Dave Matthews Band Welcomes Strings & More Horns For Tour-Closing Hollywood Bowl Show [Videos]

first_img[Video: iSayCheezAJ]After classics “Crash Into Me” and “What Would You Say”, Dave invited out the next special guests of the evening, a full string section, for “Here On Out”, with the strings sticking around for “Come On Come On”. For the next song, “Squirm”, Dave Matthews Band also invited out additional horns for the number, with the sound of the string section and added horn players creating a larger-than-life sound. The string section departed, and the additional horns stayed on for a run through “Jimi Thing”, “Sexy M.F.”, and “Shake Me Like A Monkey”.“What Would You Say”[Video: iSayCheezAJ]“Jimi Thing” > “Sexy M.F.” On Monday night, Dave Matthews Band capped off their ongoing summer tour with a sold-out performance at Los Angeles’ Hollywood Bowl. After standout shows at Lake Tahoe and Shoreline Amphitheater over the weekend, Dave Matthews and company pulled out all the stops for their final show of the tour, inviting a number of special guests—including a string section and an additional horn section—to join them across the evening.As has been tradition this past tour, Dave Matthews Band offered up a healthy mix of older classics, fan-favorite covers, and new tunes off the group’s recently released studio album, Come Tomorrow. Dave Matthews and special guest keyboardist Mark Batson (who also helped produce the new album) live debuted Come Tomorrow’s “When I’m Weary” early on in the performance, with Batson staying on stage and joining the full band for a take on “Louisiana Bayou” before leaving the group to perform an energized rendition of Peter Gabriel‘s “Sledgehammer”.“When I’m Weary” [Video: TJ Lauters]To close out the show, the various guests departed, leaving Dave Matthews Band to end their tour solo with renditions of “Everyday”, “She”, and “Ants Marching”. The group returned for encore with a rendition of “Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin)” before closing their summer tour in full with a cover of Bob Dylan‘s “All Along The Watchtower”.“Everyday”[Video: iSayCheezAJ]Setlist: Dave Matthews Band | Hollywood Bowl | Los Angeles, CA | 9/10/2018Set: One Sweet World, That Girl Is You, #41, Don’t Drink The Water, Again & Again, When I’m Weary (Dave & Mark Batson), Louisiana Bayou (w/ Mark Batson), Sledgehammer, Crash Into Me, What Would You Say, Here On Out (Dave w/ string section), Come On Come On (w/ string section), Squirm (w/ string section and additional horns), Jimi Thing (w/ additional horns) > Sexy M.F. (w/ additional horns), Shake Me Like A Monkey (w/ additional horns), Everyday, She, Ants MarchingEncore: Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin), Why I Am, All Along The Watchtowerlast_img read more

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Breakthrough Prize for Ruvkun

first_imgGary Ruvkun, Harvard Medical School professor of genetics at Massachusetts General Hospital, was named one of six winners of the 2015 Breakthrough Prizes in Life Sciences. Each winner, along with winners in physics and Mmathematics, will receive a $3 million prize.Ruvkun and Victor Ambros, University of Massachusetts Medical School, were each recognized for the discovery of a new world of genetic regulation by microRNAs, a class of tiny RNA molecules that inhibit translation or destabilize complementary mRNA targets. The other winners in the life sciences include C. David Allis, Alim Louis Benabid, Jennifer A. Doudna, and Emmanuelle Charpentier.The Breakthrough Prizes aim to celebrate scientists and generate excitement about the pursuit of science as a career. Breakthrough Prizes are funded by a grant from Sergey Brin and Anne Wojcicki’s  foundation, The Brin Wojcicki Foundation; a grant from Mark Zuckerberg’s fund at the Silicon Valley Community Foundation; a grant from Jack Ma Foundation; and a grant from Milner Foundation.The awards were presented at a gala co-hosted by founders Sergey Brin and Anne Wojcicki, Jack Ma and Cathy Zhang, Yuri and Julia Milner, Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan, and Vanity Fair editor Graydon Carter at NASA’s Ames Research Center.“This year’s life sciences laureates have made some spectacular discoveries, from a new kind of gene to a Parkinson’s treatment that has improved the lives of many,” Wojcicki said. “It’s energizing to be in the company of such brilliant and fertile minds.”“The world faces many fundamental challenges today, and there are many amazing scientists, researchers and engineers helping us solve them,” Zuckerberg said. “This year’s Breakthrough Prize winners have made discoveries that will help cure disease and move the world forward. They deserve to be recognized as heroes. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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‘Achilles’ heel’ of sickle cell disease?

first_imgResearchers from Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center have found that changes to a small stretch of DNA may circumvent the genetic defect behind sickle cell disease. The discovery, outlined today in the journal Nature, opens a promising path for developing gene-editing approaches to treat the disease and other hemoglobin disorders.This stretch of DNA, called an enhancer, controls a molecular switch that determines whether a red blood cell produces the adult form of hemoglobin — which in sickle cell disease is mutated — or a fetal form that is unaffected by and counteracts the effects of the mutation. Other studies have indicated that sickle-cell patients with elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin have a milder form of the disease.The new study was led by Stuart Orkin of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s, who is also David G. Nathan Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School (HMS); Daniel Bauer, also of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s and an assistant professor of pediatrics at HMS; and Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. The research was spurred by the discovery that naturally occurring beneficial variations in the DNA sequence in this enhancer dial down the molecular switch only in red blood cells.To mimic and improve upon the effects of these variations, the research team used recently developed gene-editing tools to cut out tiny sections of DNA step by step along the entire length of the enhancer in blood stem cells from human donors. The researchers allowed the cells to mature into red blood cells and found that the amount of fetal hemoglobin the cells produced had increased substantially.The team’s experiments revealed a specific location in the enhancer that, when cut, leads to production of high levels of fetal hemoglobin. Parallel experiments in an animal model revealed that removal of this part of the enhancer affected the molecular switch’s expression only in red blood cells, not in immune or brain cells, where the switch is also active. These findings show that the effects are restricted to red blood cells, and that other cell types are unaffected.“There was no efficient way of conducting this kind of experiment until now,” said Bauer, a pediatric hematologist/oncologist at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s. “Our goal was to break the enhancer, rather than fix the hemoglobin mutation, but to do so in very precise ways that are only possible since gene-editing technologies … became available.”Interest in exploring the potential clinical uses of the molecular switch, called BCL11A, has grown since Orkin’s laboratory revealed its direct role in the transition from fetal to adult hemoglobin in Nature in 2009. Another important step came in 2013, when the journal Science published their report of the discovery of the enhancer that directs expression of BCL11A only in red blood cells.“We’ve now targeted the modifier of the modifier of a disease-causing gene,” said Orkin, a leader of Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s who serves as chairman of pediatric oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and associate chief of hematology/oncology at Boston Children’s Hospital. “It’s a very different approach to treating disease.”The data provide proof of principle that targeted edits to BCL11A’s enhancer in blood stem cells could be an attractive approach for curing sickle cell disease and related conditions.“These experiments may have revealed the genetic Achilles’ heel of sickle cell disease,” said Orkin. “Alterations to these specific portions of the enhancer have the same effect as knocking the whole enhancer out altogether, suggesting that this could be a promising strategy to translate into the clinic.”“Although fixing the sickle mutation itself would seem the most straightforward approach, it turns out that blood stem cells, the ultimate targets for this kind of therapy, are much more resistant to genetic repair than to genetic disruption,” Bauer added. “Therefore, making a single DNA cut that breaks the enhancer solely in blood stem cells could be a much more feasible strategy.”Orkin and Bauer are also affiliated with Harvard Medical School and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute; Orkin is an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Other members of the research team include lead authors Matthew C. Canver, Elenoe C. Smith, Falak Sher, Luca Pinello, and Neville E. Sanjana, as well as co-authors Ophir Shalem, Diane D. Chen, Patrick G. Schupp, Divya S. Vinjamur, Sara P. Garcia, Sidinh Luc, Ryo Kirita, Yukio Nakamura, Yuko Fujiwara, Takahiro Maeda, and Guo-Cheng Yuan.last_img read more

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‘Superbug’ highlights dangers of antibiotic resistance

first_imgA “superbug” that is resistant to colistin — the antibiotic of last resort — was recently found in a U.S. patient with a urinary tract infection. Sarah Fortune, professor of immunology and infectious diseases at Harvard Chan School, discusses the danger posed by pan-resistant bacteria and how best to fight it.Just how big a problem is this new “superbug”?The media makes it sound catastrophic, but this particular case of antibiotic resistance — which was found in a woman who has now recovered — is probably not quite as new as some recent reports have suggested. The U.S. actually has seen some colistin-resistant organisms over the past ten years. However, this is the first appearance of what is called plasma-mediated colistin resistance — which means that a gene called mcr-1, which enables bacteria to be resistant to colistin, is carried on a piece of DNA called a plasmid that can be rapidly exchanged between organisms, so that other bacteria can become resistant.Although this particular case of antibiotic resistance may not be as acute as the media makes it sound, in general these increasingly high-level resistances are an enormous problem. We should be scared enough that we do something about it while we still have antibiotics that work. I think it is easy to take for granted having an arsenal of really effective antibiotics—we have about 100 or so right now. But bacteria are going to evolve resistances to them, and we must be mindful of that. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Understanding the Container Storage Interface Project

first_imgContainers have become intensely important to software developers and system administrators – for good reason. Containers can isolate application code and even entire application stacks. That helps Ops teams keep test and production environments separate. In turn, that enhances security efforts and it gives IT more control of their environments. So, yay.But containers are still an evolving technology – which sounds better than, “We’re still figuring it out as we go.” And, as with nearly all the hairy problems computer professionals ever contend with, the messy bits are in integration. There are a lot of moving pieces, and where they meet (or fail to), we encounter friction.As a result, even if your shop is committed to container technology, getting underway isn’t as easy as it seems.First, as with any technical strategy, a development team has to choose the container orchestration architecture that’s the best choice for its shop. Fortunately, there are several good choices, such as Kubernetes, Mesosphere, Cloud Foundry, and Docker. One development team might choose Cloud Foundry, another Mesosphere, and so on; each platform serves a set of use cases.But after choosing a container architecture, the process gets more complex. Soon, a developer finds their team lost in yak shaving. That’s immensely frustrating. We want to solve this problem – not to deal with downstream issues that are distractions from the job-at-hand. We don’t want to invest time in cleaning up an old mess or building an integration tool before we can even get started.And that’s where the Container Storage Interface project (CSI) comes in.But let’s take a step back, so you can understand the problem that CSI solves. I’ve devoted a lot of time and energy to this, so I’m rather passionate about it.Container orchestrators have difficulty running applications that require data to persist between invocations of the containers. When a virtual machine (VM) is stopped and restarted (on the same node or elsewhere) the data (which may be a file system, database, whatever) is preserved. That’s because that data is encapsulated inside the virtual machine.In contrast, a container only contains the applications and its associated software dependencies; it does not include the underlying file system. This limits the application types you can run inside of a container. At least, it limits the value of running a stateful application in a container because that single container could only run on a specific node. So, in order to take advantage of containers, developers have to investigate the storage options and, too often, create unique custom solutions.Vendor and open source storage providers all have some kind of API – and that’s the nub of the problem. Because each storage product’s API has different semantics, nuances, and interfaces, developers have to learn each one to take advantage of the software’s features. Multiply that by the number of container orchestrators, and you see the yaks lining up for their haircuts. Particularly if you need to change container orchestrators or storage providers.It’s tough for users, but the lack of standardization presents problems for vendors, too. Storage companies have to choose which container orchestrators to support (and notably, which ones not to support); or they have to duplicate effort to support all of them. It’s very much like the problems an independent software vendor (ISV) faces when a new operating system comes along: Will it take off? Should we invest the time in it?Remember what it was like when mobile application developers needed to write every line of code for each possible mobile device? Yeah, like that. Nobody knows what works with what, and which version has bugs when you try to integrate this particular Tab A into that particular Slot B. The only way to figure things out is by trial and error. Few development teams (or project managers) want to be told, “Embrace unpredictability,” so they glom onto one “solution” and are demotivated to change the architecture because they’re afraid of the downstream side-effects.This slows down the adoption of containers, software-defined storage, and more modern infrastructures. Instead, the uncertainties cause people to continue to deploy older, legacy infrastructure. Fragmentation in this market has severely limited its ability to be embraced.It isn’t as though this is a new problem; this cycle has repeated time and again. Earlier technology evolutions certainly have had to deal with the process of creating reliable standards. For example, we struggled with choosing a database and then jiggling application data to integrate with another department’s software. By now, we should know the importance of building towards integration. A rising tide after all raises all boats.We are still doing storage like it’s 1999. It’s time to create a container storage interface that works across the industry. Thus now, is the point when your voice matters most.The Container Storage Interface (CSI) is a universal storage interface – effectively an API specification– that aims to enable easy interoperability between container orchestrators and storage providers. The result is application portability across infrastructures. CSI will enable container orchestrators to leverage any storage provider (cloud or otherwise) to consume storage services; storage providers can provide storage services to any container orchestrator.That sounds marketing-buzzwordy, doesn’t it? The point isn’t simply to create a single way for developers to incorporate storage into container-based software. That’d be only a matter of jargon and vocabulary (“You say tomato, I say to-MAH-to”). But a real interface takes into account what each platform can and cannot do. For example, one platform might let you mount more than one volume, and any API has to support that capability while also preventing its use on the other platforms. If we were talking about cars, the analogy might be an API responding, “This car model doesn’t have a back seat, so you can’t do this action.”Three communities have a stake in creating a Container Storage Interface: container orchestrators, storage providers, and the end-user community. “Users” encompasses several groups, each with its own sensitivities, including operations teams, technology architects, and storage specialists. Right now, the CSI project wants input from all of them.We have a pretty good spec, I think. We’ve collaborated with a number of people, and have contributed over two years of our experience from REX-Ray. But does it address concerns that people really have? Is there a feature or capability that needs to be included? We need as many voices in the community as possible to help us streamline this interface and make it work. The beauty of working with a community is hearing thoughts and ideas from all facets of a problem. So please, join us, lend us your voice and your thoughts.How You Can Get Involved:GitHub Spec: Read the spec, comment, ask questions, provide feedback.Google Group: Container Storage Interface CommunityThis is a public Google+ group for all CSI contributors. All the public meetings and discussions are shared here. Visit this group page for news and updates on CSI activities.Attend Community Sync Meetings: Meetings are held on Zoom every two weeks from 9am to 10am PT. Next meeting is October 4, 2017. Location: https://zoom.us/j/790748945. Check the Google doc the day of the meeting to confirm the meeting time.Google Group: Container Storage Interface Working GroupA smaller Google+ group of maintainers/approvers of CSI who maintain impartiality and have the benefit of end users in mind. Visit this page to stay up to date on the project.last_img read more

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Duncan Hall hosts golf tournament

first_imgAfter weeks of preparation, Duncan Hall will host its first campus-wide golf tournament, The Duncan Classic, the weekend of April 13th and 14th. The nine-hole competition will include separate chipping and putting challenges. Sophomore Michael O’Brien, a Duncan Hall resident, said he saw the potential for an individual golf tournament for the Notre Dame community when coming up with a plan. “Josh Whelan started a new tradition in Duncan Hall, the Duncan blazer, and I loved the idea,” he said. “Duncan was in need of a new dorm event, and I was inspired by Josh’s idea and our location by the Notre Dame Golf Course.” O’Brien said he decided to combine the two ideas and the Duncan Classic was born. “This tournament is a way to spread the Duncan tradition with those who participate in and win the Duncan Classic,” he said.   The tournament will include separate men’s and women’s brackets, O’Brien said. Any students and faculty from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross may participate, but to keep the competition fair and to encourage more participation by amateur golfers, Division I golfers may not compete. The dorm also hopes to make the event more accessible by providing participants with necessary equipment. “Duncan Hall will provide all participants with a set of clubs, if needed, free of charge,” he said.   Those who participate will play on Saturday, and those who make the cut will compete in the next round on Championship Sunday where they will play in pairs instead of as a group of four. “You can sign up with your friends, but you are not guaranteed your Saturday foursome until all have officially registered on the Google form,” he said. The costs for participating will vary according to the event of choice. O’Brien said $10 will cover the cost of the nine-hole game. Competing in either the putting or chipping challenge will cost three dollars, and participating in both will cost a total of five dollars. Individuals who would like to do all three events can participate at a fee of $15. The preliminary men’s round will start from the white tees, while the women will start from the red tees, he said. On Championship Sunday, the men who advance will begin at the blue tees. All United States Golf Association (USGA) rules will apply throughout the competition, O’Brien said. “Tee times are available from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. all day Saturday, and you can see which tee times are available on an embedded link on the Google doc,” O’Brien said. “The best way to find the document and register is to search ‘Duncan Classic’ on Facebook, but you can also check the Week at ND email for the link.” O’Brien said the scoring system in place is individual stroke play, meaning the total number of shots taken on each hole will compose the final score. “Golf is a gentleman’s sport so we trust participants to record their scores individually and accurately,” he said. “However, there will be a large Duncan staff presence on the course. Any cheating will not be tolerated.” The competition will conclude with a green jacket ceremony, supplemented with refreshments in the Duncan courtyard. First, second and third place finishers for both the men’s and women’s teams will receive a gift card, O’Brien said. Awards will also be given to the top finishers in the putting, chipping, longest drive and closest pin challenges, O’Brien said. The man and woman who win the nine-hole tournament will each receive a blazer with the Duncan crest. “In future years it [the blazer] will have the Duncan Classic crest on it,” O’Brien said. Duncan will also award a plaque at the conclusion of the Classic which will go to each male and female winner’s dorm, department or college where it can be displayed until the start of the next Duncan Classic. “In a way, the plaque will immortalize the winner and their respective dorm, department, or college,” he said.   In the future, commissioners of the Duncan Classic hope to make the competition an annual event held on the first football bye weekend of the fall semester, beginning next fall, he said. “We want this tournament to be the Bookstore Basketball of golf,” O’Brien said. “The goal for this year was to get the tournament up and running, but in future years we hope to partner with the Bald and the Beautiful or another charity.” Contact Carolyn Hutyra at [email protected]last_img read more

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Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, and your credit union

first_imgIf you just heard somebody from Sesame Street say, “Which one of these is not like the other?” we understand. On the surface, credit union marketing doesn’t have much to do with these guitar legends but, day-to-day, it does.The link is a great story about Eric Clapton. It’s been said (Snopes does not have an opinion) that the first time Eric Clapton heard Jimi Hendrix play guitar, he sighed, “I should just burn my guitar.”The story sounds just like something I hear often when talking with credit union executives. As many credit unions wrap up their year-end reports and start comparing notes, many wonder “Is it worth it?” Isn’t that the financial equivalent to Clapton’s thoughts about blowing up his career for fear of being inferior to a fellow musician?More concretely, this past week, we spent a day in a staff training session with a credit union that ended 2014 with some negative numbers. Combine a less than positive year, mounting pressure from the NCUA, and a few operational issues, it’s tempting to strike a match.Henry Ford knew business. He said, “Whether you think you can, or you can’t… you’re right.” I share his wisdom with my staff whenever a seemingly insurmountable obstacle is placed in front of us. When we looked at the monthly loan goal for the credit union, the huge number seemed undoable. When we broke it down into how many loans needed to be written on a daily basis, suddenly it sounded like a target that could be hit with no excuses! continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Google Flights will no longer charge for external booking links

first_imgMost of Google’s changes, such as allowing the airline, online travel agency, and free meta searches to sometimes be more on the page than Google Flights, have not yet been implemented. Therefore, it remains to be seen the extent of the impact of the changes on the flight optimization methods of passenger brands related to flights. Google Flights Sponsored Links Google Flights within Google travel pages Sponsored links in Google search “From the beginning of the month, we will no longer charge partners for Google Flight referralsSaid a Google spokesman. “Results within Google Flights will continue to rank according to user relevance, based on factors such as cost and convenience.” Although the breadth of the changes has yet to be seen, Google’s modified display algorithm could potentially be an important change for online passenger flight services that have felt the changes in Google’s releasing free results virtually out of the user’s sight. Google’s Flights feature is changing the way it makes money, and this could have significant consequences for travelers, online travel agencies and airlines. Shift. Nothing seems to change among the sponsored links from Expedition, CheapOair, CheapTickets, and Kayak that are highlighted at the top of the Google search results page when someone, for example, searches for “flights to Chicago.” However, the query “flights to Chicago” in the Google search engine is triggered by the Google Flights module, which is always the first result above all organic results, and just below the ads sponsored by Google AdWords. As of this month, Google will no longer charge airlines for booking links on their websites within the price comparison feature. Google Flights module in search engine Google Flight Module in Google Search Changes to airline compensation also affect Google Flights, such as service comparison features or meta searches on Google.com/flight. Passengers who clicked on the link within the Google Flights module, and within the Google search engine, were redirected to Google Flights within Google’s own travel pages. Google Flights For example, when a series of modifications are applied in the middle of next month, consumers searching for United Airlines on Google could see a free link to United.com or Kayak.com that is placed more on a page or screen than Google’s own flight search results module. Today, that never happens; Google puts its flight module above all organic results. The links that are visible under “Best Departures” or lower on the page were previously marked as “Advertisement”, but from now on they will be free for airlines, so this mark will disappear. Source / photo: Skift; Googlelast_img read more

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EMI rewards IMCA RaceSaver track, series champs

first_imgLINCOLN, Neb. – IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Car drivers winning track or series championships in 2017 can look forward to awards from EMI.The Lincoln, Neb., chassis manufacturer and high performance parts retailer gives $100 gift cards to track and series champions in IMCA’s fastest growing division.Those gift cards will be presented during the national IMCA awards banquet or mailed beginning the following week from the home office.Also in line for $100 gift cards are each of the 27 main event starters at the upcoming IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Nationals, to be held Sept. 1-3 at Eagle Raceway.“We couldn’t be more proud of the growth in the IMCA RaceSaver division,” stated Mike Long, Director of Operations at EMI. “To be part of the series at its inception and contribute to this growth gives us all a sense of pride and accomplishment.”Information about EMI chassis and parts is available at the www.eaglemotorsports.com website, by calling 402 438-0392 and on Facebook“We’ve inked a new three-year partnership agreement with EMI for our RaceSaver Sprint Car division and couldn’t be more proud to renew a relationship that began with the revival of the IMCA Sprint Car division in 2013,” said Kevin Yoder, marketing director for IMCA. “EMI has been a great asset for Sprint Car racers and will continue to be for years to come.”last_img read more

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Russia banned from next Olympics and World Cup soccer

first_imgBy Brian Homewood, Gabrielle Tétrault-FarberLAUSANNE/MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russia was banned from the world’s top sporting events for four years on Monday, including the next summer and winter Olympics and the 2022 soccer World Cup, for tampering with doping tests.The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) executive committee acted after concluding that Moscow had planted fake evidence and deleted files linked to positive doping tests in laboratory data that could have helped identify drug cheats.The decision was a huge blow to the pride of a nation that has traditionally been a powerhouse in many sports but whose reputation has been tarnished by a series of doping scandals.“For too long, Russian doping has detracted from clean sport,” WADA President Craig Reedie said after a meeting of WADA’s executive committee in the Swiss city of Lausanne. He said in a statement Russia’s actions had demanded a robust response and added: “That is exactly what has been delivered today.”WADA confirmed the Russian national team could not take part in the 2022 World Cup soccer in Qatar under the Russian flag and could participate only as neutrals. It was not clear how competing as neutrals at the World Cup might work in practice. FIFA, soccer’s world governing body, said it was in contact with WADA to clarify the extent of the decision.The ban also means Russian sportsmen and sportswomen will not be able to perform at the Olympics in Tokyo next year under their own flag and national anthem.The International Olympic Committee (IOC), which has come under attack for not taking a harder line on Russian doping, said it fully backed the ruling by the Swiss-based WADA. The 2020 Tokyo Olympic organising committee said it would welcome all athletes as long as they were clean and work with other organisations to fully implement anti-doping measures, Tokyo 2020 spokesman Masa Takaya said.YEARS OF DOPING SCANDALS Russia has been embroiled in doping scandals since a 2015 report commissioned by WADA found evidence of mass doping in Russian athletics.Many of Russia’s athletes were sidelined from the past two Olympics and Russia was stripped of its flag altogether at last year’s Pyeongchang Winter Games as punishment for state-sponsored doping cover-ups at the 2014 Sochi Games.Monday’s sanctions, which also include a four-year ban on Russia hosting major sporting events, were recommended by WADA’s compliance review committee in response to the doctored laboratory data provided by Moscow this year. One of the conditions for the reinstatement of Russian anti-doping agency RUSADA, suspended in 2015 but reinstated last year, had been that Moscow provide an authentic copy of the laboratory data.The sanctions in effect strip the agency of its accreditation. The punishment leaves the door open for clean Russian athletes to compete at big international events without their flag or anthem for the next four years, something they did at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics.Some Russian officials have tried to cast WADA’s behaviour as part of what they say is a broader Western attempt to hold back Moscow. Igor Lebedev, a lawmaker and deputy speaker of Russia’s lower house of parliament, said the move was a serious blow to Russian sport that required a tough response from Russian authorities, the RIA news agency reported.If RUSADA appeals WADA’s punishment, the case will be referred to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.“DEVASTATING BLOW TO CLEAN ATHLETES”Some sport officials wanted tougher action. Travis Tygart, head of the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), said the failure to impose a complete ban was “yet another devastating blow to clean athletes.”Russian doping whistleblower Grigory Rodchenkov, the former head of Moscow’s suspended anti-doping laboratory, said that without the complete data from the Moscow laboratory there was no telling how many athletes were still competing doped. “Russia’s falsifications and cheating continued in 2019 even when Russia was under scrutiny,” Rodchenkov, now in hiding in the United States, said in a statement.Noting that many files had been deleted and results lost, he said: “Who can say whether there are any clean athletes in Russia if the crucial data is lost?”last_img read more

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