouth,” the High Court has previously remarked. ‘Even Police Personnel Outside Their Police Stations Are Not Wearing Masks’: Allahabad HC Expresses Displeasure At Shoddy Implementation Of Its Orders The High Court has now ordered: All Heads of the Department in the whole State of U.P. should send reminders to their employees that they and their family members have to compulsorily wear masks. This should be done on a daily basis.The State Police should itself wear masks religiously and also see that everyone in their vicinity wears the masks. Here it may be mentioned that the security personnel deputed outside the houses of various dignitaries have not been wearing their masks. They should wear their masks and also request people passing by them that they should also wear masks.All shops even other than eateries shall ensure that the customers/ individuals who enter their premises shall wear their masks at all times. Needless to say that non-wearing of masks would invite penalty and prosecution.The Advocate Commissioners appointed by this Court may continue to take photographs as have been taken by them in the past and the State Authority may take action on those photographs. Encroachment of public land Inter alia, the High Court has directed the Development Authority, Prayagraj to immediately proceed to remove all unauthorized encroachments from public road and road side land and other public places in the city, so as to prevent large congregations at these places. It further directed the Municipal Corporation and Police administration to render all necessary help in the anti-encroachment drive and to submit a report on the next date of hearing. Significantly, the High Court has repeatedly asked the local authorities to prevent encroachment of public land and the menace of parking. However, it noted that the issue is still looming as the Development authorities and the Municipal bodies have been “shifting their burden upon each other” citing various provisions of the UP Urban Planning & Development Act, 1973 and the UP Municipal Corporation Act, 1959. Deprecating the same, the Court was of the opinion that in case of any conflict, both the Acts have to be “read in harmony with each other” so that both the authorities shoulder their responsibilities in the larger public interest. “What is needed is the achievement of the objectives under both the Acts and thus there is a requirement of a harmonious construction of the two different sets of provisions under the two Acts of 1959 and 1973. We find the provisions to be supplemental to each other,” the Court said. The Court noted that the Acts of 1959 and 1973 do not overlap. It clarified: Development activities in the ‘development areas’ have to be carried out like by the Development Authorities. Such activities include: (i) carving out main public road and public land; (ii) inspection in development areas; (iii) action against unauthorized encroachers under Section 26A of the 1973 Act. The Municipal Corporation on the other hand is responsible for maintenance of (i)drainage, (ii) public street, (iii) maintenance of lanes and by-lanes in municipal areas, (iv) electricity poles and lighting etc. and so they have been vested with the powers to ensure removal of such unauthorized encroachments also. It further clarified, “In any development area if the municipal corporation has been working and the development activities have to be carried out as per the master plan and zonal development plan, then in our considered opinion both the development authorities as well as the municipal corporations have to act and aid each other to ensure that no public places, public roads or road side lands or public buildings are occupied by any person, be it by raising temporary or permanent structures or be it any violation of any development activity in an area notified under the Acts.” Besides this, the Court said, cleaning of road side land, management of parking of the vehicles in commercial areas of the city alongwith rehabilitation of the road side vendors/ street vendors in duly identified vending zones are a few other tasks which have to be accomplished by the various local administrative authorities in these days of the pandemic. Sanitizers The Court has further asked the State Government to clarify whether along with the license to manufacture and sale of sanitizer, any requirement is there to take licenses under the Drugs and Cosmetic Act, 1940 and the Drugs and Cosmetic Rules, 1945. The matter is now listed for hearing on October 14, 2020. Case Title: In-Re Inhuman Condition At Quarantine Centres… Click Here To Download Order Read Order Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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JERSEY CITY BRIEFS

first_img ×HONORING KING – Jersey City held its 23rd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Oratory Contest in honor of Black History Month on Feb. 26 in the City Hall council chambers. Six finalists from grade 3-5 and six from grades 6-8 recited portions of speeches given by The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Another scathing report on county jail detaineesA report issued by Human Rights First in late February highlighted continuing problems at the Hudson County Correctional Facility (HCCF) and other New Jersey jails that are holding federal immigration detainees.Earlier in February, Human Rights First (HRF) researchers visited the three principal facilities that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) uses to detain noncitizens in New Jersey: Elizabeth Contract Detention Facility, the Essex County Correctional Facility, and the Hudson County Correctional Facility.A team of legal and health professionals joined HRF staff on these visits, which included tours of the facilities, meetings with ICE and facility staff, and individual and group interviews with over one hundred detained immigrants. According to their report, HRF found at the Hudson facility several detained individuals working in the kitchens who complained that the food carts, trays, and dishes are frequently left unwashed, and when cleaned, dirty water is used to wash them. Also, garbage and food waste often remain on the plates and trays.The report said that individuals at all three facilities reported that food, particularly meat and rice, is often raw, spoiled, or expired.The report went on to say that detainees at the Hudson facility said that certain officers allow only English programs on the television, that most work positions are offered to English speakers, and that officers may restrict phone usage depending on the race of the detainee.Women at the Hudson facility complained about one officer who verbally assaults certain women and even restricts certain women from using the phone to call their attorneys, something that all detainees should have unrestricted access to.The report said that the Hudson facility has a high number of individuals with serious mental health concerns, as demonstrated by the three suicides that have occurred at the facility since January 2016 and 12 mental health hospitalizations in six months.The Hudson facility utilizes medical isolation rooms to house detained individuals placed on suicide watch. While on suicide watch, a detainee remains in his or her cell for 23 hours per day and is not permitted to have personal items, books, or magazines in the cell. The facility implemented new policies in an effort to respond to the three suicides since 2016.Hudson County has instituted a number of programs to address these issues, but the report appears to confirm that problems at the facility still exist. HONORING KING – Jersey City held its 23rd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Oratory Contest in honor of Black History Month on Feb. 26 in the City Hall council chambers. Six finalists from grade 3-5 and six from grades 6-8 recited portions of speeches given by The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.center_img Two more top JC officials leaveAmong the many changes marking Mayor Steven Fulop’s second term, two more key city officials are leaving city government.Business Administrator Bob Kakoleski has taken a job as Rutherford’s borough administrator. David Donnelly, director of the Jersey City Redevelopment Agency, has returned to a family-owned business in Texas.City officials said that assistants in both departments will do their work temporarily until their replacements can be found.These are the latest in a series of changes that include the reassignment of Corporation Counsel Jeremy Farrell to the Municipal Utility Authority and the reassignment of two deputy mayors. The city has also recently named a new recreation director, new fire chief, new police chief as well as other position changes. What happened at 111 First St.?David Goodwin, author of “The Left Bank of the Hudson: Jersey City and the Artists of 111 First Street,” will appear at Little City Books, 100 Bloomfield St. in Hoboken, on March 7 at 7 p.m.The book embraces art, real estate, development, the life and culture of a city, and also lots of drama, as you might expect from Hudson County politicians.In the late 1980s, a handful of artists priced out of Manhattan and desperately needing affordable studio space discovered 111 First St., a former P. Lorillard Tobacco Company warehouse. Over the next two decades, an eclectic collection of painters, sculptors, musicians, photographers, filmmakers, and writers dreamt and toiled within the building’s labyrinthine halls. The local arts scene flourished, igniting hope that Jersey City would emerge as the next grassroots center of the art world.However, a rising real estate market coupled with a provincial political establishment threatened the community at 111 First St. The artists found themselves entangled in a long, complicated, and vicious fight for their place in the building and for the physical survival of 111 First Street itself, a site that held so much potential, so much promise for Jersey City. “Left Bank of the Hudson” offers a window into the demographic, political, and socio-economic changes experienced by Jersey City during the last thirty years.Goodwin’s book is seen as a well-documented narrative about the role artists play in economically improving cities.JC to hold emissions auditMayor Steven M. Fulop signed a letter of commitment on Feb. 27 officially joining the City of Jersey City to the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy. With this commitment, Jersey City joins thousands of other cities across the globe in committing to aggressive, measurable action to address global climate change. As part of the Global Covenant of Mayors, Jersey City will conduct a thorough, city-wide greenhouse gas inventory, set public emissions targets, and develop a comprehensive plan to meet those targets.“Last year, I signed the Mayors Climate Commitment to uphold the goals set by the Paris Climate Agreement, after President Trump announced the United States’ withdrawal. This year I am honoring that pledge by committing to the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy as the next step in our mission to address climate change on a local level,” said Mayor Fulop. “At a time of federal inaction, it is up to city and local governments to fill the void. As a coastal city, Jersey City is threatened by climate change and it is time for us to take decisive action to improve our sustainability and protect our environment.”This commitment coincides with the launch of the City’s new Office of Sustainability, which will be dedicated to finding ways to improve the sustainability of the City’s operations, raise public awareness of sustainable practices, and implement policies across areas such as water, energy, transit, and development. The Office will be tasked with leading the Global Covenant of Mayors process for Jersey City.Little City presents ‘Read Across America’ Seuss-themed morning in the bookshopOn Sunday, March 4 at 11 a.m., Little City Books, 100 Bloomfield St. in Hoboken, presents free for kids of all ages the Garden Street School of the Performing Arts cast of “SEUSSICAL”.They will perform selections from the show in the bookshop. The cast will be on hand to buddy up and read to the children after the performance. Seuss swag, activities, and photo props and opps are all included. Children of all ages are welcome!For more information call (201) 626-7323 or visit littlecitybooks.com.NAMI offers program for caregiversNAMI Family-to-Family is a 12-week education program designed for caregivers having an adult family member living with a mental illness. The program fosters learning, healing and empowerment among caregivers and has been described by some as “a journey of hope” and by many others as “a life changing experience. Classes will meet April 5 through June 21 at Christ Hospital, 176 Palisade Ave., Jersey City, every Thursday evening 6:30 – 9 p.m. Participation is available on a first come basis and free parking is available.To register please contact Carmen at (201) 310-5828 or email [email protected], orDana at (347) 729-3966 or email at [email protected] early. Space is limited.City complies with lawsuit settlement on West Street developmentAfter taking its legal case to the New Jersey Supreme Court, the City Council voted on Feb. 28 to comply with a lower court that would vacate a portion of West Street to accommodate a new development project near Journal Square.The city attempted to reverse a 2012 settlement agreement that would allow a portion of West Street off Magnolia Avenue to be used for the construction of 42-story tower.Councilman Richard Boggiano spoke against the council move, vowing to continue the fight. He said the development had no place in a neighborhood that was largely made up of one and two family homes.The vote comes after Hudson County Superior Court ordered the city to vacate the street. Although other council members said they were also opposed to the move, to not comply would put the city in contempt of court.Jersey City Library March eventsJersey City Public Library will hold a number of events in the month of March.Five Corners will present Sayantani DasGupta, author of “The Serpent’s Secret,” a new middle-grade novel that’s based on Bengali folktales on Saturday, March 3 at 1 p.m.Test your knowledge of women’s history at West Bergen this month, and win prizes at our annual Women’s History Month Contest (Mon., Mar. 5 – Thurs., Mar. 29).The Heights Branch will host local veterinarian Julie Jones who will present Pet First Aid on Thursday March 8, at 6 p.m.Those living with or caring for those with hepatitis will have a chance to learn about different types of the disease and ask questions at a special Viral Hepatitis Learning Workshop presented by certified HCV educator Elena Bradshaw at the Miller Branch on Saturday, March. 10 at 11 a.m.The Greenville Library will host Misty Copeland, who made history as the first African-American principal dancer with the prestigious American Ballet Theatre, on Saturday March 17 at 2 p.m.Enjoy a special St. Patrick’s Day Celebration that’s all about Irish geography, culture, and food (Heights, Sat., March 17, 3 p.m.), and lots of St. Patrick’s Day Crafts (Bonetti, Cunningham, Greenville, Lafayette, Pavonia, West Bergen branches).For more information and directions go to: www.jclibrary.org.Student filmsThe HCCC Department of Cultural Affairs has a number of events coming up. Independent female filmmakers will also be celebrated in a series of films being presented from March 2 to April 28 by the Department of Cultural Affairs in collaboration with director Delaney Buffett.This is an all-star lineup of short films by female filmmakers which will be screened at the Dineen Hull Gallery Atrium.Film shorts include “First Match,” “Kid Warrior: The Xiuhtezcatl Martinez Story,” “New Deep South: Kayla,” “Run Mama Run” and “The Spring.” For more information email: [email protected]last_img read more

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Gold Coast apartments contributing to the average Australian home’s reduced size

first_imgAbout 27 per cent of new homes being built eight years ago were apartments but now they account for 46 per cent.REIQ Gold Coast zone chairman Andrew Henderson said the ageing population was also driving demand for apartments on the Coast.As apartment buildings skyrocketed in the city’s heart, Mr Henderson said many older homes in surrounding areas were being demolished so the blocks could be subdivided.“People want convenience and location,” he said.“(They want) to be close to shopping and transport.”Mr Henderson said homeowners no longer had the time to maintain a back yard or large house so living in an apartment was more practical. MORE: Why I live in Broadbeach Waters The average Australian home is now the smallest it’s been since 1996.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa14 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago“You will get plenty of people now that don’t want to mow their back yard anymore,” he said.“Someone else looks after all the common areas (of an apartment building).”While houses across the country are 8 per cent bigger than those built 20 years ago, a surge in the number of apartments being built has reduced the average size of dwellings.MORE: Buy now if you want to move in by Christmas According to the ABS data, the average apartment used to be 140sq m but was now closer to 125sq m.Further, about 27 per cent of new homes being built eight years ago were apartments whereas they now accounted for about 46 per cent.Gold Coast couple Michael and Vickie Ryan recently bought an apartment in The Rayjon Group’s 15-level Vantage development at Benowa, which they said was central and more convenient than a house.center_img The rise of apartments on the Gold Coast is contributing to the average Aussie home’s reduced size.THE rise of apartments on the Gold Coast is dragging down the average size of the Australian home.New data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics shows the average new home built in the past financial year was 186.3sq m, down 1.6 per cent from the previous year.It marked a 22-year low, making the average residence the smallest it has been since 1996.Craig James, chief economist at CommSec who commissioned the data, said the reduced size reflected the increase in apartments across the country, with more than half of new buildings in that category.“Generation Y, Millennials, couples and small families want to live closer to work, cafes, restaurants, shopping and airports, and are giving up living space for better proximity to the desirable amenities,” he said. Michael and Vickie Ryan have recently bought a property in the $200 million master planned Vantage community at Benowa.“We raised our family in the country before moving to the Coast,” Mrs Ryan said.“This location – close to shops, restaurants and all the services we need – offers the best of both worlds,” Mrs Ryan said.“We have plenty of room for family, so many friends nearby and everything we need is on our doorstep. There is no need to move.”Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:46Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:46 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenChoosing an apartment to invest in01:47last_img read more

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Russia banned from next Olympics and World Cup soccer

first_imgBy Brian Homewood, Gabrielle Tétrault-FarberLAUSANNE/MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russia was banned from the world’s top sporting events for four years on Monday, including the next summer and winter Olympics and the 2022 soccer World Cup, for tampering with doping tests.The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) executive committee acted after concluding that Moscow had planted fake evidence and deleted files linked to positive doping tests in laboratory data that could have helped identify drug cheats.The decision was a huge blow to the pride of a nation that has traditionally been a powerhouse in many sports but whose reputation has been tarnished by a series of doping scandals.“For too long, Russian doping has detracted from clean sport,” WADA President Craig Reedie said after a meeting of WADA’s executive committee in the Swiss city of Lausanne. He said in a statement Russia’s actions had demanded a robust response and added: “That is exactly what has been delivered today.”WADA confirmed the Russian national team could not take part in the 2022 World Cup soccer in Qatar under the Russian flag and could participate only as neutrals. It was not clear how competing as neutrals at the World Cup might work in practice. FIFA, soccer’s world governing body, said it was in contact with WADA to clarify the extent of the decision.The ban also means Russian sportsmen and sportswomen will not be able to perform at the Olympics in Tokyo next year under their own flag and national anthem.The International Olympic Committee (IOC), which has come under attack for not taking a harder line on Russian doping, said it fully backed the ruling by the Swiss-based WADA. The 2020 Tokyo Olympic organising committee said it would welcome all athletes as long as they were clean and work with other organisations to fully implement anti-doping measures, Tokyo 2020 spokesman Masa Takaya said.YEARS OF DOPING SCANDALS Russia has been embroiled in doping scandals since a 2015 report commissioned by WADA found evidence of mass doping in Russian athletics.Many of Russia’s athletes were sidelined from the past two Olympics and Russia was stripped of its flag altogether at last year’s Pyeongchang Winter Games as punishment for state-sponsored doping cover-ups at the 2014 Sochi Games.Monday’s sanctions, which also include a four-year ban on Russia hosting major sporting events, were recommended by WADA’s compliance review committee in response to the doctored laboratory data provided by Moscow this year. One of the conditions for the reinstatement of Russian anti-doping agency RUSADA, suspended in 2015 but reinstated last year, had been that Moscow provide an authentic copy of the laboratory data.The sanctions in effect strip the agency of its accreditation. The punishment leaves the door open for clean Russian athletes to compete at big international events without their flag or anthem for the next four years, something they did at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics.Some Russian officials have tried to cast WADA’s behaviour as part of what they say is a broader Western attempt to hold back Moscow. Igor Lebedev, a lawmaker and deputy speaker of Russia’s lower house of parliament, said the move was a serious blow to Russian sport that required a tough response from Russian authorities, the RIA news agency reported.If RUSADA appeals WADA’s punishment, the case will be referred to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.“DEVASTATING BLOW TO CLEAN ATHLETES”Some sport officials wanted tougher action. Travis Tygart, head of the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), said the failure to impose a complete ban was “yet another devastating blow to clean athletes.”Russian doping whistleblower Grigory Rodchenkov, the former head of Moscow’s suspended anti-doping laboratory, said that without the complete data from the Moscow laboratory there was no telling how many athletes were still competing doped. “Russia’s falsifications and cheating continued in 2019 even when Russia was under scrutiny,” Rodchenkov, now in hiding in the United States, said in a statement.Noting that many files had been deleted and results lost, he said: “Who can say whether there are any clean athletes in Russia if the crucial data is lost?”last_img read more

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J.R. Smith, Dion Waiters find an easy early fit with the Lakers in the NBA ‘Bubble’

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. >> There’s chemistry that players talk about, and there’s chemistry that they show.It seemed telling that J.R. Smith, a Laker for all of three weeks, found himself video-bombed during a Friday afternoon interview with media by a masked JaVale McGee.“That’s my boy right here,” Smith said, as McGee cackled alongside him.In his short time as a Laker, the 34-year-old has made a lot of headway to ingratiate himself to teammates. From colorful Instagram videos of reading menus during the quarantine, to a round of golf with Alex Caruso — Smith has seemed to several teammates like one of the most upbeat players in the NBA Restart. Both Smith and Waiters are well-connected NBA vets, so coming back to the bubble has been as much a reunion as a business trip. Smith listed off connections from his past, like childhood friends Kyle Lowry and Marvin Williams. Checking on old friends in person (albeit from a distance) has been something he values even more after grappling with feelings of depression when he was out of the league.But the bonds he will form with his current teammates could be the most important. And for Smith, it sure seems like he’s relishing the opportunity.“So many people don’t really take advantage of those friendships that you gain throughout the journey in life,” he said. “I’ve built some unbelievable friendships from basketball. For me it’s just easier to throw myself into my teammates and people I see every day, just because I want to show I’m invested in them, and I would hope they’re invested in me.” Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersThat seems to have everything to do with the opportunity he and Dion Waiters are getting to join a championship contender on the very, very back end of the season. Neither guard was playing much earlier this year — in the case of Smith, he hasn’t played an NBA minute since 2018. Simply being back in a practice environment, albeit a highly unusual one with many challenges given the restrictive nature of the Disney campus, has brought Smith a daily levity.“Being around a bunch of guys who love to win, love to have fun in a practice atmosphere. Being around the trainers and coaches … I know how to be me,” Smith said, “And I’m very comfortable. And it felt so good to get back to that.”The recent hits to the Lakers’ backcourt depth mean that Smith and Waiters aren’t just end-of-the-bench warmers: They’re likely to be real contributors, especially as Rajon Rondo begins a six-to-eight-week recovery process from thumb surgery. Both Smith and Waiters have experienced off-court drama in the last few seasons that have grabbed headlines and sometimes overshadowed their actual on-court contributions. But Vogel said in practice for the last week, their energy for basketball has sparked some intensity as the Lakers work their way back to competitive shape.“They both bring toughness and swag — those guys are killers,” Vogel said. “They go after it with great competitive spirit and they have the talent to back it up and be highly productive on the court. They’ve proven that throughout their careers.” Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed center_img How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions Smith’s background with LeBron James is arguably the factor that has helped him blend the most. His years in Cleveland were the winningest seasons of his career. But he’s also seen an evolution in James, who notably grated at times with teammates like Kyrie Irving, or coaches like David Blatt. And the change Smith sees could help the Lakers stay grounded during the restart.“I think he’s more relatable and easier to get along with,” Smith said. “Before he was always so focused on his drive and winning and stuff like that, but I feel like … that side of it is kind of off his shoulders, and he can just be him. He don’t have sit up and try and orchestrate the offense or the defense, or what somebody did wrong. He’ll let the coaches do their job, and I think that’s a true testament to him growing.”The odd connection between the most recently acquired Lakers is that they were both pieces in a critical trade during the 2014-15 season that sent Smith to Cleveland and Waiters off to Oklahoma City. But Waiters said Friday that’s not really on his mind — and Smith playfully cautioned a reporter who asked, “Stop trying to start (expletive).”Waiters would have gotten out onto the court earlier if not for the hiatus: He was just a game or two away from playing for the Lakers after being signed in March, he said. In the four months, he worked out, many of those hours in his garage gym. Waiters, who some teammates have taken to calling “Bubble Cheese” in compound nod to the Disney campus and Waiter’s “Philly Cheese” nickname, is the player mostly likely to receive minutes that would have otherwise gone to Rondo.“I’ve been there before, I’ve been in this position plenty of times,” he said. “I think I’m ready. Just continue to keep working, continue to get familiar with the sets and things like that. But at the end of the day it’s just still basketball. I’ve been doing that my whole life. So just being ready when my number’s called, just going out there and trying to impact the game.”Related Articleslast_img read more

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