Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band Work Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love” Inside “St. Stephen” In Philly [Watch]

first_imgOn Sunday, following a busy week of New York shows, Phil Lesh capped his east coast run with The Terrapin Family Band at Philadelphia, PA’s The Fillmore. Billed as “Unbroken Train” the evening included performances by Twiddle and Midnight North in addition to Phil and the Terrapin Family Band.Phil and company once again drew from the Grateful Dead repertoire and beyond for their Philadelphia performance. The highlight of the evening, however, came during the middle of the set, when the band started in on “St. Stephen”. After getting through the body of the composition and into improvisational territory, the band steered into a cover of Led Zeppelin classic “Whole Lotta Love” with Alex Koford (who spent most of this run on drums but moved to guitar for the Philadelphia show) on vocals. From there, the band flirted with the Allman Brothers Band‘s “Mountain Jam” before returning to the “St. Stephen” theme to finish out the segment.You can watch fan-shot footage from Sunday’s Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band set below, including a full video of the “St. Stephen”/”Whole Lotta Love” sandwich:Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band – ” St. Stephen” > “Whole Lotta Love” [Led Zeppelin cover, crowd-shot][Video: super vince]Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band – “Stella Blue”[Video: super vince]Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band – “Werewolves of London” [Warren Zevon cover][Video: super vince]Setlist: Phil Lesh & The Terrapin Family Band | The Fillmore Philadelphia | Philadelphia, PA | 9/9/18 Set: Rumble, Mason’s Children, China Cat Sunflower, Mr. Charlie, Tennessee Jed, Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodeloo, The Music Never Stopped, St. Stephen > Whole Lotta Love > St. Stephen, Stella Blue, Help On The Way > River Song > Slipknot! > Franklin’s TowerEncore: Werewolves of Londonlast_img read more

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Dave Matthews Band Welcomes Strings & More Horns For Tour-Closing Hollywood Bowl Show [Videos]

first_img[Video: iSayCheezAJ]After classics “Crash Into Me” and “What Would You Say”, Dave invited out the next special guests of the evening, a full string section, for “Here On Out”, with the strings sticking around for “Come On Come On”. For the next song, “Squirm”, Dave Matthews Band also invited out additional horns for the number, with the sound of the string section and added horn players creating a larger-than-life sound. The string section departed, and the additional horns stayed on for a run through “Jimi Thing”, “Sexy M.F.”, and “Shake Me Like A Monkey”.“What Would You Say”[Video: iSayCheezAJ]“Jimi Thing” > “Sexy M.F.” On Monday night, Dave Matthews Band capped off their ongoing summer tour with a sold-out performance at Los Angeles’ Hollywood Bowl. After standout shows at Lake Tahoe and Shoreline Amphitheater over the weekend, Dave Matthews and company pulled out all the stops for their final show of the tour, inviting a number of special guests—including a string section and an additional horn section—to join them across the evening.As has been tradition this past tour, Dave Matthews Band offered up a healthy mix of older classics, fan-favorite covers, and new tunes off the group’s recently released studio album, Come Tomorrow. Dave Matthews and special guest keyboardist Mark Batson (who also helped produce the new album) live debuted Come Tomorrow’s “When I’m Weary” early on in the performance, with Batson staying on stage and joining the full band for a take on “Louisiana Bayou” before leaving the group to perform an energized rendition of Peter Gabriel‘s “Sledgehammer”.“When I’m Weary” [Video: TJ Lauters]To close out the show, the various guests departed, leaving Dave Matthews Band to end their tour solo with renditions of “Everyday”, “She”, and “Ants Marching”. The group returned for encore with a rendition of “Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin)” before closing their summer tour in full with a cover of Bob Dylan‘s “All Along The Watchtower”.“Everyday”[Video: iSayCheezAJ]Setlist: Dave Matthews Band | Hollywood Bowl | Los Angeles, CA | 9/10/2018Set: One Sweet World, That Girl Is You, #41, Don’t Drink The Water, Again & Again, When I’m Weary (Dave & Mark Batson), Louisiana Bayou (w/ Mark Batson), Sledgehammer, Crash Into Me, What Would You Say, Here On Out (Dave w/ string section), Come On Come On (w/ string section), Squirm (w/ string section and additional horns), Jimi Thing (w/ additional horns) > Sexy M.F. (w/ additional horns), Shake Me Like A Monkey (w/ additional horns), Everyday, She, Ants MarchingEncore: Samurai Cop (Oh Joy Begin), Why I Am, All Along The Watchtowerlast_img read more

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Tedeschi Trucks Band & Steve Earle Showcase Powerfully Contrasting Views Of The Blues At The Beacon [Photos/Videos]

first_imgFollowing a break, Derek Trucks, Susan Tedeschi, and company took the stage and continued Earle’s bluesy list with a set-opening cover of “Statesboro Blues”, a nod to the many renditions of the song played by the Allman Brothers Band during their own storied Beacon residencies. The first “Simple Things” since February came next, followed by the first 2018 rendition of “Learn How To Love”, the Revelator track penned by Derek and Susan with help from Lettuce’s Eric Krasno, Adam Deitch, and Adam Smirnoff.A cover of The Lovin’ Spoonful‘s “Darlin’ Be Home Soon” got the call next before Mike Mattison stepped to center stage for a rousing reading of Allen Toussaint‘s “Get Out Of My Life, Woman”. The show’s blues-heavy aesthetic continued as Tedeschi Trucks rattled off renditions of “Shelter”, Ruth Brown‘s “Mama He Treats Your Daughter Mean”, and “All That I Need”, the latter of which featured some entrancing flute work by Kofi Burbridge and a towering, cathartic release.Blues standard “The Sky Is Crying” came next, Susan Tedeschi laying into a searing solo as Derek fought through some onstage technical issues. Tedeschi shined on vocals once again on Made Up Mind track “Part of Me”, written along with Doyle Bramhall II, who joined the band onstage on the first night of their Beacon stint.Little Milton‘s “More & More” followed before the highlight jam of the night, “Bound For Glory”, took the band out into the ether and back again for an impressive finish. TTB’s fan-favorite pairing of newly minted Rock & Roll Hall of Fame nominee John Prine‘s “Angel From Montgomery” and the Grateful Dead‘s “Sugaree” guided the show into its home stretch before Let Me Get By staple “I Want More” rounded out the set, complete with a mid-song onstage string change by Trucks. Load remaining images Photo: Kevin Cole Photo: Kevin Cole On Tuesday night, October 9th, Tedeschi Trucks Band returned to their favorite haunt, New York’s Beacon Theatre, to commence the midweek portion of their six-night 2018 Big Apple residency. The performance, which featured an opening solo set by multiple Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Steve Earle, marked TTB’s 30th overall show at the Beacon.In a powerful contrast from Tedeschi Trucks Band’s full-bodied 12-piece sound, Steve Earle began the evening simply, with just his acoustic instrumnets and the charismatic grit of his legendary singing voice. Amid selections from his decades-long catalog, Earle bantered affably with the crowd, joking that his set “seems to be listing irresistibly toward the blues…Might as well surrender…”After performing “South Nashville Blues”, the 24-years-sober Earle explained the drawbacks of playing that particular tune (it overly romanticizes his drug and crime days) and offered the antidote to that dilemma with his next song, the much darker “CCKMP (Cocaine Cannot Kill My Pain)”. He also picked up his beloved mandolin (“This is my favorite thing in the world”) for set-closing runs through “Tell Moses”, which he co-wrote with Shawn Colvin, and hit single “Copperhead Road”.As he left the stage, Earle thanked the Beacon and offered a whole-hearted endorsement of the set to come: “Get ready for the best band in America, Tedeschi Trucks!” Photo: Kevin Cole For their encore, Derek and Susan re-emerged with the full band in tow for a pair of covers including George Harrison‘s “Isn’t It A Pity” and a rousing sing-along rendition of The Coasters‘ “Let’s Go Get Stoned”, which saw each of the vocalists onstage take lead for a verse. Susan commanded the final number with rockstar swagger, ad-libbing about the joys of having a drink or a smoke now and again and waxing hopeful about a future where weed is legal in all 50 states.With that, Tedeschi Trucks Band’s 2018 Beacon Theatre residency reached its midway point (and, for those keeping score, they haven’t yet repeated a song). The party continues tonight with help from JJ Grey.Below, you can watch a selection of videos from Tuesday’s performance and check out a gallery of photos courtesy of photographer Kevin Cole:Tedeschi Trucks Band – “Statesboro Blues” [Blind Willie McTell cover][Video: Sean Roche]Tedeschi Trucks Band – “Simple Things”[Video: Sean Roche]Tedeschi Trucks Band – “Get Out Of My Life, Woman” [Allen Toussaint cover][Video: Sean Roche]Tedeschi Trucks Band – “Angel From Montgomery”/”Sugaree” [John Prine/Grateful Dead cover][Video: Borrowed Tune]Tedeschi Trucks Band – “Isn’t It A Pity” [George Harrison cover][Video: themeboudin]Setlist: Tedeschi Trucks Band | The Beacon Theatre | New York, NY | 10/9/18Set: Statesboro Blues, Simple Things, Learn How To Love, Darlin’ Be Home Soon, Get Out Of My Life, Woman, Shelter, Mama He Treats Your Daughter Mean, All That I Need, The Sky Is Crying, Part Of Me, More & More, Angel From Montgomery/Sugaree, I Want MoreEncore: Isn’t It A Pity, Let’s Go Get StonedTedeschi Trucks Band w/ Steve Earle | The Beacon Theatre | New York, NY | 10/9/18 | Photos: Kevin Colelast_img read more

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The Revivalists Release Highly-Anticipated New Album, ‘Take Good Care’ [Listen]

first_imgToday, The Revivalists have released their brand new album, Take Good Care, via Loma Vista Recordings. The follow-up to 2015’s Men Amongst Mountains, the 14-track studio record features a fan-pleasing mix of recent live staples, “Got Love” and “You And I”, as well as “All My Friends“—which has already hit “#1 at Triple A Radio” and “Top 10 and climbing at Alternative Radio”—and an exciting variety of new tunes worth digging into and spending your own time with.The New Orleans-based octet is known for their contagious live energy, but it’s their craft of honest songwriting that sets them apart from the rest of the live music circuit. This album is a collective effort from all eight creators, plus Dave Cobb (Sturgill Simpson, Chris Stapleton), Andrew Dawson (Kanye West, Fun., Sleigh Bells), and Dave Bassett (Elle King, Vance Joy). Recorded between New Orleans and Nashville’s iconic RCA Studio B, The Revivalists’ 2018 Take Good Care definitely showcases the evolution of their journey since the band began in 2007, and their movement toward becoming a household name. With a sense of togetherness serving as the center point to the band’s everlasting curiosity, the new album explodes with sonic complexity, celebration, and catharsis.Without further ado, listen to The Revivalists’ Take Good Care below. For a list of upcoming dates, limited edition vinyl orders, and ticketing links–including The Revivalists’ 12/31 show at Mardi Gras World with Tank and the Bangas, head to the band’s website here.The Revivalists – ‘Take Good Care’last_img read more

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St. Fatty’s Daze 2019 To Feature Turkuaz, Andy Frasco, Octave Cat, Rumpke Mountain Boys, & More

first_imgColumbus, OH’s Woodlands Tavern has announced the return of their St. Fatty’s Daze mini-festival, set to take place on March 15th, 16th, and 17th, 2019.Leading the multi-band bill is NYC-based funk powerhouse Turkuaz, who will play two nights at the event. Octave Cat (the electronic-oriented trio featuring members of Dopapod and Lotus) and Rumpke Mountain Boys will also each play two sets at the weekend-long celebration. In addition, the lineup includes Andy Frasco, Mom & Dad, HYRYDER, Funk You, TATTAT, Barefuzz, Jahman Brahman, Wild Adriatic, Electic Orange Peel (two sets), Conscious Pilot (two sets), Subterranean, On The Sun, Devil’s Lettuce, Jesse Henry & The High Defs, Aaron Kamm & The One Drops, and more.Tickets for the event will be sold as single-night passes or as a combined three-night pass at a discounted rate. For more information or to grab your St. Faty’s Daze tickets now, head here.last_img read more

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Perfect landing

first_imgNew research is casting doubt on the old adage, “All you need to run is a pair of shoes.”Scientists have found that people who run barefoot, or in minimal footwear, tend to avoid “heel-striking,” and instead land on the ball of the foot or the middle of the foot. In so doing, these runners use the architecture of the foot and leg and some clever Newtonian physics to avoid hurtful and potentially damaging impacts, equivalent to two to three times body weight, that shod heel-strikers repeatedly experience.“People who don’t wear shoes when they run have an astonishingly different strike,”said Daniel E. Lieberman, professor of human evolutionary biology at Harvard University and co-author of a paper appearing this week in the journal Nature. “By landing on the middle or front of the foot, barefoot runners have almost no impact collision, much less than most shod runners generate when they heel-strike.“Most people today think barefoot running is dangerous and hurts, but actually you can run barefoot on the world’s hardest surfaces without the slightest discomfort and pain. All you need is a few calluses to avoid roughing up the skin of the foot. Further, it might be less injurious than the way some people run in shoes.”Working with populations of runners in the United States and Kenya, Lieberman and his colleagues at Harvard, the University of Glasgow, and Moi University in Kenya looked at the running gaits of three groups: those who had always run barefoot, those who had always worn shoes, and those who had converted to barefoot running from shod running. The researchers found a striking pattern.Most shod runners — more than 75 percent of Americans — heel-strike, experiencing a very large and sudden collision force about 1,000 times per mile run. People who run barefoot, however, tend to land with a springy step toward the middle or front of the foot.“Heel-striking is painful when barefoot or in minimal shoes because it causes a large collisional force each time a foot lands on the ground,” said co-author Madhusudhan Venkadesan, a postdoctoral researcher in applied mathematics and human evolutionary biology at Harvard. “Barefoot runners point their toes more at landing, avoiding this collision by decreasing the effective mass of the foot that comes to a sudden stop when you land, and by having a more compliant, or springy, leg.”The differences between shod and unshod running have evolutionary underpinnings. For example, said Lieberman, our early australopith ancestors had less-developed arches in their feet. Homo sapiens, by contrast, has evolved a strong, large arch that we use as a spring when running.“Our feet were made in part for running,” Lieberman said. But as he and his co-authors write in Nature: “Humans have engaged in endurance running for millions of years, but the modern running shoe was not invented until the 1970s. For most of human evolutionary history, runners were either barefoot or wore minimal footwear such as sandals or moccasins with smaller heels and little cushioning.”For modern humans who have grown up wearing shoes, barefoot or minimal shoe running is something to be eased into, warned Lieberman. Modern running shoes are designed to make heel-striking easy and comfortable. The padded heel cushions the force of the impact, making heel-striking less punishing.“Running barefoot or in minimal shoes is fun but uses different muscles,” said Lieberman. “If you’ve been a heel-striker all your life, you have to transition slowly to build strength in your calf and foot muscles.”In the future, he hopes, the kind of work done in this paper can not only investigate barefoot running but can provide insight into how to better prevent the repetitive-stress injuries that afflict a high percentage of runners today.“Our hope is that an evolutionary medicine approach to running and sports injury can help people run better for longer and feel better while they do it,” said Lieberman, who has created a Web site, to educate runners about the respective merits of shod and barefoot running.The Nature paper arose out of the senior honors theses of two Harvard undergraduates, William Werbel ’08 and Adam Daoud ‘09, both of whom went to Africa with Lieberman to help collect data for this study.Lieberman’s co-authors on the Nature paper are Venkadesan and Daoud at Harvard; Werbel, now at the University of Michigan; Susan D’Andrea of the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Providence; Irene S. Davis of the University of Delaware; and Robert Ojiambo Mang’Eni and Yannis Pitsiladis of Moi University in Kenya and the University of Glasgow in Scotland.The research was funded by the American School of Prehistoric Research, the Goelet Fund, Harvard University, and Vibram USA.last_img read more

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Karen Putnam named Radcliffe’s associate dean for advancement

first_imgKaren Putnam has been appointed associate dean for advancement at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Putnam’s position became effective on Sept. 15.Putnam has had a distinguished career in fundraising, beginning with service in Harvard’s Development Office, where her primary responsibility was the Fogg Art Museum. She went on to hold fundraising positions at Bryn Mawr College, the University of Pennsylvania, Yale University, and the Brooklyn Museum, where she was director of development.In 1993, Putnam became vice president for development, marketing, and public relations of the Central Park Conservancy and, in 1995, became president and CEO of the conservancy. Most recently, she worked at the Bessemer Trust in New York City, advising clients about philanthropy and wealth management. Putnam holds an undergraduate degree from Wellesley College and a doctorate in American Studies from Yale University.“I’m delighted that Karen Putnam has joined our leadership team and look forward to working with her,” said Radcliffe Institute Dean Barbara J. Grosz. “She brings a stellar background in academic fundraising and arts and civic organizations that will serve the Radcliffe Institute well.”last_img read more

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International conferences at the Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies

first_imgThe Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies welcomes four international conferences during the first decade of October, 2010.The first conference (Oct. 2-3) is dedicated to the ancient South Asian Fire ritual (Homa) and its variations – from Vedic to Hindu and Buddhist.  It will begin with a special performance of the Newari Homa in front of the Science Center on Saturday, Oct. 2, from 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.It is followed by the 14th Harvard Round Table on the Ethnogenesis of South and Central Asia (Oct. 4-5). This year’s main topics are: South Asian linguistics, genetics, archaeology and texts.The third conference, the Radcliffe Exploratory seminar on Comparative mythology, starts on Oct. 6. It focuses on theoretical issues of comparative mythology and its relations to genetics, paleontology, archaeology, and linguistics. Special attention is given to the deep reconstruction of ancient myths.Exploration of comparative mythology continues on Oct. 8, immediately after the Radcliffe seminar, with the Forth Annual Conference of the International Association for Comparative Mythology (IACM). This year, the conference begins with examining the core notions and terms of comparative mythology. It is followed by sessions on Indo-European mythology, myth and politics, the hero and his poets, and further reflexes on ancient mythology.Attendance of the Radcliffe seminar is by invitation only, but the rest of the conferences are open to the public. The IACM conference has an entrance fee of $50.For more information, please consult the Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies website.last_img read more

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A costly divide in education

first_imgOn Wednesday, as part of the John Harvard Book Celebration, Harvard Graduate School of Education Dean Kathleen McCartney spoke about the most effective ways to close the achievement gap between low-income students and their middle and higher-income peers.In her hour-long presentation at the Cambridge Public Library,  “Addressing the Challenges Facing Public Education,” McCartney outlined the full extent of the achievement gap in terms of educational and life outcomes, including obstacles to effectively closing it. She concluded by detailing reforms she believes would improve the status quo. McCartney illustrated her arguments with research from the social sciences.McCartney started by describing the scope of the problem. In large school districts across the nation, she said, about half of low-income high school students fail to graduate with their class. The United States is falling behind other nations in both math (the U.S. is ranked 25th) and science (17th).McCartney broadened the achievement gap debate well beyond issues of social justice, asserting that our educational failures also come at a high economic cost. Underperforming students, she said, face “lower earnings, poorer health, and higher rates of incarceration,” which we all pay for directly or indirectly.McCartney rejected the claims of those who say the achievement gap is impossible to remedy. “I don’t agree,” she said, “because I see examples of success every day.” She then defined “areas where I would invest funds” to optimize educational and life outcomes. First, she said, “teachers matter a lot” in student achievement (or lack thereof). “We need to get better people to enter the field and we need to support them better.” McCartney lamented that “half of [new] teachers drop out after four years.” She also called for more initiatives to develop leaders in education, describing the development of good leaders as “the single most promising strategy for transforming education.”McCartney also recommended a longer school day and year. She presented data that connected extending classroom time to better educational outcomes. “We have a short school year now,” McCartney said, “because we used to be an agrarian society where students were needed to farm.” We need to keep students in school longer, McCartney argued, to enable “a broader and deeper coverage of the curriculum,” and “to deepen adult-child relationships” within schools.Most of all, McCartney emphasized the cost-effectiveness of early childhood intervention. “For every dollar we invest in early intervention,” she said, “we get a return of four dollars,” far more bang for the buck than other forms of remedial intervention. Equally important, early intervention (such as the Head Start program) leads to improved outcomes in terms of increased earning potential, better health, and lower levels of delinquency. McCartney cited research from Nobel laureate economist James Heckman to support her view that early intervention addresses both social justice and cost-efficiency, leading to reductions in public outlays and a better economic future for more people.Audience members reacted to the talk with support and surprise. “I hadn’t fully realized the significance of intervention before kindergarten,” said Mike Harrison of Brighton. “It’s clearly much more effective and efficient than later interventions.” Robert Principe, a consultant, noted McCartney’s focus on life outcomes and economics: “If economists start to say more about how these improved life outcomes make a big difference in the financial bottom line, that could change the whole political conversation” about the “cost” of educating low-income students.Linda Greenhouse of Yale and The New York Times will talk about the Supreme Court in the next installment of the John Harvard Book Celebration, 5 p.m. on May 22 at the Honan-Allston Branch of the Boston Public Library.last_img read more

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Krzysztof Gajos named 2013 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow

first_img Read Full Story Krzystzof Gajos, assistant professor of computer science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), has been named a 2013 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow.He is among 126 fellows, including four others at Harvard, selected from the United States and Canada this year on the basis of their “independent research accomplishments, creativity, and potential to become leaders in the scientific community through their contributions to their field.”The $50,000 award will support Gajos’ research in the fields of human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, and applied machine learning.As director of the Intelligent Interactive Systems Group at SEAS, Gajos is conducting research on intelligent technology that improves the way humans interact with computational systems—for example, through personalized tools that adapt to a user’s accessibility needs or preferences. Other areas of interest include creativity support tools, interactive machine learning, methodologies for conducting large-scale experiments with online volunteers, and crowdsourcing.last_img read more

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