Ari Herstand To Host Online Workshop About Artist Management & The “New” Music Business

first_imgAuthor of best-selling book How To Make It in the New Music Business, Ari Herstand, is taking his expertise to the next level and hosting an online workshop series about artist management. In the first installment of Expert Conversations on the New Music Business, Ari will explore the topic What Does A Manager Do & How To Get One, while sitting down with six top-tier artist managers for 30 minutes each to dig on what they do, how they do it, what their days are like, and how to make things happen for their clients. He’ll also dive into how they look for potential clients and the right way to approach finding a manager. The session is designed for independent musicians or aspiring artists, and can be streamed online or attended in LA on Sunday, June 4.The experts will include Rob Abelow (Roll Call), Jonathan Azu (Red Light Management), Nick Bobetsky (Red Light Management), Michele Ceazan-Fleischli (Constant Artists), Anna Geyer-Savage (Roc Nation), and Justin Little (Constant Artists). Their client lists have ranged from Kanye West, Rihanna, Feist, Grizzly Bear, Band of Horses, Sonic Youth, Beck, Tenacious D, Ryan Adams, Rage Against the Machine, Odesza, CHRVCHES, and so many more.Expert Conversations on the New Music Business: What Does A Manager Do & How To Get One will provide a great overview to give independent musicians or aspiring artist managers the knowledge and insight when developing a successful career in the music industry. Attendees will also get a ton of additional resources at the completion of the webinar, including a sample management contract, sample pitch e-mail to potential managers, social-media calendar, and more. Read more about it here.Live For Live Music caught up with Ari Herstand to find out more about what to expect about next Sunday’s workshop.Live For Live Music: Ari, describe your professional career and how you got where you are today.Ari Herstand: I started my music career in Minneapolis around 2005. Specifically on the University of Minnesota campus. I started playing everywhere and anywhere around town. I got a little street team together to help promote my shows and my audiences grew from coffee shops to bars to venues to theaters. When I left Minneapolis in 2010 for LA, I was selling out the 800-cap Varsity Theater and was touring the country regularly.A few years back, I was getting so many questions from other musicians, first in just Minneapolis, but then all over the country, on how I was doing things for my career like booking tours, selling out clubs, opening for big artists, getting songs placed on TV, getting music online, etc etc. I had kind of become known as the musician who knew “the biz.” After awhile, I just didn’t have time to respond to everyone so I started a blog, Ari’s Take, and put up everything I had learned (and continued to learn) on there. Of course that brought in more questions so I kept it going. The reason I continue it is because so many musicians tell me how much it is helping them.Since quitting Starbucks in 2008, I’ve been making my living from my creative pursuits. For awhile it was 100% music 100% of the time. But because Ari’s Take grew so big, it opened up doors to other opportunities like writing for Digital Music News, speaking at conferences, consulting, and even a book deal. I just released my book, How To Make It in the New Music Business, this past December.L4LM: What makes you an “expert” source to host conversations on the new music business?AH: Ha. Great question. So, once I got the writing gig with Digital Music News in December 2013, it opened up my access to speak to virtually anyone in the music industry I wanted to – which was incredible for a DIY musician who couldn’t previously get most higher ups to respond to my emails. I had coffee with the #3 at Spotify, spoke on panels with the head of artist development at Pandora, and was interviewing multiple people in the industry a week from startup founders to label execs to managers, agents, publicists and honestly anyone who works in the music business.Then when I got the book deal to write this book, I interviewed a ton more people including DIY musicians making great livings doing it differently in the New Music Business. I have probably interviewed hundreds of people in the industry, most have been private Skype calls, and I have gathered a lot of knowledge and information on what is happening right now in music. In addition to, of course, learning from my own experiences as a working DIY musician.Also, music business schools worldwide are widely adopting my book to teach for their music business curriculum. And it’s a best seller on Amazon (!!!). So I guess people think I’m on the right track at seeing what’s going on in the music business today and how to navigate it.L4LM: What makes the music business “new”?AH: Well, the “old music business” is something we all understand: getting signed to a record deal, touring, getting on the radio. Success in the “old music business” was defined solely by selling a boat load of small priced items (records) to a boat load of people. That was it. Simple. The “new music business” is much more nuanced and complicated. And success in the “new music business” is about making a comfortable living doing doing what you love. Oftentimes, it’s about targeting a niche community and getting them to pay you a lot more money than simply $15 a year on a CD or $40 a year on a concert ticket. It’s now more about developing relationships with your fans and getting the super fans to support your entire career. It’s no longer about making the quick sale on a plastic disc.L4LM: What can we expect from this daylong conference?AH: This will be unlike any panel at any other conference in the sense that, well, it’s not a panel. I will be interviewing each manager, one-on-one asking them the questions DIY musicians (and aspiring managers) want to know. One of the biggest questions I had in my music career (for a few years) was actually how to get a manager. And no one could give me a clear answer on it. I honestly didn’t even really know what management was, but I figured it was the key to my success.I will dig in with each manager what they do on a daily basis, what management is, what they look for in potential clients, how musicians can get in touch with them (or any manager) if they feel they are ready for representation and, really, when musicians are ready for management and how they’ll know.Every attendee will walk away with tangible, concrete advice and plans of action to use for their music (or management) career right now.L4LM: Will it be worth it if we are watching from home?AH: Yup! We are working very hard to make sure it is just as valuable to live stream this from home as attending it in person in LA. We are even dedicating time for online networking amongst live stream attendees.L4LM: Story Time: Tell us the best thing you’ve ever experienced in the music industry. The worst?AH: Ok let’s start with the worst: I once got an opening gig for the Country star Phil Vassar at a college in Minnesota. I had a 6 piece band with me, but Phil’s stage setup took up 95% of the stage. The 6 of us basically had to setup in a straight line at the front of the stage in front of the curtain. 2,000 drunk college kids in cowboy hats, cowboy boots, and Tommy Hillfiger cologne piled into the Field House.We were told we were going to play a 45 minute set. 10 minutes before showtime the college kid in charge of the event, Sarah, told us that we they were going to push back the start time and cut our set by 15 minutes. As we stood in the wings waiting to go on, Sarah then asked us if we could cut our set even shorter – “like 20 minutes?”House lights went off. Crowd started cheering and chanting “Phil! Phil! Phil! Phil!”Sarah went out to the front of the stage: “Thank you all for coming to my event. I’m Sarah and the chair of the campus entertainment committee”“Phil! Phil! Phil!”“Oh yup Phil is coming”“Phil! Phil! Phil!”“But first I want you to welcome the guy who’s going to open the show…”“Phil! Phil! Phil!”“Please welcome Ari Herstand”“Phi…. BOOOOOOOOOO!”They legitimately were booing as the band and I walked on stage.It didn’t get much better from there.During my last song, I saw some drunk frat boys in the back joking around and whispering to each other. I knew something was up. There were 2,000 people between me and them so I wasn’t too worried. But just then, one of the dudes cocked his arm back and chucked something up over the 2,000 people and it hit me square in the chest. I debated bodysurfing back to the dudes, but decided to just finish the song, politely give a “fuck you very much” to the crowd, and get off stage. The ice cube didn’t hurt too much and luckily missed my guitar.When we got up to our green room, two-hour old, dried out burgers were waiting with a big sign that said: “Thanks Airie!”The best: Honestly, and it may sound cheesy, but it’s the fucking truth. Every time a musician comes up to me and tells me how much I have helped their music career. That’s it right there.Signup for the June 4th workshop here.last_img read more

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Gender-diverse companies thrive only in areas that embrace diversity

first_img Read Full Story Do gender-diverse companies make more money than businesses run primarily by men? If research says they perform better, that could bolster the argument that women should have more access to top positions in organizations. But previous studies have produced conflicting results. Why?We put this question to Harvard Business School Assistant Professor Letian Zhang, who studies organizational theory and strategy with a focus on social inequalities and status hierarchies. He explores the issue in a recent paper scheduled to be published in the journal Organization Science.Instead of following the usual methodology of studying organizations in a particular industry or geography, Zhang went wide and deep. He developed a longitudinal sample of 1,069 leading public firms in 35 countries and 24 industries. His chief finding: The social context around companies matters. That is, gender-diverse firms tend to thrive only in parts of the world that embrace gender diversity, like Europe.“For business leaders, this paper provides some preliminary evidence that diversity is positively correlated with productivity in contexts where gender diversity is valued,” Zhang said. “This is presumably because this kind of context creates a safe environment for women to contribute their ideas freely and therefore encourage the flow and exchange of ideas, increasing team performance.”last_img read more

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Judicial Council hosts election debate

first_imgThe candidates for student body president and vice president squared off in a debate Monday night ahead of Wednesday’s elections. The debate, which took place in the LaFortune Student Center basement, was organized by the Judicial Council’s Election Committee.After an opening statement, the three tickets — junior Olivia LaMagna and sophomore Rohan Andresen, freshmen George McCabe and Sean Campbell, and juniors Lauren Vidal and Matt Devine — each answered five questions from the Election Committee.Andresen, who currently serves as Siegfried Hall’s Senator, described several of his and LaMagna’s initiatives, including opening classes in certain departments to students who are not majors and instituting a student advocate during Student Activities Office planning.Devine, who served as director of the Gender Issues Department last year, described his and Vidal’s platform as “personalizing the Notre Dame experience,” using existing structures to institute new policies and to continue those that work.“Our platform stems from looking at what the individual student experience is, looking at the clubs and organizations and how student government can facilitate that and expanding it into the world too,” Devine said. Tori Roeck | The Observer Candidates for student body president and vice president debate Monday in anticipation of Wednesday’s elections.LaMagna, who is currently the junior class president, said she and Andresen would improve student government by working to be accessible and instituting some reforms, including changing the transition procedures for student government positions.“We want to make sure that kids are poised so that they can succeed from the second they get into office and finish out their term and be able to plan all the way through the semester,” LaMagna said.Vidal, who served as student union parliamentarian last year, said she and Devine would improve student government through “policy and programming,” including incorporating medical amnesty into Du Lac. Devine said he and Vidal also plan to increase transparency within student government.LaMagna said she and Andresen would improve student-community relations by increasing awareness of downtown events and businesses and working with other student organizations such as The Bridge Project.“There’s an extremely culturally rich community that’s so close to our campus, and by interacting with them in a more regular and normal way, I think that everybody can have a better Notre Dame experience,” LaMagna said.Devine said he and Vidal would increase interaction with the community by bringing farmer’s markets and other businesses to “quad markets” on campus. Vidal said they would also increase service opportunities, including creating a “29 for 29” program in which each dorm would “adopt” a local underprivileged family.“There are hundreds of families who are both in and out of the Center for the Homeless specifically who would really love help from students like us, as simple as getting a Christmas tree and decorating it, getting donations and presents and making them a meal,” Vidal said.LaMagna said she and Andresen would continue the current sexual assault prevention initiatives by focusing on prevention, including creating a mid-semester presentation for freshmen and naming male-female co-chairs on the Gender Issues Department.“Gender issues and sexual assault is not a one-way discussion,” LaMagna said. “Is shouldn’t be weighed by women who think that it’s their issue or men who think that it’s their thing to fight. We need to make sure the conversation is two-sided. We want to make sure that everybody feels like it is theie issue because it’s everyone’s issue.”Devine, citing his experience in the Gender Issues department and the Committee for Sexual Assault Prevention, said he and Vidal would continue the current administration’s programs, working with the University and students to raise awareness.“We really love the grassroots effort that [student body president] Alex [Coccia] has made with the prayer services, which is an initiative of the student government, but also the bystander training. We think that’s essential when talking about these things.”Also on the ballot were McCabe and Campbell, whose platform consisted of making class registration more complicated, creating a study abroad program in Zahm House for Saint. Mary’s students, asking Belmont Beverages to accept flex point, and making Wrangler Jeans the athletic apparel sponsor. Each of their initiatives was met with cheers from Zahm House residents.“Obviously we’re more concerned about our own needs than your needs, so let’s just get that out of the way,” McCabe, who wore an Easter Bunny costume to the debate, said.Kathryn Peruski, the Judicial Council’s Vice President of Elections, said she was pleased with the student turnout.“There were a lot of people there, which is always nice that people came out. … I was really impressed,” Peruski said. “The candidates obviously had great answers for what we were looking for, and I’m hoping that the students who came to listen got a lot of information from them. It was also publicity for the election, which is the ultimate goal, to get people to come vote.”Freshman Olivia Till said the debate showed her next year’s student government would be in good hands.“I thought that it was pretty obvious which candidates were here to be serious and which were here to be comic relief,” Till said. “I really appreciated the people that took a lot of time on their platform, and I think that we’re really lucky that we have student leaders that have such a clear vision for what they want to do on campus.”last_img read more

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Lecture explores environmental effects of WWI

first_imgDr. Tait Keller, assistant professor and director of environmental studies and sciences program at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee, presented a lecture at the Snite Museum of Art on Wednesday. Keller presented information on the wide-spread and long-lasting environmental effects caused by World War I as part of the Nanovic Institute’s Lecture Series on World War I.“Nature is both omnipresent and invisible,” Keller said, in regards to the mindset of those involved the War. “But I think that only by taking the environment into account can we really understand this war and how this conflict shaped the most basic levels of human existence.”Keller stated that although the integrity of the soil in the pastures along the western front suffered during its constant shelling, the soil recovered quickly. He also noted the obliterated deciduous trees in affected pine forests were replaced.During the war, European belligerents’ consumed much of the cattle in sub-Saharan Africa transformed grazing land into overgrown bush lands, which are hospitable environments for the tsetse fly, Keller said. The swelling tsetse fly population was a catalyst for “sleeping sickness” which killed droves of equatorial African natives.Keller also noted how European cattle seizures forced poor Africans to eat more simian meat. The increased contact between chimpanzee blood and humans could have been a component in the outbreak of an early strain of HIV.“The War had also increased blood transfusions, which together with aggressive vaccination campaigns in the colonies, mingles peoples’ blood and perhaps had accelerated the virus’ evolution,” Keller said.Food mobilization was also crucial to the European war efforts, according to Keller. Vigorous campaigns in the United States, such as artificially inflating the price of wheat, promoted crop production during the time period.“Optimistic farmers borrowed heavily, usually through second mortgages to expand cultivation on marginal lands,” he said. “Farmers also employed the one way disk, which could quickly break the soil and uproot weeds … but would leave a layer of loose sediment which years later would invite wind erosion.”Keller stated how the erosion of farmland soil, especially in the Great Plains region, likely precipitated the Dust Bowl. The Dust Bowl devastated farmers who were already economically unstable due to their investment in growing artificially priced crops during the War.Keller also pointed out how, during the War, American control of booming sugar farms in Cuba resulted in Cuban resentment of America, which would have serious historical implications.“[With an ecological perspective] on the War, we find that subjugated environments often meant marginalized people, alienated from their land,” Keller said. “Perhaps this is the Great War’s global legacy.”The Nanovic Institute’s lecture series will continue through December 12th, at the Snite Museum of Art. The series will be featuring lectures from professors from Notre Dame, University of Birmingham, the United Kingdom and Georgetown University.Tags: Dr. Tait Keller, environment, environmental effects of war, Nanovic Institute, Nanovic Institute for European Studies, nanovic lecture series, Rhodes College, Tait Keller, the Great War, world war I, WWI, WWI and the environmentlast_img read more

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Anything Hugh Jackman Can Lift, Ramin Karimloo Can Lift Better!

first_img Judging by what’s going on at Les Miz’s stage door every night, it’s Karimloo who’s now making others pass out for rather different reasons! We’re just dreaming a dream that he and 2014 Tony host Jackman will find a way to duet at this year’s ceremony on June 8! After seeing photos of Jackman dead-lifting 405 pounds, the New York Post reports that Karimloo increased his weights up to 415, saying, “Hugh inspired me to push on.” Karimloo’s wife, Mandy, a fitness teacher, helped him reach his goals. “After our first fit test, Ramin went white and passed out,” she said. “I had to carry him to the shower.” View Comments Ramin Karimloo Anything Hugh Jackman can do, Ramin Karimloo can do better! Well, perhaps when it comes to gym workouts that is. Karimloo has been stunning audiences as Jean Valjean in his Broadway debut in the new revival of Les Miz, not just because of his fabulous vocals, but also thanks to his physique. Karimloo recently revealed we have Jackman, who played the role in the 2012 movie, to thank for that. Star Files Related Shows Les Miserables Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 4, 2016last_img read more

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What are your options to recover your servers?

first_imgSo, you have a disaster. What are your credit union server recovery options?Take a deep breath. Sure, things aren’t going well right now. Maybe your SAN died. Maybe a server isn’t booting. Maybe you have malware. Whatever the reason, stress is high and everyone at your credit union is watching your every move.Of course, you have a business continuity or disaster recovery plan. But, what did it say again? What do you recover first? Well, this post won’t answer all of those questions, but it will help you understand the pros and cons of your recovery options. Read on to learn more. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Call in Congress for Family Court Reform

first_imgBy Joaquin Sapien, ProPublicaOn a Saturday evening in late March 2008, a 41-year-old Maryland man named Mark Castillo drowned his three children in the bathtub of a Baltimore hotel room.Castillo and his wife of 10 years, Amy, had been embroiled in a grueling custody dispute. Amy Castillo had repeatedly warned the courts that her mentally ill husband was unraveling, and had physically threatened her and their children. As a result, she tried to persuade the judge in the custody case to end Castillo’s unsupervised visits with the children.But the judge was not persuaded. He chose instead to rely on the testimony of a court-appointed psychologist, who said Castillo posed no risk to his family. Castillo’s visits with his children remained unchanged. Less than a year later, the children were dead. Castillo turned himself in hours after he killed them, having failed in his attempt to also kill himself. Castillo pleaded guilty in 2009 and is currently serving three life terms without the possibility of parole.Anti-domestic violence advocates plan to cite the Castillo case and others like it at a Congressional briefing in Washington on Tuesday in an attempt to gain support for family court reform. The advocates say that children are too often endangered by family courts and the supposed experts those courts rely on. Psychologists used by the courts to help make decisions “in the best interest” of children, the advocates argue, often lack expertise in child abuse and domestic violence.Rep. Ted Poe, R-Texas, has introduced a resolution that spells out what advocates call urgent and long overdue improvements to the way family courts handle allegations of abuse made during custody disputes. The resolution will require that any claims of abuse be thoroughly investigated by the courts before any custody proceeding even begins.“Protecting our children is one of the most important things we can do for society,” said Poe in a press statement announcing the measure. “Courts should resolve all claims of abuse independently before looking at any other factors in deciding custody or visitation. An independent and rigorous investigation into claims of abuse, coupled with heightened evidentiary standards, will help courts prevent the endangerment of any child.”The resolution does not carry the force of law, but rather expresses the sentiment of both houses of Congress. Still, a coalition of 18 anti-domestic violence and child advocacy groups say adopting the resolution would be a critical step forward. They circulated a letter to Congress last Friday, encouraging support for the resolution.“Too often, family courts sideline violence and abuse concerns in favor of unsound quasi-scientific psychological claims about the parents and children,” the letter said.Concerns about the role of psychologists in family courts — they are often known as “forensic evaluators” — have existed for years, mostly discussed in the closed circles of those who work in the often poorly financed and volatile world of child welfare, child support and juvenile crime. ProPublica has spent several months exploring the work of such evaluators in New York City Family Court, and will publish some of its findings in the coming weeks.The resolution to be proposed Tuesday would also call for new standards for the kind of scientific evidence and expert testimony allowed in custody disputes. For too long, advocates against domestic violence say, courts have relied on widely disparaged psychological theories to settle contentious custody disputes. Foremost among them is a diagnosis known as “parental alienation syndrome” — a highly controversial theory that, in its most extreme application, suggests parents, typically mothers, will concoct allegations of abuse during a custody dispute to heighten their chances of winning.In a package of briefing materials distributed along with the resolution, the advocates point to several studies showing how the theory had been dangerously applied, with family courts regularly awarding sole or shared custody to fathers with histories of violence.ProPublica contacted the National Board of Forensic Evaluators, a Florida-based organization that says it has certified dozens of people to evaluate children and families in custody disputes. The organization said it was reviewing the resolution and would issue a response. We will include it when we receive it.The resolution is based on a similar effort from 1990, in which Congress agreed that state courts should presume against a batterer in a custody decision. Afterward, 26 states passed laws to that effect.“It is my hope that this new resolution will provide similar encouragement,” Poe said in his statement.ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for their newsletter. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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Spain asks illegal migrants and jobless to pick fruit as coronavirus bites

first_imgAs one of the world’s worst-hit countries, Spain has declared a state of emergency and a strict lockdown until April 26, with only essential staff – which includes agricultural workers – free to travel to and from work.Spain’s agricultural ministry said the decree, which was issued on Tuesday, would remain in place for just under three months to guarantee food supplies and give an income to those “that need it the most”, with unemployment rising steeply.Afrucat, the Catalan association of fruit producers, warned last week that the agricultural sector in the wealthy northeastern province faced total collapse if 40,000 seasonal workers were not found urgently.Unemployed foreigners aged 18 to 21 will also be granted temporary work visas, the agriculture ministry said in its Tuesday statement.Salomo Torres, a spokesman for Unio de Pagesos, Catalonia’s largest farming union, said employing foreign workers – who are normally given accommodation – would be complicated due to social distancing rules.”With the state of alarm, lots of smallholding farmers could find laborers among their own family members, their neighbors or in their own town,” he said.”It’s not necessary to find a workforce from abroad.” Topics : Spain will temporarily allow thousands of illegal migrants to pick fruit to address labor shortages caused by the new coronavirus outbreak, in a move closely watched across Europe.The European Union’s biggest fruit and vegetable exporter will also allow unemployed Spaniards to continue to receive state benefits while working as fruit pickers in a bid to find 300,000 seasonal workers as it approaches the May harvest.”It’s an opportunity for lots of people, otherwise they’re just trapped at home,” Lorenzo Ramos, general secretary of the Union of Small Farmers, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.center_img “The countryside can be a refuge,” he said, adding that workers were needed from across Spain and abroad to harvest everything from strawberries, blueberries, oranges and grapes to prunes, tomatoes and courgettes.Spain is the first European country to make legal changes, but others are exploring solutions to agricultural labor shortages as travel restrictions imposed to combat the COVID-19 pandemic prevent cross-border workers travelling to their jobs.With the prospect of fruit rotting in the fields, France has called for a “shadow army” of laid off workers to step in, while Germany is flying in eastern European farm helpers to stave off poor harvests and higher food prices.The highly contagious COVID-19 respiratory illness could push 195 million people into unemployment globally, the International Labor Organization said on Tuesday.last_img read more

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You’ve got mail: ‘Abenomask’ distribution starts in Japan

first_imgThe cloth coverings have become widely referred to as “Abenomasks”, meaning “Abe’s masks” and a play on the prime minister’s much-touted “Abenomics” economic program.About 50 million households across the country will receive two masks each, delivered by Japan Post.At a post office distribution center in Tokyo on Friday, the first sets were going out for delivery to parts of the city with the highest number of virus cases.”We’ll be delivering the masks without any physical contact with the customer, just putting them in letter boxes,” said Japan Post official Hideo Aoyama.  Topics : Japan began distributing reusable cloth face masks on Friday dubbed “Abenomasks” after Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, whose decision to issue two per household has been met with mockery by some.Abe announced the measure on April 1 as part of a wider package of emergency policies to tackle the coronavirus pandemic, saying the delivery of cloth masks would help ease a nationwide shortage.But the decision attracted ridicule, particularly given the scanty size of the coverings. They sit over a much smaller portion of the face than disposable surgical masks that have become ubiquitous in Japan in recent months. “A lot of people are waiting for these masks, so I’ll be delivering them as quickly as possible,” added postman Taketo Nishiwaki.  Shortage The program is expected to cost 46.6 billion yen ($435 million), which some have criticized as a waste of taxpayer money, with commentators noting people can make masks at home.But others said the cloth coverings will be helpful given the ongoing shortages.”I guess it won’t hurt because you can wash them and reuse them and you can block your coughing and droplets by wearing them,” 26-year-old Yohei Ono told AFP.”But I have to say it’s very small as public support goes.”Online retail sites have moved quickly to ensure the cloth masks do not end up for resale on their platforms, with two popular forums Mercari and Yahoo Japan banning users from selling them.Face masks are not obligatory in Japan but were commonly worn during cold and hay fever seasons even before the coronavirus outbreak.Japan still has relatively few cases of the virus, with around 9,100 infections and 148 deaths recorded so far, but on Thursday Abe expanded a month-long state of emergency to cover the entire country.The measure had originally been put in place for seven regions with the highest number of infections. “It’s very late. The government should have issued the state of emergency nationwide when it declared it for the seven prefectures,” said Shoichi Inoue, 58, a warehouse worker.”The state of emergency may also be extended after May 6. That is worrying, too.”last_img read more

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You’ll be knocked over by the views from this former MMA fighter’s home

first_imgChris Haseman and the amazing view from hisAlbion home.THE man considered to be the pioneer of MMA fighting in Australia has listed his Albion property for sale.The converted warehouse, at 12 Moore St, Albion served as the base for both Chris Haseman’s family and business for almost a decade.Mr Haseman, who has retired from UFC, is also well known as a fitness trainer having worked with the Broncos, Reds and Wallabies. More from newsNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by Parks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus20 hours agoThe rooftop bar area at 12 Moore St, AlbionThe three-level home at 12 Moore St, Albion is almost camouflaged by neighbouring commercial buildings, but behind the front door is access to some of the most extraordinary city views.Mr Haseman ran his Fitness Industry Training business out of the lower level of the building, while the family lived on the middle level and had a rooftop bar on the top level. Family living on the middle level.The home is listed through Damon Warat of Ray White Ascot who will take it to auction on March 24. The offices on the ground level.“The offices can very easily be dismantled and turned back into a garage,’’ Mr Haseman said.“I’ve had the Reds and the Broncos downstairs in the gym. Dave Taylor agreed to his contract over the phone here, saying ‘yes’ to Souths on the driveway. There’s been some great things happen in this place over the years.”last_img read more

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